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The federal government's sentencing memorandum in the case of San Diegan Kyle "Dusty" Foggo, filed yesterday by the San Diego U.S. Attorney's office in court in Alexandria, Virginia, is full of details of his transgressions. Foggo has pleaded guilty to honest government wire fraud. He was the executive director of the C.I.A. from 2004 to 2006 -- one of the top positions at the agency. He steered contracts to his government contractor chum Brent Wilkes, with whom he had gone to high school (Hilltop), and college (SDSU). Wilkes treated Foggo to lavish meals and vacations. Foggo's favoritism cost the C.I.A. $2 million, according to the memorandum. Despite his fast rise at the agency, his supervisors considered him a "glad-hander" and a "con man," according to the memorandum. He met a woman overseas who would later become his mistress. He made sure the government kept his family overseas at government expense, while he wooed the lass. He got the C.I.A. to hire her, despite her lack of qualifications. The supervisor who pointed out these job inadequacies was fired. Foggo had relationships with multiple foreign women, says the sentencing memorandum.

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Comments

Don Bauder Feb. 24, 2009 @ 10:22 p.m.

NOTE: FOGGO HEARING FEB. 26. The above entry on Foggo had no date on the hearing -- a journalistic no-no. It happened because I could not find the date. Matt Potter was able to dig it out. The sentencing hearing is Feb. 26 at 10 a.m. in U.S. district court in Alexandria, Va. Best, Don Bauder

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SurfPuppy619 Feb. 25, 2009 @ 10:39 a.m.

Foggo is set for a nice long vacation.

Hopefully him and Wilkes can continue their life long friendship as be cellies.

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Don Bauder Feb. 25, 2009 @ 2:04 p.m.

Response to post #2: What could be more cozy? High school, college chums -- cellmates. Best, Don Bauder

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beachdogger Feb. 26, 2009 @ 6:34 a.m.

That fired supervisor should file a request with the court to have DVD's created filming him on vacations, restaurants, etc. and then to have those DVD's played, in stunning HD, as Mr. Foggo's only sole diversion during his incarceration.

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Don Bauder Feb. 26, 2009 @ 7:11 a.m.

Response to post #4: How about DVDs of his alleged romps with his mistress? Then he might enjoy his incarceration. Best, Don Bauder

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bartleby88 Feb. 26, 2009 @ 8:22 a.m.

Don, I like your journalism first of all. I would not expect any less of a University of Wisconsin man. My dad claims you were his classmate but then again my dad voted for Bush twice. Are we supposed to be suprised at the doings of the CIA and can we ever expect them to reform and obey the rule of law? I realize they are in a dangerous and difficult business but why do they seem to bring out the worst in some individuals that work there? Maybe we need some stories about the good things they do. I understand a journalist job is not to be a cheerleader but I think the American public needs some reassurance their government is not always corrupt.

Go Badgers!

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qqqqqjim Feb. 26, 2009 @ 1:48 p.m.

What doesn't come out in the press is why old Dusty had such a meteoric climb to number 3 man in the agency. It was pretty common knowledge around D.C. that as soon as former director Porter Goss got the job, Dusty was quickly promoted up through the ranks. You see, Porter and old Dusty were drinking buddies and fellow womanizers.

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Don Bauder Feb. 26, 2009 @ 1:56 p.m.

Response to post #6: Please send me an email at don.bauder@mac.com or call at 619-546-8529 and tell me your dad's name. We probably drank beer together at some point. I understand Bud Selig, commissioner of Major League Baseball, was at UW at the time (I don't remember knowing him) along with former Sen. Chuck Robb and several other notables. I will write something good about a government as soon as I find something. (Locally, I have written many favorable things about Donna Frye and Mike Aguirre.) Incidentally, did you get your Bartleby handle from Melville's character? Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Feb. 26, 2009 @ 9:18 p.m.

Response to post #7: Why did Dusty make it to number 3 in the CIA? Who says talent and integrity pay off in government -- or industry, for that matter? Dusty's superiors described him as a con man. That's why he got where he did. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder March 2, 2009 @ 11:28 a.m.

Response to post #10: Foggo wanted to retire from the CIA and run for Congress from San Diego. He would have followed in the footsteps of Duke Cunningham. Unlike Cunningham, Foggo got caught BEFORE he went to Congress. Best, Don Bauder

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Burwell March 2, 2009 @ 11:05 p.m.

They probably had to go pretty light on Foggo. He could do some serious damage to the country if he starts spilling secrets. He will probably get a private room in prison with satellite TV and all the amenities. He will likely be protected by bodyguards 24 hours a day, and will not be allowed to talk to other prisoners due to national security concerns. The agency will probably make sure he sleeps in a soundproof room otherwise he might damage national security by talking in his sleep. The CIA will likely provide him with a pension for life even though he was convicted of a crime, just to insure he doesn't start blabbing.

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Don Bauder March 3, 2009 @ 6:25 a.m.

Response to post #12: I don't know where Foggo will be sent -- to one of those country club prisons where white collar thieves go or, as you suggest, to a normal prison in which he is closely guarded. Best, Don Bauder

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SurfPuppy619 March 3, 2009 @ 11:35 a.m.

They probably had to go pretty light on Foggo. He could do some serious damage to the country if he starts spilling secrets. He will probably get a private room in prison with satellite TV and all the amenities. He will likely be protected by bodyguards 24 hours a day, and will not be allowed to talk to other prisoners due to national security concerns. The agency will probably make sure he sleeps in a soundproof room otherwise he might damage national security by talking in his sleep. The CIA will likely provide him with a pension for life even though he was convicted of a crime, just to insure he doesn't start blabbing.

By Burwell

Yes, the article had stated that Foggo and his lawyers said they were going to "out" CIA policy and procedure-and I can guarantee you that no federal judge in America would allow that type of nonesense or blackmail to go on at trial.

I do think Foggo will be isolated, and what that means is not that he will get 24 hour protection or supervision, it means he will be in "administrative segregation"-or isolation-typically spending 23 hours per day in his cell. Anyone that gets stuck in that hell hole will hate it after the first day. It causes the mind to break down and mental illness sets it.

I am sure Foggo has qualified for a gov. pension, as Duke Cunningham did, and he will collect just it- as Duke is currently.

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Don Bauder March 3, 2009 @ 5:24 p.m.

Response to post #14: Oh, I am sure he will get a fat pension. I don't believe even a felony can deprive him of that. So I think he will be OK -- financially, anyway -- after emerging. And people will forget his crimes, particularly with so many other crimes being committed these days. He might get a job as a lobbyist. Best, Don Bauder

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