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How do you personally benefit through taxes?

Asked by Jane Belanger

September 1, 2010

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Adam Greene

From Gainsville, Florida (English Teacher)

Schools and libraries. I went to college for free the first two years through the government and public school growing up. Tennessee has scholarships for certain groups and stuff like that, and I fell into one of those groups. I got government grants, so I’m a pretty big fan of that. And then public schools, I like those. Roads, firemen, police…I’m a fan of all of that.

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Max Alfaro

From Solana Beach (Student)

Well, the streets are clean and everything. I came from Mexico, so compared to there it’s, like, way cleaner and everything. In Mexico it’s way different. I can definitely see what the money goes to here.

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Eva Kvaas

From La Mesa (Drama Teacher)

I think parks are nice. It’s nice to have public parks. I go to Balboa Park a lot. I think the park is supported by taxes, isn’t it? I like to walk around, people watch, look in the museums, see some of the performances there.

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Karen Neumann

From San Carlos (Accounting Work)

I actually don’t think I receive any benefits! I actually think I lose a lot. I’m not poor enough to be considered poor, and I feel like I pay way too much in taxes and I don’t benefit from it at all. I feel like I don’t get anything. I’m pretty much stuck in the middle. I feel like I pay a lot and I don’t get anything back for it.

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Eric Flink

From North Park (Suit Salesman)

I just moved here, so I’m just exploring what benefits I’ll get in California. I’m seeing that California has more restrictions than Massachusetts on the workforce. I think there’s been more lawsuits here. Like this rule where you have to go on a lunch break after five hours, and these funny little things they don’t have in Massachusetts...yet. I think there the tax rate is close to the sixes, whereas here it’s 8.25 or something. We’re getting up there. It’s called Taxachusetts for a reason.

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John Ion

From La Jolla (Nightclub Promoter)

Education. I go to a junior college, so it helps a lot. I know the classes would be really expensive if we didn’t have tax dollars going toward it. I think you save, like, $5000 or something because of tax money. It helps a lot.

Comments

Evelyn Sept. 1, 2010 @ 4:02 p.m.

Everyone benefits from taxes. Roads, schools, parks, etc. Just about everything, if not everything, the government does or provides is paid for by taxes.

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SurfPuppy619 Sept. 3, 2010 @ 2:43 p.m.

I think gov employees benefit the MOST through taxes.

Although the things listed are paid for by taxes, they account for less than 20% of tax expenditures, 80% of ALL taxes (and this is true for both state and muni) goes to gov employee pay and benefits, aka compensation.

Can you imagines if the average private business spent 80% of their revenue on compensation!!!!!!

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David Dodd Sept. 2, 2010 @ 2:53 a.m.

Here you go, bartender:

http://www.irs.gov/taxpros/article/0,,id=98137,00.html

I'll take that hundred grand in a non-greedy way. Ten-grand per month, if you please. Actually, you can short-change me a penny per payment as I'm only allowed to bring $9,999.99 over the border at any given time. Thanks in advance.

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SurfPuppy619 Sept. 3, 2010 @ 2:39 p.m.

I'm only allowed to bring $9,999.99 over the border at any given time. Thanks in advance.

I actually this may be a crime to do, at least if you do it mutliple times to get arond a financial reporting statute.

I know it is with banks.

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Joe Poutous Sept. 2, 2010 @ 11 a.m.

If I had all that extra money, I'd probably just waste it.

  • Joe
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David Dodd Sept. 3, 2010 @ 1 p.m.

Na. Internet offers rarely pan out ;)

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David Dodd Sept. 3, 2010 @ 3:15 p.m.

"I actually this may be a crime to do, at least if you do it mutliple times to get arond a financial reporting statute."

Sounds Yoda-esque, there, SP.

But if I understand you correctly, you're sort of comparing it to getting around the bank transaction laws designed to curb money laundering.

To my knowledge, there is nothing preventing anyone from legally bringing over $9,999.99 as often as they wish. At least, there is no law preventing them from doing so. However, that could change - at least, there will be a lot more people attempting to do just that in the near future.


That's a stringer story filed by my buddy T.B., and what it's going to do is to force legitimate Mexican business owners to bank in the U.S. The dollar is at least as much of a standard (if not more at times) than is the Peso here in Tijuana and in other border cities. Much of residential and business rent is collected by landlords in U.S. dollars, it is historically more stable than pesos.

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SurfPuppy619 Sept. 4, 2010 @ 4:12 p.m.

But if I understand you correctly, you're sort of comparing it to getting around the bank transaction laws designed to curb money laundering.

To my knowledge, there is nothing preventing anyone from legally bringing over $9,999.99 as often as they wish.

Yes, it is true of banking transactions, but I thought it was also true of border crossings, but was not positive.

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David Dodd Sept. 4, 2010 @ 4:30 p.m.

"..I thought it was also true of border crossings..."

I've done a light search on the subject and have come up with mothing that prevents it. I have been asked many times - both leaving Mexico and entering it - by Homeland Security if I am carrying $10,000.00 or more. You probably heard me laughing from where you're at.

"Look at me," I told them. "Do I look like I'm carrying that kind of cash?!"

Once, before entering Mexico, one officer in the U.S. asked me the question and I sarcastically asked to borrow a penny so I'd hit the magic mark. He laughed.

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SurfPuppy619 Sept. 4, 2010 @ 5:17 p.m.

I have been asked many times - both leaving Mexico and entering it - by Homeland Security

Question-is this when you enter Mexico by CAR???

I never drive in, when I used to go I would always park and walk in, and there was never anyone at the entrance turnstyles 90% of the time, every now and then there would be a couple of SDPD cops, but they never asked me any questions.

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David Dodd Sept. 4, 2010 @ 5:54 p.m.

By foot. I don't drive, haven't for a decade. I go green before it was chic to go green!

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SurfPuppy619 Sept. 4, 2010 @ 8:37 p.m.

I have not been to Mexico in a number of years-it appears they have changed things, even when you walk in.

Refried- if I walked into TJ today, do they require a passport to gain re entry back into the USA???? Or will a CDL be suffecient??

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David Dodd Sept. 4, 2010 @ 9:46 p.m.

They require a passport. BUT they cannot deny you entry into the U.S. without one, they can simply detain you for a few hours.

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SurfPuppy619 Sept. 5, 2010 @ 7:56 a.m.

Got it-thanks.

I do not have a passport. I do find it a bit over the top to require one coming back from Mexico-TJ especially-but those are the rules in post 911.

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Founder Sept. 5, 2010 @ 10:24 a.m.

I suggest that you get a passport ASAP, then we can meet up with RFG for lunch and figure out how to save the Planet!

unless

RFG wants to cross into SD, then we could all get together sooner!

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Evelyn Sept. 7, 2010 @ 9:58 a.m.

A driver's license with original birth certificate works too, if one doesn't have a passport.

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