• Story alerts
  • Letter to Editor
  • Pin it

Qualcomm's Paul Jacobs raked in $20.7 million in total compensation last year — 62nd among 200 chief executives of companies with capitalization of at least $1 billion filing proxies last year by May 30. The data, compiled by Equilar, were printed yesterday (June 8) in the New York Times.

Paul Jacobs's 2013 pay was about in line with the average of the 200 chief executives; that average was up a whopping 32 percent from the previous year.

On March 4 of this year, Steve Mollenkopf replaced Jacobs as chief executive of Qualcomm. Jacobs became executive chairman.

  • Story alerts
  • Letter to Editor
  • Pin it

Comments

Visduh June 9, 2014 @ 7:58 p.m.

Now that he has been replaced as CEO, might we expect Paul's salary to drop or vanish? Or is is far more likely that he will continue to draw an ever-growing salary as the son of the founder, regardless of his role then, now, or in the future?

0

Don Bauder June 9, 2014 @ 9:28 p.m.

Visduh: My guess is that next year, we might see two Qualomm executives -- one of them Paul Jacobs -- in the top 200 CEO salaries. That's just a guess. Best, Don Bauder

0

Visduh June 10, 2014 @ 8:33 p.m.

I fear you are right. And if so, it means that the corporation will be paying two super-fat salaries to get one capable executive. Mollenkopf holds the future of that corporation in his hands. Son Paul is just along for the ride, but how well it pays to ride!

0

Don Bauder June 10, 2014 @ 8:58 p.m.

Visduh: As chairman, Paul Jacobs will be doing long-term strategizing, supposedly. Mollenkopf is said to be an excellent executive. Best, Don Bauder

0

ImJustABill June 12, 2014 @ 6:43 a.m.

Do you guys think the "say-on-pay" provisions in Dodd-Frank (allowing shareholders non-binding votes on CEO pay) have made much difference in CEO pay?

0

Don Bauder June 12, 2014 @ 2:01 p.m.

ImJustABill: I don't know about shareholder votes on CEO pay. Trouble is, so much stock is held by Wall Street institutions, which almost always vote with management. (And the Wall Streeters have even more obscene compensation than the CEOs.)

Recently, shareholders of high-flying Chipotle Mexican Grill complained that each of the co-chief executives brought in about $25 million last year. Only 23% of shareholders voted for this compensation. But the matter isn't settled. Best, Don Bauder

0

Sign in to comment

Join our
newsletter list

Enter to win $25 at Broken Yolk Cafe

Each newsletter subscription
means another chance to win!

Close