Jason Koons glassed a surfboard without a respirator
  • Jason Koons glassed a surfboard without a respirator
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At Scripps Institute of Oceanography last weekend, February 15, more than 70 people gathered to learn why “The Future of Surfing Is Not Disposable” — this was among the topics at the Groundswell Society’s 12th annual Surfing Arts, Science and Issues conference.

Almost 20 speakers came together to discuss the fate of coral reefs in a high carbon dioxide future, the life cycle of a sustainable surfboard, emerging technologies, and putting sustainability into action.

Usually, toxic resins are used in the fabrication of surfboards and skis, but that’s changing. Entropy Resins has developed an earth-friendly formula that isn’t yellow. Co-founder Rey Banatao said life-cycle analysis of the new white resin shows a 50 percent reduction in CO2 production.

SUPERbrand’s Jason Koons said Entropy’s Super Sap epoxy bioresin is now as good as any resin on the market, and he used it to glass a surfboard at the front of the auditorium.

Sustainable Surf cofounder Kevin Whilden pointed out that “we did not issue gas masks to everyone in this room because they’re not needed.” From the front row, I detected only a slight odor. “Kind of smells like Thai food,” Koons quipped.

Entropy cofounder Rey Banatao played a video that showcased one of his company’s latest projects: recyclable composites. Immersed in non-toxic hot vinegar, hardened resin dissolved from carbon-fiber cloth, allowing both to be reclaimed. Imagine a ski that could be separated into its constituent parts for reuse. Plastics had to be redesigned to allow them to be recycled, Banatao explained.

Resins aren’t the only surfboard component going greener; their cores are, too. Rob Falken of Tecniq showed off one of his pale green BIÓM surfboard blanks made from 99 percent polymerized sugarcane biomass and expanded with CO2 “borrowed” from the air. It’s lightweight, waterproof, durable, industrially compostable, and launching in a few months.

Enjoy Handplanes’ Ed Lewis has gone beyond shaping hand-planes from broken surfboards and created one of compressed hay, but he dreams of using mushroom-based foam. Although it isn’t ready for use in blanks yet, mushroom foam has been shaped into surfboard fins and used to protect NOAA buoys.

(adapted from an article first posted on The Inertia)

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leetowan Feb. 26, 2014 @ 9:50 p.m.

Thank you for sharing this! I love the Super Sap concept idea for glassing on surfboards. I'm in for it, all the way! My boyfriend is a glasser and a shaper till now for 23 years. As a partner who supports his passion. I rather have my babe using super sap to glass surfboards not only for eco friendly environment, but for his health while working on something he is very passion about. Last year he worked an environment warehouse without any ventilation for his glassing area at all. Of course the result was bad. But the guys who owned the warehouse did their very best to accommodate everything for my boyfriend for his glassing area. It's not their fault. It is something for me and my BF could afford. He improvised every we could to keep our passion. He'd made few surfboards with super sap recommended by custom shape buyers, and the results; tons and tons of satisfactions! Not only he shaped and glassed them super sweet and fast. But made the boards super strong and eco friendly. The greenish color from the super sap? It reminds me the kelp beds up north from home during my abalone dive for food. My BF would rather use super sap for the same reason. Unfortunately, the price to buy something healthy cost an arm and a leg. Like the usual stuff everywhere, spend very very expensive just to stay healthy. When your budget is suffering and shaping/glassing boards is the only income for food and shelter you have. It's tough. You had no idea. And yeah there are other ways. But working for something you are very passion about is of course... priceless. The bright side of this? We love working on surfboards. We love surfing, we love meeting new faces and we love to make things right. Even tho, how hard and difficult it is and of course pricely. So for me typing this extreme comment about super sap without my BF permission??? Is suicide. :) Wish me luck and I hope i get to graduate from sanding surfboards. OXOXO MAHALO -Bernie

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