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After it’s completed, the dam at San Vicente Reservoir, near Lakeside, will be the largest roller-compacted concrete dam-raise in the world. From the deep rock basin to the top of the dam, it will stand 337 feet tall.

The dam is being raised 117 feet above the existing 220-foot-tall structure, which was completed in 1943 to supply San Diego County. The additional height will reportedly double the capacity, creating storage for an additional 152,000 acre feet of water — “enough water to sustain 300,000 households in our region for about a year,” according to an informational video produced by the San Diego County Water Authority.

The project is close to reaching its final stages as far as the concrete is concerned. Concrete has been produced onsite, deposited, and then compacted in one-foot increments by rollers. There is still much detail work to be done prior to the estimated opening date in late 2017. The San Diego County Water Authority will be depending on Mother Nature to do its part in filling the reservoir.

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Comments

GrokSurf Sept. 18, 2012 @ 9:57 a.m.

There's one word missing in the above phrase "storage for an additional 152,000 acre feet of water" -- and that is "emergency." The additional storage is intended to expand the county's emergency storage capacity in case of a disaster that cuts San Diego from imported supplies. It's not intended as an ongoing supply for those 300,000 homes.

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Twister Sept. 18, 2012 @ 10:04 p.m.

"Emergency" is spin-speak for more development. Don't forget, "Nine-tenths of the hell being raised in the world is well-intentioned." --Anon. Well intentioned, my a$$! It's just a plain old lie.

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Twister Sept. 18, 2012 @ 10:09 p.m.

And, I hope nobody dies when the shopping centers in the San Diego River bed (euphemistically referred to as Mission "Valley") are tsunami-ed out to sea when the dam bursts or is busted by terrorists.

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lakesidejeep Sept. 21, 2012 @ 10:18 p.m.

What they fail to tell you is that they (County Water Authority) offered a mediocre price for the private property in the valley with the price of what was paid 35 years ago and when we didn't wish to sell, they claimed imminent domain and took it. Neighbors are going to loose their properties also since the county won't let people live right on the water even thought it's still private property

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