• Story alerts
  • Letter to Editor
  • Pin it

St. Agnes Catholic Church became a parish when Father Manuel Rose arrived in 1933. Lately, several congregants have been discussing among themselves the possibility that the beloved Portuguese mainstay in Point Loma may be closing.

A longtime parishioner mentioned declining attendance. The majority of weekly worshipers are elderly Portuguese and Point Loma families with kids. An usher told me that St. Agnes usually draws 700 people every weekend for all their services combined and hauls in about $20,000 in tithes per month.

All around the church, expensive condos are springing up, and the land St. Agnes sits on (at the corner of Evergreen and Cañon streets) is valuable. In fact, many nearby single-family homes have been torn down by developers who put up multifamily housing on the smallish lots.

  • Story alerts
  • Letter to Editor
  • Pin it

More from SDReader

More from the web

Comments

Ken Harrison June 1, 2011 @ 10:53 a.m.

Neighborhood churches like this one should never "parish." Although I've never attended, I've driven by so many times. Its a beautiful, white, crisp and clean place of worship. Hopefully will always be a church of some denomination.

0

Joaquin_de_la_Mesa June 1, 2011 @ 11:53 a.m.

This is a problem with churches tied to a single ethnicity. After a couple of generations, we're all just Americans. But the ethnic label sticks, in this case, Portuguese, so non-Portuguese stay away.

All over the East and the Midwest, ethnic parishes have closed. In some cases, there was a Polish church on one corner, and an Irish church across the street. They couldn't both stay open.

0

kearnykomet71 June 2, 2011 @ 5:47 a.m.

I wonder why "parish" is both a church and a county in Louisiana.

0

phredup Nov. 22, 2011 @ 11:54 a.m.

I don't know who Gail Powell is but this is the most obnoxious example of poor reporting/news gathering I have seen in a long time. It is all heresay with no actual facts (or truth). St. Agnes is thriving. Many young families,different cultures, and generations. How does The Reader let this garbage be published? I guess you can just make up stories and submit them as fact.

0

mandolinist4u Jan. 25, 2012 @ 10:22 a.m.

My parents were married at Saint Agnes. I attended K-grade 8 at Saint Agnes School and was one of very few who was not Portuguese. Although I am usually absent from mass, Saint Agnes Church enjoys many strong catholic regular parishioners including my parents. One thing I learned about the Portuguese is that you don't mess with their church. If you doubt me, then just attend the annual Fieshta and Penticost Parade.

0

Sign in to comment