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On the Lord’s own day, assemble in common to break bread and offer thanks; but first confess your sins, so that your sacrifice may be pure. However, no one quarreling with his brother may join your meeting until they are reconciled; your sacrifice must not be defiled. For here we have the saying of the Lord: “In every place and time offer me a pure sacrifice; for I am a mighty King,” says the Lord; “and my name spreads terror among the nations.” Accordingly, elect for yourselves bishops and deacons, men who are an honor to the Lord, of gentle disposition, not attached to money, honest, and well-tried; for they, too, render you the sacred service of the prophets and teachers. Do not, then, despise them; after all, they are your dignitaries, together with the prophets and teachers.


The Didache (1st–2nd Century A.D.) was an early anonymous Christian treatise that nonetheless is ascribed to the “Twelve Apostles” because of its early adherence to the teachings of the Apostles on three focal Church teachings — baptism, the Eucharist, and church governance. So important was the work that some early Church fathers considered it a part of the New Testament; today it is still considered part of the canon of works by the Apostolic Fathers.

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