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Murtaza Baxamusa of the Center on Policy Initiatives says that San Diego’s shortage of middle-class jobs “is a very pertinent problem.” He feels that unemployment in San Diego “will hover around 10 percent for a while.” But he doesn’t think high unemployment will become the new reality: “There is more awareness of the macroeconomic impact [of high unemployment] on Main Street. This will not be accepted for too long.”

Nationally, “Unemployment will be above 8 percent for several years,” says economist James Hamilton of the University of California San Diego. Like Baxamusa, he believes a weaker dollar could help employment. On August 6, the U.S. Labor Department revealed that July job numbers were weak, and the unemployment rate remained at 9.5 percent. Some economists think the Federal Reserve will try to push long-term interest rates even lower, and the government might try even more fiscal stimulus. Hamilton, however, doesn’t think that such initiatives will dramatically improve the job picture. And they will worsen the nation’s financial stability: “We don’t have unlimited ability to borrow,” he warns.

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a2zresource Aug. 18, 2010 @ 3:31 p.m.

I am hoping that among the unemployed and under-employed, there are those who can use the circumstances of their own situation to start their own small businesses in their own communities. People will have to pull themselves up from their own bootstraps rather than depend on the government or charity.

I would not be surprised to see an increasing incidence of upper-class families taking on casual workers for room and board from among those who have no jobs or homes to speak of. It's not like we haven't seen indentured servitude before in America...

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Woodchuck Aug. 18, 2010 @ 3:56 p.m.

Don't worry folks, redevelopment in downtown San Diego and elsewhere will create hundreds of thousands of hospitality industry type jobs. All you need to do is stack up families 4 to a household, pay increasing taxes to fund services and not pay too much attention to the transfer of wealth upward!

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Don Bauder Aug. 18, 2010 @ 5 p.m.

Response to post #1: Good thought, but business startups need capital. And banks aren't doing much lending. One reason is that regulators are instituting very tight restrictions on lending. Why? A major reason is that if the banks really started to loan money, and the economy started to pick up sharply, severe inflation would erupt. The Federal Reserve has created an historic amount of money. It won't cause inflation unless lending picks up. I do not believe the Fed really wants much lending -- meaning it doesn't want much economic growth at this time. That's why I believe high unemployment has become the new reality. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 18, 2010 @ 5:04 p.m.

Response to post #2: Those hospitality jobs are low-paying. But so much corporate welfare downtown is aimed at jacking up this low-paying industry. The establishment doesn't care about these low-wage jobs, as long as its nabobs get richer from the welfare. Best, Don Bauder

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rebroker Aug. 18, 2010 @ 5:50 p.m.

This comment was removed by the site staff for violation of the usage agreement.

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Don Bauder Aug. 18, 2010 @ 10:05 p.m.

Response to post #5: Sales are dropping, prices seem to be holding fairly well -- now. The government is cooking up new programs. Mortgage rates are at lows not seen for half a century or more. I think it's too early to call a double-dip, but you are no doubt closer to the market than I am. Best, Don Bauder

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Twister Aug. 18, 2010 @ 10:48 p.m.

Based on square-foot prices, listings are about the same or more than they were in 2005, around four or five hundred, at least in my neighborhood, which is lower-middle-class. Why is this, if housing prices are supposed to be down?

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thestoryteller Aug. 19, 2010 @ 12:15 a.m.

I think one problem is going to be that employment will be a buyer's market, and that competition will be fierce. My daughter got a student loan for phlebotomy school, got her license, then couldn't pay back the loan because there were no entry-level jobs. Now that so many people are competing for jobs, labs are requiring a minimum of two years' experience. She couldn't even volunteer to get experience. The only hospital that would take her on was out at Camp Pendleton, and she didn't have a car to get there.

I paid for a chunk of the loan from money I won in the neighborhood story contest, and my dad went ahead and paid it off. He lets her pay it back $30 at a time.

I was in probation which is county, and the entire department was practically wiped out. Now probationers fill out a form and send it in. I'd like to know what types of government jobs will be available. I'll bet they will require a level of experience and education that a lot of people won't have.

My husband was laid off in 2008. He's just holding his breath until he can take early retirement in two years. But a recent article in NCT said social security will be broke in a few years. I also read that many people are doing the same thing. Social Security may go broke earlier than expected.

I had planned to go back to get a master's degree once my kids left home. But I'm afraid I'll get the loan and won't be able to subsequently get a job to pay it back. My age will be a detriment, as well as the economy. It seems hopeless.

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Don Bauder Aug. 19, 2010 @ 6:58 a.m.

Response to post #7: This is an enigma. Countywide, prices peaked in late 2005 or early 2006 (depending what numbers you are looking at), and plunged 35%. A neighborhood still riding at 2005 values would be fighting the trend. I really don't have a reason. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 19, 2010 @ 7:05 a.m.

Response to post #8: What I dislike is that the Federal Reserve says it will keep giving the big banks money at 0% as long as unemployment stays high. The trading desks at these banks are grinning ear to ear, having a ball getting money for effectively nothing and gambling with it any way they want. Do they want unemployment to come down? Of course not. They can make their money on the upper crust -- the plutonony that I talked about in an earlier column. And as I have mentioned before, if the banks start lending, and the economy recovers briskly, inflation will zoom. So everyone hopes for a very, very moderate recovery. That's not too hopeful for the job seeker. Best, Don Bauder

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Founder Aug. 19, 2010 @ 7:59 a.m.

This article make good sense of what is really happening in San Diego!

While things stay the same or get a bit worse, many at the City and County proudly march on toward 2050 chanting their same mantra, "We have to plan NOW for 2050, because by then the population will have grown by 20%".

Our County and City Planners who are both very highly paid and really happy that they can surf this financial downturn by getting paid to attend all these planning meeting to support changes that benefit "growth" and indirectly themselves... If lots of folks sell and move away, the City and County "win" because the new Owners will pay much higher property taxes than you do; that is in my opinion what is driving the major push for increasing Density and Redevelopment in San Diego.

I believe that San Diego future will be, not unlike one of the Hawaiian Islands; a great place to visit and an even better place to live, if you are Wealthy. If you are young, looking for work or on a fixed income, then life here will be fiscally challenging and many who consider themselves "locals" will be forced to relocate elsewhere, to escape the high cost of living, Utility Increases and tax increases that will be "sold" to the Public by those that will profit by them...

Now is the time for everyone in San Diego that is already feeling the financial "Pinch" to get involved in what is going on in your neighborhood, your City and your County!

Now, before the next election and promote for what is best for you and folks like you or we all will just get more of the same Leadership that has gotten US where we are now, concerned if we, in the future, will even be living in San Diego!

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SurfPuppy619 Aug. 19, 2010 @ 8:02 a.m.

I believe that San Diego future will be, not unlike one of the Hawaiian Islands; a great place to visit and an even better place to live, if you are Wealthy. If you are young, looking for work or on a fixed income, then life here will be fiscally challenging and many who consider themselves "locals" will be forced to relocate elsewhere, to escape the high cost of living, Utility Increases and tax increases that will be "sold" to the Public by those that will profit by them...

Agree 100%.

Two Americas today.

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Founder Aug. 19, 2010 @ 8:19 a.m.

Reply to #10

I agree with your thinking about the Big Banks and also feel that "they" will prevent a double dip because then that will show that they are not at least keeping things where they are now... Many Leaders in Government are OK will keeping things stable where they are now, which is really good for their large supporters (and themselves) "the plutonony" (great word!) who are all happily shopping in "Walmart USA" where everything is on sale at once in a lifetime prices with almost free financing, if you "know someone" and they do!

The danger with continuing this destruction of the Middle Class is that, as we have a greater divide between the Rich and the Poor, "Personal Crime" will increase (look at Mexico for a glimpse of a very possible future) and all those we owe money to (like China) will also begin to take actual possession of real estate property and key businesses's (Energy Generation, Utilities, Food Production, etc.) as they reduce their paper money holdings for something much more tangible.

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Founder Aug. 19, 2010 @ 8:33 a.m.

The one thing that is now keeping most the sinking middle class afloat is Social Security or the expectation of receiving Social Security benefits soon...

If all those savings were allowed to have been self managed five years ago (which many pushed very hard for) then that money would have also been swallowed up by all the stock market/Bank loses and now another 20% of our population, if not much more, would be on the "Dole"...

Social Security is the next "Golden Ring" coming around and if you are into money that is your next target; I'm expecting to see much Congressional talk about "helping Social Security out", but most of it, will be by folks that only want to "help themselves and their supporters out", of all that money!

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David Dodd Aug. 19, 2010 @ 8:34 a.m.

Jobless claims report from this morning (8/19):

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/us_economy

Stock market reacts negatively in spite of small rise in leading economic indicators.

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SurfPuppy619 Aug. 19, 2010 @ 8:38 a.m.

My daughter got a student loan for phlebotomy school, got her license, then couldn't pay back the loan because there were no entry-level jobs.

I had planned to go back to get a master's degree once my kids left home. But I'm afraid I'll get the loan and won't be able to subsequently get a job to pay it back.

Student Loans are a MAJOR problem. I currently have the the biggest case involving SL's in the country pending at the 9th Circuit (on rehearing, then off to the SCOTUS). There is MAJOR fraud in the program, and the lack of ANY legal or consumer protections is the biggest reason they have so much fraud. The failure of the federal courts to remedy these problems is an even BIGGER problem (there are major Constitutional violations in many of the laws that support student loans);

http://atlantapost.com/2010/08/17/will-student-loan-debt-be-the-next-bubble-to-burst/

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SurfPuppy619 Aug. 19, 2010 @ 8:40 a.m.

Based on square-foot prices, listings are about the same or more than they were in 2005, around four or five hundred, at least in my neighborhood, which is lower-middle-class.

Believe it or not, during the last downturn, I bought a 1 bedroom condo in City Heights (not the best area of town) for $17 a sq ft!

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Founder Aug. 19, 2010 @ 9:21 a.m.

Reply #16 & #17

Your families "case" is not unusual; the youth of today (even in San Diego) are hitchhiking on their Parents wealth in order to "make it", bridging the unemployment gap toward economic freedom in the form of a job (any job) that has a possible future. Like the old saying, "Family comes first" and for good reason, who better to support, than those in your own family, in the hopes that will will do the same for you, should you later, be the one in need!

With so many folks looking for jobs, it is no wonder that many are being ripped off by "schools" and "Colleges" that sell their "dream" opportunity, as the BEST path toward employment and a better life. Those that prey upon the dreams of others are among the Greediest of all and should be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law so that they don't just change their Company and or their own name and set up shop again, in another location! Good luck in your case...

BTW: I seriously suggest that your daughter consider Military Service, as it now seems that those with Military training and service will get first priority in the future tight job market. The Military has a great Nursing Program, plus by the time she gets out, economic times may be better than they are now, and she'll also know better how to take care of herself and her loved ones in our Nations new reality of a two tiered economic system!

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Don Bauder Aug. 19, 2010 @ 9:29 a.m.

Response to post #11: Good points, but I believe that what is pushing density and more development is the fact that greedy real estate developers control the politicians. Many if not most of the pols' decisions are in land use; they pretend they are thinking about future tax revenue when they grant another development permit. Actually, they are attempting to please those who are lining their pockets. Unlike in the Bay Area, quality of life is not considered. Quantity is the only variable in San Diego. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 19, 2010 @ 9:31 a.m.

Response to post #12: Yes, there are two Americas, and the top 1 to 2% rule. It's true in San Diego. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 19, 2010 @ 9:33 a.m.

Response to post #13: The scenario you sketch with China is possible -- and scary. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 19, 2010 @ 9:35 a.m.

Response to post #14: Wall Street would love to get its hands on all that SS money. You're right: suppose it would have succeeded under Bush. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 19, 2010 @ 9:37 a.m.

Response to post #15: Yes, market is reacting negatively to that report. That may be an aberration; stocks these days feed on liquidity, and Bernanke will want to provide more upon digesting that report. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 19, 2010 @ 9:39 a.m.

Response to post #16: Students loans may be the next subprime. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 19, 2010 @ 9:41 a.m.

Response to post #17: I thought real estate values only went up. That mentality caused the last bubble, and the Fed agreed with the thesis. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 19, 2010 @ 9:44 a.m.

Response to post #18: Military recruiters are selling that line to young people. Trouble is, they get shipped off to fight useless wars (Iraq, Afghanistan) and may not survive. Best, Don Bauder

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Dennis Aug. 19, 2010 @ 10:45 a.m.

If the consumer is 70% of the economy & we keep pushing wages downward why should we be surprised that the economy goes in the tank? Minimum wage workers don't buy new cars, houses etc. Average household income of $69k won't qualify you for a mortgage on any house in any SD neighborhood.

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Founder Aug. 19, 2010 @ 11:03 a.m.

Reply #28 Great post, the only folks that are able to buy and buy and buy are those lucky enough to have lots of cash, credit, a good paying job and or friends and family with some or all of the above.

The unemployed "ONCE" Middle Class is either living on borrowed (no pun intended) time in the form of their savings and or home equity or they are trying to figure out where they should be moving to, in order to maximize the small amount of money they have left!

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Don Bauder Aug. 19, 2010 @ 3:17 p.m.

Response to post #28: Profits are strong because companies aren't hiring. But companies don't seem to realize they are destroying their own markets. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 19, 2010 @ 3:19 p.m.

Response to post #29: It's sad but true. Best, Don Bauder

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thestoryteller Aug. 19, 2010 @ 6:01 p.m.

Re: #16 I suppose you mean that the schools are fradulent. I don't think the school my daughter wetn to, U.S. Colleges, was an out-and-out rip off, but they sure as hell didn't tell her there were no jobs to be had. She pretty much expected it because noone else she knows could get a job either.

I would have found out all of this stuff ahead of time, but she didn't take me to the school, she took my dad who was a pushover.

What gets me is how the government gives student loans for school that is an obvious rip-off. Recently, a woman's magazine had an article about a divorced, mother who went to one of these trade schools on a loan, and applied for over 200 jobs and couldn't get arrested. As it turned out, she couldn't take the required test because the school wasn't licensed or accredited and the school said she didn't ask. This was on the east coast.

I've heard that students at schools like Kaplan can't get arrested either. I am very wary of trade schools, and something needs to be done.

Re: #18 My daughter has problems that would preclude her from entering the military. However, she married a young man who is stationed at Pearl Harbor, and is doing well.

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Founder Aug. 19, 2010 @ 7:20 p.m.

Reply #32 about #18

Good for both of them and of course for you and your family.

Here is another suggestion; perhaps she can volunteer at either the Military Base or the local American Red Cross and get OJT (On the job Training) that will allow her to meet folks that will want her to work for them because she is caring (if she is anything like you)!

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Don Bauder Aug. 19, 2010 @ 7:54 p.m.

Response to post #32: The federal government is obviously having second thoughts about all the loans and grants it gives students enrolled in for-profit colleges. But isn't it a little late? Best, Don Baude

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Don Bauder Aug. 19, 2010 @ 7:57 p.m.

Response to post #33: Volunteering is good for job networking. Also, someone interviewing candidates for a job might be impressed that a person took a volunteer job while awaiting full-time employment. Best, Don Bauder

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johnsd Aug. 20, 2010 @ 12:36 a.m.

Student loans will be a major problem. It is unfortunate that many people borrow money to go to college that will be very difficult to pay back. Similar to the lending practices that caused the housing disaster, we have a combination of wishful thinking/ignorance on the part of many borrowers and predatory lending practices on the part of the lenders/colleges. The taxpayer will be left to pick up the pieces and many student lives will be affected.

I do not understand why college costs continue to increase at a much higher rate than inflation. What is causing these higher costs and do they improve the education and the job prospects of the graduates? If not, then those costs should be eliminated. I always looked at college as a means to get a job that paid reasonably well.

I was amazed at how many students are "undecided" and did not know what they wanted to major in. Instead of finishing college in 4 years, they were there for 6-8 years. Living in a city like San Diego, where there are excellent public schools, you can minimize your costs by staying at home and getting a viable degree at a minimal cost--though much more than when I went to school. Far too many kids make it a point to go to a school that is far from home and incur, or their parents, much higher costs than necessary.

It appears that many "for profit" schools are geared to selling a piece of paper. This paper may be beneficial to someone who is already employed, but may not be beneficial to those who are using it to enter the job market. In the old days, the community colleges were excellent at providing skills to get a job that did not require a four-year degree.

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thestoryteller Aug. 20, 2010 @ 12:44 a.m.

Founder and Don, I've asked her why she doesn't volunteer on base, and I don't get a reply. She's in that phase of young adulthood where if it's Mom's idea, it can't be a good one. Since she's grown up, I've apologized to my mom for that phase in MY life.

I am really fed up with the way the government does things. If they give out these student loans, they should make sure that the money goes to schools that our legit. They should protect those people who would go to such schools--most likely young and uneducated.

I am also fed up with the Chelsea King issue, where her parents are fighting for tougher sex offender laws. The problem is not with the laws, the problem is that the parole officers got away with not doing their jobs. There is no accountability in government, and that is what is ultimately going to send us to hell. Having worked for the government, my guess would be that the parole officers didn't want to do the paperwork, and that's why John Gardner was out on the street. Those officers should be fired and/or lose their pensions for not doing their jobs, but you know they won't.

The public is too complacent on these matters. They should picket and revolt. Get together and vote these bad politicians out, but they won't. They'll just eat another Dunkin' doughnut and watch another episode of AI. It's sickening!

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johnsd Aug. 20, 2010 @ 12:55 a.m.

I do not see unemployment improving much. Far too many people were living on borrowed money and will be spending much less now because their homes are no longer a piggy bank that keeps on growing. Housing prices have to reflect the ability of people to pay for them based on their income. Unique places like La Jolla, Coronado, RSF, etc. draw from a national/international clientele and prices will be based more on ego/emotional reasons for those who are already wealthy.

Aside from job insecurity, I am saving more money because government at all levels continues to be irresponsible and is leading us to a financial disaster. We have a voracious public sector that believes that it has first call on what society produces. The uncertainty created by the demand for higher taxes, fees and regulations by people who have never had to meet a payroll or a profit in a competitive environment makes people hesitant to invest and create new jobs. The hostility toward manufacturing by many sectors in society will also not the employment situation. Manufacturing creates noise, does not look pretty from the outside and requires low-cost and reliable energy sources.

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thestoryteller Aug. 20, 2010 @ 12:57 a.m.

This year, I took a couple of courses at Palomar College, and the teachers were so inept, it was shocking. I remember the good ol' days when you actually learned something (the 1970s). The school is on academic probation, and please explain to me why, they are allowed to build a new campus in RB. How sick and crazy is that?

I wrote a letter to the editor about it in the NCT, and received a stern letter from the Office of Student affairs that if I didn't show up for an appointment to discuss the "disruption," my grades would be withheld and I wouldn't be allowed to participate in extra curricular activities. Like I care? I'm 51! What? They aren't going to let me chaperone a dance?

I replied with letter that said it wouldn't be wise to attend the meeting, I would no longer take classes at their school, and if they messed with me further, I'd sue them for violating my right to free speech.

I was shocked to learn that many of the students were from CSUSM. They couldn't get their classes at the university, so they're taking classes at Palomar. It is taking them six years to get a four-year degree. It breaks my heart, and makes me glad my kids chose NOT to go to college. I'm not so sure that these days, they would have gotten anything out of it.

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thestoryteller Aug. 20, 2010 @ 1:04 a.m.

My husband was telling me that Obama is selling bonds to China, which is probably the worst choice he can make. We are already in trouble with our dependancy on the Middle East; I shudder to think what being dependent on China will do.

As Johnsd said above, we are being lead to financial disaster.

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Duhbya Aug. 20, 2010 @ 5:45 a.m.

RE #40: Perhaps you or your husband might check to see that our trade deficit with China grew from $83.8 billion in 2000 to a 2005 total of $201.6 billion. I'm sure you know who was selling bonds to China then. Estimates range between one and three trillion that Bush borrowed from China during his tenure. As recently as two months ago, Japan held just 43 billion less in US Treasuty securities than did China.

http://www.ustreas.gov/tic/mfh.txt

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SurfPuppy619 Aug. 20, 2010 @ 7:56 a.m.

Yes, there are two Americas, and the top 1 to 2% rule. It's true in San Diego. Best, Don Bauder

By dbauder

Don, have you seen this Yale paper yet????? http://pas.sagepub.com/content/38/2/152.full.pdf+html Good read!!!! (BTW-it is 54 pages long, but in a PDF format-you can downloand the paper and read it in sections)

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Founder Aug. 20, 2010 @ 8:03 a.m.

Reply #39 It is not just there, see this great piece on SWC: http://www.sandiegoreader.com/news/2010/aug/17/isolate-expose-avoid/#c70756
School Bond money is being used to build BUILDINGS instead of educate...

And parents wonder why our schools can't do a better job; the truth is that our Schools are being poorly managed and all "our education money" is not being used properly!

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SurfPuppy619 Aug. 20, 2010 @ 8:04 a.m.

I was amazed at how many students are "undecided" and did not know what they wanted to major in. Instead of finishing college in 4 years, they were there for 6-8 years. Living in a city like San Diego, where there are excellent public schools, you can minimize your costs by staying at home and getting a viable degree at a minimal cost--though much more than when I went to school. Far too many kids make it a point to go to a school that is far from home and incur, or their parents, much higher costs than necessary.

By johnsd 12

John, you CANNOT finish school in 4 years at most state institutions b/c you cannot get the classes b/c the school is impacted. It was this way at SDSU over 30 years ago when I went there and tuition was $150 a semester, and it is worse today.

As for living at home, that works if you have a school near your home, many metro areas in CA do not have a state school within a distance to make this possible, BUT even if they did the tuition cost today for the LOWEST cost universities-state universities- run $5K-$40K per year. Those are the cheapest, go to s USD or USC and you can add on much more.

Eduication is not what it used to be here in CA.

Please hit the link in my post in #42 right above-it has an AWESOME breakdown of how the wealthy have co-opted the Congress the last 30 years and wiped out the middle class.

This article from Yale University academics nails why there has been an explosive rise in the superrich in the USA, and the slow collapse of the middle class.

The rise of a well organized busines/gov lobbying infrastructure, which has bought Congress and the White House ever since the late 1970s.

This article goes a step beyond the normal vague comments about the plutocracy and details the specific laws that bought and paid for Congress has done to destroy the middle class including: - collapse of the labor unions - protection of company management against shareholders - massive tax cuts for the rich - special low tax rate of 15% for hedge fund managers

A very depressing, but energizing read. http://pas.sagepub.com/content/38/2/152.full.pdf+html Good stuff

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SurfPuppy619 Aug. 20, 2010 @ 8:06 a.m.

And parents wonder why our schools can't do a better job; the truth is that our Schools are being poorly managed and all "our education money" is not being used properly!

By Founder

Oh, I agree Founder-you're preaching to the chior on this issue!!!!!!

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Don Bauder Aug. 20, 2010 @ 8:07 a.m.

Response to post #36: The hucksters peddling for-profit schools are selling a ticket to future riches, with the government making the loan. But that ticket is often worthless. That is the heart of the problem. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 20, 2010 @ 8:11 a.m.

Response to post #37: I agree that in the case of for-profit colleges, government bureaucrats are not doing their jobs. So what else is new? Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 20, 2010 @ 8:16 a.m.

Response to post #38: Unemployment will not improve as long as companies do not hire. And the government is not providing companies incentives to hire. Why? The Federal Reserve and federal government do not want a brisk recovery, because that would bring high inflation. So certain people suffer. It's going to last a long time. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 20, 2010 @ 8:20 a.m.

Response to post #39: Be sure to save that letter you received from the office of student affairs. It is classic. It might be useful later. Best, Don Bauder

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Founder Aug. 20, 2010 @ 8:21 a.m.

Reply #40 & #41 I expect to see America populated by many more folks from Countries that now hold our "Paper", as these Countries relocate their own citizens to property they own here. Why hire locals when their own workers also need jobs, are only an airplane ride away and really know how to WORK...

Labor intensive jobs will be the first to feel the influx of "Inshoring" from these other Countries.

Example: If a Chinese Company invests in American farm land and their new Managers needs help operating it, why would they not want very happy Chinese farm workers working for them, after being relocated from China to the USA so they can live on the farm?

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Don Bauder Aug. 20, 2010 @ 8:27 a.m.

Response to post #40: We've been selling bonds to China for years. It is the biggest holder of our debt. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 20, 2010 @ 8:30 a.m.

Response to post #41: Yes, China holds a huge percent of our debt. This complicates and exacerbates our relationship with that country. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 20, 2010 @ 8:31 a.m.

Response to post #42: I will give it a read. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 20, 2010 @ 8:38 a.m.

Response to post #43: That's a subject worth investigating. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 20, 2010 @ 8:41 a.m.

Response to post #44: I skimmed the Yale article quickly. It looks good. There are many other similar articles. I have cited many of them in the last several years. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 20, 2010 @ 8:43 a.m.

Response to post #45: But even if one can pin down that bad administration is the main factor plaguing schools, that does not mean that we should cut back education spending. It is critical. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 20, 2010 @ 9:27 a.m.

Response to post #50: There are a lot of possible consequences of foreign countries, particularly China, holding half our debt. Best, Don Bauder

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Founder Aug. 20, 2010 @ 9:44 a.m.

Reply #57 Maybe in reality, since they own so much of US why would they ever want to go to war with US?

Also do you see any analogy between where the the US is now and where Great Britain was just after the Revolutionary War?

Is the US starting to slide, or perhaps it's on it's way ?

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SurfPuppy619 Aug. 20, 2010 @ 11:22 a.m.

Is the US starting to slide, or perhaps it's on it's way ?

We are essentially bankrupt, as a nation, state and city-we have already been flsuhed down the toilet.

The question now is how are we going to get out. There is only one way-cap gov spending and work on rebuilding the middle class backbone of America, our manufacturing base.

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Founder Aug. 20, 2010 @ 11:33 a.m.

Reply #59 I am starting to believe that the Greed of our elected Leaders will stall that effort much like our current Congress is stalling our Nations recovery...

As mentioned above the Ultra Wealthy are now having a great time and our Legislators are making sure they will be well taken care of, when they term limit out, and start enjoying a generous retirement package of benefits, just like our last City Council voted on for themselves...

Our schools better start teaching Chinese, because they will control our future!

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Don Bauder Aug. 20, 2010 @ 12:20 p.m.

Response to post #58: I'm not worried about China attacking us, but I am worried about the U.S. going downhill. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 20, 2010 @ 12:22 p.m.

Response to post #59: We flushed ourselves down the drain. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 20, 2010 @ 12:32 p.m.

Response to post #60: Yes, local, state, and national politicians are in the pockets of the rich. It's no different than it was in the Gilded Age. The unequal distribution of wealth and income is about the same as it was then, too. Best, Don Bauder

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Founder Aug. 20, 2010 @ 1:14 p.m.

The Rich County residents are saying Buy Buy while the Non-Rich County residents say Bye, Bye!

That is the true indicator of our Local Economy

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SurfPuppy619 Aug. 20, 2010 @ 2:17 p.m.

As mentioned above the Ultra Wealthy are now having a great time and our Legislators are making sure they will be well taken care of,

Well, in a nutshell, that is the whole enchilada of the Yale piece; http://pas.sagepub.com/content/38/2/152.full.pdf+html .

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Don Bauder Aug. 20, 2010 @ 3:13 p.m.

Response to post #64: Good point. And the rich are in a tiny and ever-shrinking minority. Despite all their buying of yachts, etc., they don't have enough buying power to sustain the economy. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 20, 2010 @ 3:15 p.m.

Response to post #65: I have seen a lot of papers on wealth and income inequality, and the Yale paper is one of the better ones. Best, Don Bauder

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rshimizu12 Aug. 22, 2010 @ 1:46 a.m.

@66

One reason why the middle class has not benefited more in SD is because the wealthy have not invested in more productive areas. A lot of the wealthy invested in real estate and in the stock market. Real estate investments does not produce a lot of long term jobs for the local economy. We need to lower the cost of doing business and find ways to incenting companies to invest here. I know some very large apt owners in SD and they buy up buildings and sit on the money and collect rent. This does very little to create new jobs.

On a national level we need to cut taxes and dramatically reduce the size of government. Govt is is simply wasteful and Obama seems primarily interested in increasing the size of it.

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johnsd Aug. 22, 2010 @ 3:09 a.m.

John, you CANNOT finish school in 4 years at most state institutions b/c you cannot get the classes b/c the school is impacted. It was this way at SDSU over 30 years ago when I went there and tuition was $150 a semester, and it is worse today.

I respectfully disagree. I received my engineering degree from SDSU in 3.5 years (1978-1981) with a minor in business. I did have AP credits from high school and went to summer school at Mesa College. I did not work when I went to undergraduate school. I finished an MBA at SDSU in 2 years while working full time. Tuition was $99 per semester when I started as an undergraduate and had increased to ~$350 per semester when I finished graduate school. A friend's kid just graduated from UC Davis in 4 years.

Public schools do cost much more today, but there are ways to minimize the cost. Many of the kids at SDSU are from the Bay Area and in Chico they are from Southern California. In both cases, they could have gone to a near-by school and spent less money. I even know of kids going to a community college away from home. Private universities are ridiculously expensive, but can be worth it if the parents can afford them and the student may not be successful in the less than supportive environment at a public university.

About 80% of California's population do live within driving distance of a public university. However, it may not be the best for a specific degree.

I definitely agree that education is not what it used to be here in CA. I also think it is important to understand why it is not. The rise of the teacher's union in K-12 and the bureaucracy at all levels has not helped.

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johnsd Aug. 22, 2010 @ 3:32 a.m.

The economic study is interesting and brings up good points. I agree with their analysis on the Financial Industry and corporate boards and CEO salaries. The influence of special interests on the political class is very destructive. As the power of government has grown, the power of lobbyists has increased. It is not just businesses, but look at the power of the public sector unions and how they are destroying California. Once you get past the top 0.1% or 1.0%, class-warfare demagogues will do far more damage than they ever imagine.

I have worked at a unionized company and at least in my experience, the union is of, by and for the union's management. Working through a strike is not pleasant and can be a lose-lose proposition for the union members. On the other hand, I have friends who work in construction and unions there, or at least the IBEW, are a positive influence. In California, illegal immigration has destroyed the salaries in the construction industry in most areas.

You also have to remember that as consumers we usually do have a choice in what we do. When voting, there is also a choice--through a REAL choice would have to include "NONE OF OF THE ABOVE."

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Don Bauder Aug. 22, 2010 @ 8:22 a.m.

Response to post #67: Real estate investment is not economically productive compared with other investments. If an apartment complex is built, for example, the land is taken out of commission. Jobs are created in construction, but few are created beyond that. On the other hand, if a factory is built and filled with equipment and workers, jobs and products are created in perpetuity, or at least as long as the technology works. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 22, 2010 @ 8:24 a.m.

Response to post #68: Yes, but you got that degree in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Things are different now because of the cutbacks. Courses are simply not available. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 22, 2010 @ 8:28 a.m.

Response to post #69: I do not believe that those who complain about the inequitable incomes and wealth of the top 0.1 to 1% are class warfare demagogues. They -- we -- are realists. The wealth and income inequality -- as bad now as in the Gilded Age -- is economically deleterious. Best, Don Bauder

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SurfPuppy619 Aug. 22, 2010 @ 8:38 a.m.

I respectfully disagree. I received my engineering degree from SDSU in 3.5 years (1978-1981) with a minor in business. I did have AP credits from high school and went to summer school at Mesa College. I did not work when I went to undergraduate school. I finished an MBA at SDSU in 2 years while working full time. Tuition was $99 per semester when I started as an undergraduate and had increased to ~$350 per semester when I finished graduate school. A friend's kid just graduated from UC Davis in 4 years.

You were at SDSU when it was hard, but not impossible to get classes.

I finished in 3 years in the 80's when the school was heavily impacted, taking 20 units per semester the final 3 semesters-since the fulltiem tuition was the same for any amount of units at 12 or more, but it was through nothing but luck that I was able to get the classes, and many had to be taken out of sequence to graduate in the manner I did. This included winter sessions and summer sessions, where the cost was not subsidized by the state-you paid the actual costs for the classes during those sessions.

But I was the EXCEPTION, not the rule. Many, MANY of my friends actually left SDSU after their 1st and 2nd years because of the problem of getting classes. It was and IS a major problem.

UC Davis is not comaprable SDSU. I have no idea how hard it is to get clases there-but UC Davis is not the crown jewel of the UC system, it is not even in 2nd or 3rd place, so it is nto a legit comaprison.

In 1987 SDSU was the largest univesity on the west coast @ 38K students-it has been forced to downsize since then, b/c of the school being severely impacted-it is the crown jewel of the CSU system, and by far the most popular of the CSU schools. SDSU and Long Beach have been trading the top spot for most students for many years now, but SDSU is the oldest and highest ranked CSU school in the system. Alweays has been.

When I started at SDSU tuition was $150/semester-$300 for the year. Tuition today is $5K+ a year, and there is no end in sight for costs......

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SurfPuppy619 Aug. 22, 2010 @ 9:05 a.m.

About 80% of California's population do live within driving distance of a public university.

What do you call "driving distance"???

And then you have to remember that many students do not have access to cars, and must use bicycles or public transportation.

I grew up in the Bay Area, and there was NO public university within 20 miles of my home, not even 30 miles- with the exception of Berkeley, and the fact is just becaue you live in the vicinity of Berkeley or other public school ( 20 miles) does NOT mean you have access to the public university-in fact UC Berkeley is the most selective public university in the nation-not an option for 99% of students.

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Don Bauder Aug. 22, 2010 @ 1:39 p.m.

Response to post #73: UC Davis has an excellent reputation. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 22, 2010 @ 1:45 p.m.

Response to post #74: I would wonder about that 80% figure, but I truly don't know. Is there a public university within 20 miles of Brawley? I don't know. I'm just asking. Best, Don Bauder

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Founder Aug. 22, 2010 @ 4:03 p.m.

Reply #67 I agree only with one part of what you said, YES "we need to cut taxes" but only of everyone making less than $50,000 per year and make up any short fall by taxing the Ultra Wealthy making over 20 million per year. These "Rich" folks would just complain and make more, while the rest of US would then have a chance to "Get Bye" until the US Legislature gets off the dime and frees up consumer credit which will allow the economic engine to restart.

BTW: If that economic engine does not restart soon, all those rich folks may not get a very friendly welcome when they venture outside their palaces! Being rich is only fun if you are not also hated by the masses; as the middle class dwindles, expect to see the frustration rise, even in San Diego...

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SurfPuppy619 Aug. 22, 2010 @ 6:24 p.m.

BTW: If that economic engine does not restart soon, all those rich folks may not get a very friendly welcome when they venture outside their palaces!

Civil unrest is just around the corner, if;

#1) the economy does not improve ( and I am thinking it may not, and then Obama will be a one term president), and;

#2) the poor and what is left of the middle class keep getting screwed over by the Congress and state legislators, who are lap dogs for special interests-mainly Big Buisiness and public unions.

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Don Bauder Aug. 22, 2010 @ 9:08 p.m.

Response to post #77: The superrich should pay more in taxes -- much more, actually. There is no excuse for the lopsided distribution of income and wealth. Higher taxes -- combined with severe criminal penalties for those dodging them, particularly through offshore financial institutions -- would help to right the ship. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 22, 2010 @ 9:11 p.m.

Response to post #78: Technically, SDSU is not supposed to be a research institution. It and the other Cal State schools are supposed to be teaching institutions. But the line has become quite blurred. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 22, 2010 @ 9:15 p.m.

Response to post #79: Republicans are traditionally the business-friendly party. They still are in comparison with Democrats. So if the status quo continues, and the poor people continue to get screwed, Obama may not be in as much trouble as the purported experts now believe. That's particularly true if the Republicans nominate a cerebral cretin, as seems likely now. Best, Don Bauder

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johnsd Aug. 23, 2010 @ 12:54 a.m.

Yes, but you got that degree in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Things are different now because of the cutbacks. Courses are simply not available.

It probably is more difficult today. The bureaucracy is more powerful and there is less emphasis on the student's success. However, when I was in school virtually everybody in the Business College was on the "5-6 year plan" because classes were not "available." As a business minor I could not register for any class because the business majors had priority. I had to "crash" each class that I took. Some days I was in school from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. and I went to school 5 days a week.

Perhaps I was just lucky, but my point is that if people complain about something, it does not mean it is entirely true.

Driving 30-40 miles from home is usually cheaper than room and board at a school, particularly if you cannot stay in the school dormitories. I come from a Latin culture and our values regarding family are different than the predominant Anglo culture. I am not saying or implying that it is either better or worse, just that it is different. I personally think that some aspects are better and others are worse.

To the best of my knowledge there is no school anywhere near Barstow or many rural parts of California. Those who live these areas (20%?) obviously face additional challenges when going to college.

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johnsd Aug. 23, 2010 @ 1:23 a.m.

I do not believe that those who complain about the inequitable incomes and wealth of the top 0.1 to 1% are class warfare demagogues. They -- we -- are realists. The wealth and income inequality -- as bad now as in the Gilded Age -- is economically deleterious.

Perhaps the word demagogue was a bit strong. If the wealth is "ill-gotten" or was obtained gaming the system by paying off politicians as much of Wall Street appears to be, then the criticism is well deserved. However, if the wealth was created by a Steve Jobs, or Irwin Jacobs, or Sergei Brin, or ... then we are all better off for the changes in society they have created. Warren Buffett appears to have created his wealth by being a very astute but principled investor. Speculators and hedge fund managers' wealth is probably not as honest as Mr. Buffett's. He is freely giving his wealth back, but that is his choice and not a government diktat. The fact that he has created a trust fund to distribute his wealth instead of giving it to the government says much more than his statements about the estate tax.

My point is that our system is far from perfect, but compared to others where government "enforces" income equality it is infinitely better. The history of politicians using envy to enhance their power is not a very pretty one. Additionally, there is a world of difference between the top 0.1%, 1% and 10%. I have not been able to find a clear definition of the income and net wealth at each percentage level, such as 0.1%, 0.5%, 1%, 2%, 3%, 4%, 5%, 10%, 15% and 20%. If you happen to have that information, I would appreciate you sharing it.

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Don Bauder Aug. 23, 2010 @ 5:58 a.m.

Response to post #83: Everyone will agree with that statement: if people complain about something, it does not mean it is entirely true. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 23, 2010 @ 6 a.m.

Response to post #84: Oh, I agree: some have made billions relatively honestly: Steve Jobs, Warren Buffett are examples. But they should pay higher taxes. Buffett himself agrees. Best, Don Bauder

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Founder Aug. 23, 2010 @ 9:01 a.m.

Reply #83 & #84 There's is an old saying, "that distance has a way of softening things" which might be true for ones vision, but if it is applied to getting an education then the opposite is true, as you pointed out. By making education more difficult to obtain, (cost, access, adequate Professors etc) less will become educated!

This "dumbing down" of our children is one of the easily measurable effects of the "dumbing up" of our Legislators, an increasingly large number of which, are only figure heads for special interests groups, most of which have enabled them to gain Office, only to make laws and or BIG money for these same Business/Union supporters.

America is now in serious "hot water" and the Middle Class which in the past has acted to quell extremist thought on either side is now starting to get boiling mad, as they continue to get less and are asked to pay for more!

BTW: It might be interesting to note two things:

  1. In China, whenever the price of rice increase beyond what the peasants could afford, there was rebellion.

  2. The US enabled the breakup of the USSR, by outspending them, causing an internal collapse of services to it's people , this is what is now happening in the USA. If we are not very careful, things will get much, much worse here very soon, as folks struggle to pay heating bills and also put some food on their families table, with no job prospect in sight.

I expect to see, ever increasing "Anti-Wealthy" feelings being expounded upon, as folks frustrated with a stalled Congress direct their anger to those that are either not affected or are, worse yet, profiting by our stalled economy. This period of time feels very much like a Financial Blockade of the Middle Class... which could very well lead to a Financial Civil War with those with jobs & money on one side and ever increasing numbers of folks without either on the other side!

Our Global enemies are watching, while we become increasingly our own worse enemy!

This is now the most important question of our time:

Is the USA, "Too Big To Fail"?

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Founder Aug. 23, 2010 @ 9:36 a.m.

Reply #80 If we were able to have a national referendum to avoid going through Congress, then your statement:

"There is no excuse for the lopsided distribution of income and wealth. Higher taxes -- combined with severe criminal penalties for those dodging them, particularly through offshore financial institutions"

would be the masses battle cry for CHANGE; of course it would be found unconstitutional by the SCOTUS, but it would get everyones attention!

Own the Court, Own the Law, Own control over the Masses...

Expect to see "Civil Disobedience" in theaters near you soon...

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Don Bauder Aug. 23, 2010 @ 11:31 a.m.

Response to post #87: I have been expecting a rebellion against the upper 1 or 2% for some time now, but it hasn't happened. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 23, 2010 @ 11:34 a.m.

Response to post #88: It may be too complex for the public to grasp. Best, Don Bauder

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SurfPuppy619 Aug. 23, 2010 @ 2:19 p.m.

2. The US enabled the breakup of the USSR, by outspending them, causing an internal collapse of services to it's people , this is what is now happening in the USA.

Funny-I was thinking this exact same thing a few weeks back, we BKed the USSR with an arms race basically, and today we are now BKing ourselves with out of control spending, and the writing is on the wall-many people have and are firing off loud warning shots.

I read today that the democratic Congress (and Obama) was working on a bill to BAILOUT private pension funds! I have been pretty outraged with these "bailouts", always going to the connected few (Big banks/Wall Street/ teachers Unions) and if there are any more of these bailouts I think it will be the end of the Obama administration.

I voted for the guy and will give him a full 4 years to turn the economy around-but I am so infuriated at these bailouts for the connected that my blood is boiling. I will NOT be voting for Obama again unless there are some serious changes in the next 18 months-much more serious than the ones we have seen to date,

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David Dodd Aug. 23, 2010 @ 2:38 p.m.

@ #91: You might as well start looking now for another candidate to back. The Obama administration is not going to to anything differently than it has been doing for the last 2 1/2 years. The economists advising that administration are all hard-line neo-Keynesians.

Q: How many neo-Keynesians does it take to change a lightbulb?

A: Print more money.

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Founder Aug. 23, 2010 @ 2:49 p.m.

91 SP

Looks like we need to do something!

I never imagines that what is happening in SD is also true of the ENTIRE USA.

Any suggestions?

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Founder Aug. 23, 2010 @ 2:52 p.m.

Reply #92 RFG

If the Rep. run another loser and the Dems get another "unwell" hung Congress, life in the USA might start looking like Russia after their collapse!

Hang on folks, the road ahead is looking rough for everyone except the Wealthy!

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SurfPuppy619 Aug. 23, 2010 @ 3:32 p.m.

The Obama administration is not going to to anything differently than it has been doing for the last 2 1/2 years.

Then Obama better hope for the kind of luck Ronnie Raygun had-where his first 2 years were a disaster but the tide tunred bigtime the last two. If that happens Obama will be OK-but that is a long shot IMO.

People have lost jobs, are losing eberything they own and the only ones doing good are the connected few-which look to me like the top 5% and gov employees. And the public is scared to death I think.

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SurfPuppy619 Aug. 23, 2010 @ 3:32 p.m.

If the Rep. run another loser and the Dems get another "unwell" hung Congress, life in the USA might start looking like Russia after their collapse!

Things are pretty bad, I hope they improve. I am thinking Russia today is more democratic than we are.......

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David Dodd Aug. 23, 2010 @ 3:39 p.m.

"Things are pretty bad, I hope they improve. I am thinking Russia today is more democratic than we are......."

That's an interesting observation. I keep trying to point this sort of thing out and I'm met with this Nationalistically defensive crowd, but democracy is a lot like ice cream, chocolate and strawberry are just different flavors of the same product. It could easily be argued that Russia's economy is more capitalistic than that of the U.S.

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nan shartel Aug. 23, 2010 @ 4:40 p.m.

the middle class has become the upper lower class due to the Economic downswing...this leaves no buffer between the two classes

The reality is that no matter how smart, how strong, how educated or how hard working American workers are... they just cannot compete with people who are desperate to put in 10 to 12 hour days at less than a dollar an hour on the other side of the world

After all, what corporation in their right mind is going to pay an American worker ten times more (plus benefits) to do the same job?

The world is fundamentally changing. Wealth and power are rapidly becoming concentrated at the top and the big global corporations are making massive amounts of money...their greed is unquenchable

Meanwhile the American middle class is being systematically wiped out of existence as U.S. workers are slowly being merged into the new "global" labor pool

outsourcing has stolen any possibility an American middle class worker of competing for work that just doesn't exist for him/her in this country any longer...so getting used to unemployment will become the norm...until the money runs out and then who know what that the disenfranchise middle class will do

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David Dodd Aug. 23, 2010 @ 4:43 p.m.

"until the money runs out and then who know what that the disenfranchise middle class will do"

Well, my guess is that they're going to vote very differently from this point on. At least, based on history, people tend to take it out on the party in power.

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nan shartel Aug. 23, 2010 @ 4:44 p.m.

are there any champions that can be voted into office that will correct this trend...i certainly hope so...but i doubt it

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nan shartel Aug. 23, 2010 @ 4:59 p.m.

99

Corporate America is in many ways the puppeteer of both parties...so blaming it on the party in power is often not clear minded reasoning

unfortunately the public at larges ability to delve into and find the REAL reasons is clouded

the backroom monetarily funded reasons we are being sold out by corporate America hasn't been easy to discover...but it's becoming easier and easier as we have more incentives to look into them

as we lose our homes...jobs..and class....as we look personal desperation in the face...and realize we better do something about it

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Founder Aug. 23, 2010 @ 5:07 p.m.

The Ultra Wealthy are now doing exactly what the "connected did when Russia split up gobbling up all the goodies while the masses got left standing in line!

New access to powerful Leaders and Big money will redefine our landscape...

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Don Bauder Aug. 23, 2010 @ 5:38 p.m.

Response to post #91: By attempting to bail out the pension funds, the administration is bailing out the states. Would you let California, Illinois and New Jersey go under? Some of the bailouts should have been avoided -- agreed. Some of the banks should have gone BK. Many of the derivatives should have been allowed to go under, despite a possible chain reaction. (Remember, most of these bailouts were perpetrated under Bush.) But if California and other states default, the whole country may go down, too. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 23, 2010 @ 5:40 p.m.

Response to post #92: Again, a reminder: most of the bailout mischief was done under George W. Bush. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 23, 2010 @ 5:42 p.m.

Response to post #93: Well, for one thing, you could read. Now that the U-T seems finally to be grasping that San Diego has fallen apart financially, it may start covering the U.S. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 23, 2010 @ 5:44 p.m.

Response to post #94: That path was obvious several years ago. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 23, 2010 @ 5:48 p.m.

Response to post #95: Obama would be wise to keep reminding people that this mess started under Bush. The debt binge, two useless wars, and the tax cuts for the superrich were all his doing. The bailouts were largely Bush's. Obama has to get that across. His next best hope is that the Republicans will nominate a congenital idiot, which seems likely now. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 23, 2010 @ 5:49 p.m.

Response to post #96: You're wrong there. Russia is NOT more democratic than the U.S. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 23, 2010 @ 5:52 p.m.

Response to post #97: The U.S. system is basically corporate socialism. The systems in Russia, Japan, and most of Europe are quite similar. China? That is an interesting one. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 23, 2010 @ 5:55 p.m.

Response to post #98: Good points, well argued. This is certainly true in manufacturing, which we have already lost. Some service industries are at least somewhat sheltered from foreign competition. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 23, 2010 @ 5:59 p.m.

Response to post #99: Before the Civil War, there was a movement in the U.S. that became known as the Mugwumps. Their positions lacked logic and consistency, but one thing they opposed was more immigration. And they heaped scorn on existing immigrant groups. I think they had a lot in common with today's Tea Baggers. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 23, 2010 @ 6:02 p.m.

Response to post #100: As long as politicians both locally and nationally are owned by big business, there is not much hope that good ones will emerge. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 23, 2010 @ 6:04 p.m.

Response to post #101: I thought the national election of 2008 was a sign that the people were beginning to speak up, but then Obama put the Old Guard back into power. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 23, 2010 @ 6:08 p.m.

Response to post #102: All we have to do is stop electing greedy politicians and start electing high-minded and publicly conscientious ones. Good luck. Best, Don Bauder

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SurfPuppy619 Aug. 23, 2010 @ 9:11 p.m.

By nan 4:40 p.m., Aug 23, 2010 =====

NAN!!! That was an AWESOME post at 4:40 PM!!.........YOU NAILED IT!!!

Me and you are seeing eye to eye on these issues-thank you for exposing these current schemes destroying our nation.....!!!!!!

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SurfPuppy619 Aug. 23, 2010 @ 9:17 p.m.

Well, my guess is that they're going to vote very differently from this point on. At least, based on history, people tend to take it out on the party in power.

If Obama does not get the country rolling, and STOP these bailouts for the well connected (who are already doing much better than the average taxpayer) like Big Business and gov employees, then I am not voting for him again, or any other democrat . I'll vote Independant or Republican-hard to believe I said that......

I cannot believe how far the democratic party has strayed from their core values-all within the last 20 years.

I cannot believe I was ONCE a hardcore dem (from age 18 until just a few years ago......).

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SurfPuppy619 Aug. 23, 2010 @ 9:24 p.m.

Would you let California, Illinois and New Jersey go under? ....... But if California and other states default, the whole country may go down, too. Best, Don Bauder

By dbauder

Yes, I certainly woudl let CA and any other fiscally irresponsible state go under-why should the poor bailout the rich-or very well off gov employees?????? It is a reality that must be addressed-over comped employees-and the budget deficits are ongoing-next years is supposed to be $30 billion, on top of the $20 billion this year and the $60 billion last year-this simply has to be addressed by cold, hard fiscal restraint on spending, and that will not happen with federal bailouts...

If we start bailing out CA and other states we most certainly will bring down the country-but I am not sure that allowing states like CA to repudiate their debts would do that.....so, yes, let CA go down, lets see what happens, it is better than a bailout.

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thestoryteller Aug. 23, 2010 @ 10:28 p.m.

If I'm forced to choose between a Mormon and a moose killer in 2012, I'll vote for Obama all over again, and let what's left of the country go completely to Hell. It's the easiest way to die, as far as I am concerned.

Palin's popularity is frightening. It's going to take a lot more than a cute pit bull joke and showing a little knee to save us. And I refuse to walk twenty steps behind a man, even if he is the president.

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johnsd Aug. 23, 2010 @ 11:43 p.m.

A slightly different perspective on the discussion above is Mr. Codevilla's article: America's Ruling Class -- And the Perils of Revolution By Angelo M. Codevilla http://spectator.org/archives/2010/07/16/americas-ruling-class-and-the

I completely agree with his comment that "differences between Bushes, Clintons, and Obamas are of degree, not kind." By dividing the conflict into "Ruling Class" and "Country Class" instead of Republican/Democratic Mr. Codevilla's position can be understood in a more objective manner. His revised book "The Character of Nations" is also well worth reading.

A book I am currently reading may also be of interest: "The Next American Civil War, The Populist Revolt Against the Liberal Elite" by Lee Harris.

The writings of Mr. Victor Davis Hanson (www.victorhanson.com) are "conservative" but from historical and "common man" perspective.

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johnsd Aug. 23, 2010 @ 11:49 p.m.

The link to Mr. Codevilla's article did not work. This link takes you to the home page and the article is accessible from there. http://spectator.org/

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johnsd Aug. 24, 2010 @ 12:06 a.m.

Would you let California, Illinois and New Jersey go under? ....... But if California and other states default, the whole country may go down, too.

Although you may be right about the implications of these large and fiscally irresponsible states becoming bankrupt, the consequences of letting them continue the fiscally irresponsible manner is worse in the long run. The overall state of the economy has contributed to the current difficulties, but these states are like a drug addict and would be in the same position in a better economy--it would just have taken a few more years.

California can get out of this disaster if it were to seriously address the causes of the deficit: 1) Very high total compensation for a very large bureaucracy that is self serving. 2) No controls on the demand for social services, particularly by individuals who may not even be legally entitled to them. 3) Generate revenues by making California an attractive place to have a business and thus increase the revenues received.

I would like for California to be successful because it is a beautiful place to live. Unfortunately I do not think much will change for quite a while. Just look at Argentina. At the turn of the 20th century it was one of the 2 or 3 wealthiest countries in the world and today it is a third world country with a first world veneer. It has been all self-inflicted starting with the election of Peron.

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thestoryteller Aug. 24, 2010 @ 12:16 a.m.

johnsd--Thanks for the references.

Don--Don't forget that the Clinton administration were the ones who forced the banks to loan to minorities, who couldn't afford the loans. The whole thing has blown up in their proverbial faces.

Callaway golf is moving to Mexico. I think that some companies should move there and employ Mexican labor to keep costs of illegal immigration down in this country. However, we really need to revise the tax policies for manufacturing, so that we can compete globally.

Here is a strange irony. My mother's housekeeper is illegal, however she is married to a legal resident who recently got laid off from Callaway Golf. They bought a house in Escondido--the American dream--and now may lose it, because the company is moving to Mexico.

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Don Bauder Aug. 24, 2010 @ 6:13 a.m.

Response to post #115: Nan did a terrific job. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 24, 2010 @ 6:15 a.m.

Response to post 116: The Dems' move to the center maneuvered by Clinton was simply a surrender to greed. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 24, 2010 @ 6:20 a.m.

Response to post #117: How would you suggest the courts handle the default of California? Where should the judge make the cuts? Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 24, 2010 @ 6:23 a.m.

Response to post #118: Palin's popularity is an ugly reflection on the U.S. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 24, 2010 @ 6:25 a.m.

Response to post 119: Sounds like an interesting approach. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 24, 2010 @ 6:28 a.m.

Response to post #120: OK. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 24, 2010 @ 6:30 a.m.

Response to post #121: The three problems you cite definitely contribute to California's woes, but they aren't the only factors. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 24, 2010 @ 6:33 a.m.

Response to post #122: You want MORE U.S. companies to send their manufacturing to other countries? Best, Don Bauder

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SurfPuppy619 Aug. 24, 2010 @ 8:30 a.m.

How would you suggest the courts handle the default of California? Where should the judge make the cuts?

The states don't need to have a judge involved, they are immune from lawsuit per the 11th Amendment-they could come up with a plan on their own.

I have laid out MY plan in the past. I would cut pensions AND salary progressively.

If you were making over $100K in SALARY I would cut 25%, $60K-$100K I would cut 15%, under $60K 5%.

ALL pensions over $100K would be cut down to $75K-ALL of them. Pensions between $60K and $100K would get a 30% haircut. No cuts in pensions $60K or below.

I would rescind all "retirements" before the age or 65-including all cop/FF's who love to make the claim they cannot continue in the job at that age-if they truly could not I would find some other job to utilize their skills until age 65. (BTW the UT "Watchdog" ran a piece on all the high paid City pensioners who were double dipping, many raking in over half a million with their retirement and current jobs, so the claim they cannot conitinue is a bogus one anyway).

Gov pensions were NEVER intented to make unskilled/semi-skilled gov employees millionairs in retirement-if they want that kind of money they can start a private business and earn it on their own.

That is a progressive plan that would solve all the states fiscal problems. A simple, safe and trageted plan that would work, nothing more would be needed.

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nan shartel Aug. 24, 2010 @ 9:33 a.m.

WHEW!!!

Surfpuppy...u know lot's more then how to ride a surfboard...this looks like a good site to follow the bouncing ball of pensions http://www.pensiontsunami.com/

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Don Bauder Aug. 24, 2010 @ 9:33 a.m.

Response to post #131: The problem with your solution, as you know, is that a very high percentage of government employees vote. Also, judges are government employees. And don't you think you should adjust the tax system so the superrich have to carry a larger share of the burden than they are now? Best, Don Bauder

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nan shartel Aug. 24, 2010 @ 9:36 a.m.

133

of course we need to do that Don...but some politicians will have to grow a spine to accomplish that

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Don Bauder Aug. 24, 2010 @ 9:36 a.m.

Response to post #132: There is a lot of information out there on excessive pensions. I wish there were as much political will to do something. Best, Don Bauder

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Duhbya Aug. 24, 2010 @ 10:15 a.m.

After observing the ratio of comments posted to Don's missives recently, I think this journal should consider changing its name to "The San Diego Readabauder".

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Founder Aug. 24, 2010 @ 11:13 a.m.

136

How about, "SDReader is Don Bauder Online"

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nan shartel Aug. 24, 2010 @ 11:51 a.m.

Duhbya....totally astute of u....he is the one and only READER comment KING!!!!!

how about Don Bauder Online IS the SD Reader

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nan shartel Aug. 24, 2010 @ 11:53 a.m.

~~will be right back with a bigger hat size for ya Mr Bauder~~

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SurfPuppy619 Aug. 24, 2010 @ 12:13 p.m.

After observing the ratio of comments posted to Don's missives recently, I think this journal should consider changing its name to "The San Diego Readabauder".

==========================

The San Diego Readabauder does have a catchy ring to it...................

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SurfPuppy619 Aug. 24, 2010 @ 12:18 p.m.

Surfpuppy...u know lot's more then how to ride a surfboard...this looks like a good site to follow the bouncing ball of pensions http://www.pensiontsunami.com/

By nan

Thank you Nan.

I have forwarded a few of Don's columns to Jack Dean, the guy who runs www.Pensiontsunami.com , sometimes he puts them on the site, sometimes he doesn't.

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SurfPuppy619 Aug. 24, 2010 @ 12:30 p.m.

And don't you think you should adjust the tax system so the superrich have to carry a larger share of the burden than they are now? Best, Don Bauder

Yes I do, especially capital gains taxes. which are taxed far too low. Far below what the labor tax rate of a $40K taxpayer.

I would look at the coprorate tax rate and also the TOP tax rate, which I think is currently at 39%. 39% is close to where I think it should be, but loopholes lower that 39% drastically-so maybe a small 5% boost while closing the loop holes.

I would also start placing tariffs on ALL imported goods, level the playing field for our workers.

I would then go after companies that are placing their HQers in foriegn countries to deprive USA tax receipts.

Then I would go after the indiustries paying NO TAXES, like the cruise ship industry. I would charge a tax on all income derived from US customers no matter what country the ship is flagged under.

Next would be a good look at the so called "non profits", which also pay NO TAXES. When the NFL can claim non profit status and not pay taxes we have a problem.

I would turn over every rock and stone there is-while capping and freezing ALL gov salary and benefits for 5 years-all the surplus would go to retire the national debt.

If the debt was not paid off in 5 years I would keep the freeze in place.

That is my plan, and I would make it work.

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Don Bauder Aug. 24, 2010 @ 1:27 p.m.

Response to post #136: No comment. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 24, 2010 @ 1:31 p.m.

Response to posts #137-141: You people can take credit for it. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 24, 2010 @ 1:43 p.m.

Response to poste #142: How about the yachts that dodge local taxes because they are registered in a tax havens? Best, Don Bauder

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Evelyn Aug. 24, 2010 @ 2:04 p.m.

Surfpuppy619 for president in 2012. . . Or at least for City Council or a local position?

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Don Bauder Aug. 24, 2010 @ 7:49 p.m.

Response to post #146: SP, you have one vote. Your own would make it two. You're on your own. Best, Don Bauder

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Burwell Aug. 24, 2010 @ 9:06 p.m.

As I have related before, my g/f received her Master's in Architecture at Cal and our daughter is about to begin her final year of the UCLA School of Theatre, Film and Television Master's program.

My barber's son graduated from the UCLA School of Theatre, Film and Television Master's program 5 years ago. The son is currently employed at Disneyland earning $11 an hour.

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David Dodd Aug. 24, 2010 @ 9:09 p.m.

My barber's son graduated from the UCLA School of Theatre, Film and Television Master's program 5 years ago. The son is currently employed at Disneyland earning $11 an hour.

============

Sure, but he works at the happiest place on Earth! And you know what they say, that money can't buy happiness...

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SurfPuppy619 Aug. 24, 2010 @ 10:41 p.m.

How about the yachts that dodge local taxes because they are registered in a tax havens?

Of course.

No rock or stone would be left unturned, our future, the future of our country depends on it.

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SurfPuppy619 Aug. 24, 2010 @ 10:46 p.m.

My barber's son graduated from the UCLA School of Theatre, Film and Television Master's program 5 years ago. The son is currently employed at Disneyland earning $11 an hour.

That's a damn good wage in this economy.

Plus Disney pays excellent benefits (although they have had problems with their hospitality employees recently).

There was recently a PART TIME position open in a local So Cal water agency, like 20 hours per week (OK-so utilities are the best gov jobs), and the HR manager received 440 applications for it. 440 applications for a part time gov job.

I would hate to see how many applications the FD is getting for a FF job, well into the thousands.

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David Dodd Aug. 25, 2010 @ 1:21 a.m.

"...and the Mexican culture has taken over."

It was here long before you were, or your aunt. And it will remain here long after we're all gone.

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Don Bauder Aug. 25, 2010 @ 6:22 a.m.

Response to post #148: And he is luckier than some. Hollywood is full of would-be actors and producers waiting tables -- if they can get a job at all. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 25, 2010 @ 6:27 a.m.

Response to posts #149-151: Starting at the bottom in Southern California is better than starting at the top in Youngstown, Ohio. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 25, 2010 @ 6:29 a.m.

Response to post #152: But remember: this is a plutonomy. We don't discommode the superrich in any way. Certainly we do not ask them to pay taxes. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 25, 2010 @ 6:32 a.m.

Response to post #153: But the FFs say that if they can't keep their fat pensions, they will leave and go elsewhere. Where? Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 25, 2010 @ 6:35 a.m.

Response to post #154: Oh yes, millions are being made in the film industry. Nobody denies that. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 25, 2010 @ 6:40 a.m.

Response to post #155: The Mexican immigrants have taken over some meatpacking towns because Americans won't take those demeaning jobs with low wages. It happens in other industries, too. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 25, 2010 @ 6:41 a.m.

Response to post #156: Correct. Read history. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 25, 2010 @ 6:43 a.m.

Response to post #157: It appears that the sentiments you express are the driving forces behind the Tea Party movement. Best, Don Bauder

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SurfPuppy619 Aug. 25, 2010 @ 7:12 a.m.

Well, I'm encouraged. My husband currently makes $15hour part-time, and I thought that was depressing. Now I've learned it's better than a "damn good wage in this economy." I may not jump off the nearest bridge after all.

$15 an hour-especially for a part time job- is far above average. And given the 25% U-6 unemployment rate it is pretty good. That is more than substitute teachers make in the SDUSD, who have 6 years of college under their belts.

I know people who have been out of work for over 2 years and would die for a $15 hour job.

If you don't mind-can you disclose what type of job it is>?

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Founder Aug. 25, 2010 @ 7:19 a.m.

Reply#161 If any FF's leave it will ONLY be the ones already to retire...

Sure a few may leave, but who in their right mind would give up a job in this economy that (and I agree with SP here) MANY HUNDREDS of qualified folks would thank their lucky stars for getting, even at half the current salary!

BTW: Many trained FF's either in (or getting out of) the Military or now living in another less desirable part of the US would also apply even for "entry" positions...

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SurfPuppy619 Aug. 25, 2010 @ 7:21 a.m.

But the FFs say that if they can't keep their fat pensions, they will leave and go elsewhere. Where?

The police say that too. All gov employees say that. They also say they need to comp these semi skilled "public safety" positions @ $200K per year to get the best "qualified" employee. These are just baloney talking points with no factual basis to support them.

The City Manager of Bell, a City with a $15 million budget and 37K residents with a median income of $27K, was being comped $1.5 million and said he could make MORE if he were in the private sector- that is a perposterous statement on its face. Same with these FF/cop talking points. You know the used to say they all die 2-3 years after they retire-they USED to say that until Calpers releseased their mortality rates and proved they live just as long as everyone else does. Talkign points, thats all.

If this City/gov were running a Taco Bell in Mission Valley they would be paying the front counter kid $80K per year with a $50K fringe benefits package making the claim they need to pay that to get a "qualified employee"...........................

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SurfPuppy619 Aug. 25, 2010 @ 7:30 a.m.

The Mexican immigrants have taken over some meatpacking towns because Americans won't take those demeaning jobs with low wages. It happens in other industries, too.

I don't want to get into a race debate on these issues, but will make one comment (no, two actually).

1) The reason Americans are reluctant to take jobs today in the agri/construction/hospitality/landscaping/meat packing/etc. industries is because wages have been driven down to the point that the income is not enough to live or survive on, forcing the meployee to look for a higher paying job elsehwere. The reason for that is the influx of unskilled immigrant workers. If the employer did not have these unskilled immigrant workers they would be forced to may a more equitable/market wage. Would costs go up-yes, but I don't know if that is bad.

2) Mexico used to OWN CA-all of it, to the OR border, along with AZ, New Mexico and parts of Utah. Escondido was a Mexican "Ranchero" a 150 years ago. And the native Americans were here BEFORE Mexico was. So these comments about who was here first have a back end to them. Indians and meicans can make the same claims about who was here first.

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Founder Aug. 25, 2010 @ 8:11 a.m.

Reply #168 Right On Comment SP, and you have done all of US a favor by posting some salary numbers which once seen, cut through the hype and spin, (by the Unions and others) like a knife in hot butter...

Perhaps you would also consider posting some the job titles and salaries of the FF's, PD and any others in the City that are "preposterous", like the Greedy City Manager of Bell.

Once folks see the numbers they will see through the "Talking Points" and start asking our City Council WHY?

Then maybe voters will even ask what they are paying themselves, now that the last City Council linked their salary to those of the Judges so their increases are automatic ($MART thinking for themselves and done just as most left Office)!

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Don Bauder Aug. 25, 2010 @ 10:17 a.m.

Response to post #166: Do you suppose her husband is a nuclear scientist making $15 an hour? Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 25, 2010 @ 10:20 a.m.

Response to post #167: Most San Diegans have to live with psychic incomes -- that is, low wages that hurt because of the high cost of living. It is not true of firefighters, who enjoy high wages, very early retirements, and extremely generous pensions. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 25, 2010 @ 10:26 a.m.

Response to post #168: Those talking points spread around by the public sector unions should be scrutinized. Ditto for statements claiming that private sector CEOs deserve $15 million a year. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 25, 2010 @ 10:31 a.m.

Response to post #169: The reasons wages have been driven down in those industries are not simply a result of an influx of immigrants. Management's greed -- the desire to maximize profits -- is another reason. The way to control illegal immigration is to arrest U.S. employers who hire those who have entered the country illegally. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 25, 2010 @ 10:36 a.m.

Response to post #170: The only way the word will get out on excessive pay and pensions of government workers is to educate, educate, educate. Speakers should be going throughout the city talking with groups. The same should be done on the role of CCDC steering money downtown -- for crooked deals such as the Chargers will demand. A speakers bureau is necessary. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 25, 2010 @ 10:38 a.m.

Response to post #172: This is a good idea for people on both sides of the fence. Best, Don Bauder

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David Dodd Aug. 25, 2010 @ 11:33 a.m.

"Don't bring up history, or any other b.s."

Right. We wouldn't want to let any inconvenient facts get in the way of a good old-fashioned phobia. The very irony that you live in a place called "Escondido", and the fact that the land was originally owned by Juan Alvarado via a MEXICAN land grant is enough for me.

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Founder Aug. 25, 2010 @ 1:18 p.m.

Reply #172 Thanks for the link, I'll check it out...

Comments with links to actual facts & data are wonderful because they cut through the "fog" of spin warfare...

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Don Bauder Aug. 25, 2010 @ 5 p.m.

Response to post #178: Look at it this way: even if there were no Hispanics in San Diego, there would be an Hispanic culture. Look at the street names. Look at the architecture. Who got to San Diego first? Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 25, 2010 @ 5:02 p.m.

Response to post #79: No spin warfare here....ha ha ha. Best, Don Bauder

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Burwell Aug. 25, 2010 @ 7:47 p.m.

Editors, agents, producers are dying for new talent. If a person hasn't made it, it's because they aren't good enough, haven't met the right person, or both.

=============

There's rampant ethnic discrimination in the entertainment industry. If you're not part of the right group, you are unemployable no matter how good you are.

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Don Bauder Aug. 25, 2010 @ 8:17 p.m.

Response to post #182: Logistically speaking, you couldn't send all the meatpacking plants to Mexico. They are needed at strategic spots all around the U.S. How would you get all those cows and bulls to Mexico? The same would be true for crops which are plucked by Mexican labor. We couldn't move all those crops to Mexico if we wanted to. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 25, 2010 @ 8:21 p.m.

Response to poste #183: That's often the excuse for greed: we were forced to do it by our competitors. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 25, 2010 @ 8:23 p.m.

Response to post #184: There is also rampant ageism in Hollywood. They only want to hire the young, and not just for acting jobs -- for producer posts, etc. Best, Don Bauder

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rshimizu12 Aug. 25, 2010 @ 11:17 p.m.

175, SP

DB: We should fine the employers 100,000 per illegal alien and implements a tip rewards program. The tipster would get 50,000 per illegal. We could eliminate a lot of illegal immigration this way.

SP: There is a lot of people in construction industry because the illegals come over hear and undercut their wages. The some contractors who hire only Mexicans. A few years back a study came out that said: 70% of the construction industry is Hispanic's and 50% of those were illegal aliens.

We send the illegals back and let those come back where they are needed. It's ridiculous to let illegal immigration run rampant when unemployment is so high.

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Don Bauder Aug. 26, 2010 @ 6:30 a.m.

Response to post #188: Hollywood is extremely sensitive to fads. My guess is that it doesn't start fads, it jumps on them. Reason? Bottom line. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 26, 2010 @ 6:35 a.m.

Response to post #189: We live ten miles outside of a town named Salida.It is pronounced SalEYEda -- not the Spanish pronunciation. Sixteen miles from us is a town named Buena Vista. Pronunciation? You won't believe this: BYOOnavista, sometimes shortened to BYOOnie. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 26, 2010 @ 6:38 a.m.

Response to post #190: Construction is one of the industries with the heaviest concentration of illegals. Yes, employers should be punished. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 26, 2010 @ 9:12 p.m.

Response to post #114: If Wal-Mart didn't import something like 90% of its products from China, we wouldn't have the problems we have, too. But we have to deal with the real world. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 26, 2010 @ 9:16 p.m.

Response to post #195: You could make that Hollywood 1920, 1930, 1940, etc. all the way up to the present. Best, Don Bauder

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Twister Aug. 31, 2010 @ 11:22 p.m.

Re: 10

So, if the banks are getting richer via the plutonomy, which is like an "overground" economy, and the trickle-down heads toward a wage-stabilization roughly equal to the cost of "foreign" labor, would that result in a depression in prices for the resulting bottom-feeders (ex-Lexus drivers, etc.)? That is, could there be a stable or slightly inflationary plutonomy and a depressed impoverishonomy everywhere else in the spectrum?

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Don Bauder Sept. 2, 2010 @ 8:38 p.m.

Response to post #198: Yes, unfortunately, income and wealth disparity is so cancerous that the scenario you describe is, unfortunately, possible. We're getting there now. Best, Don Bauder

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FedUpAmerican March 16, 2011 @ 7:03 a.m.

'The military, which has always been a big part of the economy, “will probably slacken a bit with the drawdown of military spending,” says Cunningham. Research jobs in tech, biotech, and telecom are holding up well, but some of those jobs are going to countries such as India and China. “I always thought the smart people wanted to live here, but now biotechs are finding they can do that kind of research for much lower expenses” in foreign countries, he says.'

Well, let's connect these two dots (among many that are connected) in our economy. The military needs tax revenues for its ever-bloating budget and expenditures, especially with its operations in Iraq and Afghanistan still going on and with no real end to either in sight (despite Obama's "promise"). But, when Corporate America is selling out to foreign countries for their own quick, big profits, by selling out more and more high-paying jobs to them, we know that translates to more unemployed Americans and less incomes for those that are employed that, in turn, translates to less taxes paid to support the military, as well as all other government entities. In a nutshell, it's really that simple, folks! And I can't help but wonder how many of the domestic students who graduate from UCSD that boasts perhaps one of the best biotech programs in the U.S., if not in the world, are fortunate enough to be hired by the San Diego biotech firms.

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