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Soon after, Dr. Ferris said a closing prayer, and McPherson, “walking as though on the deck of a heaving vessel,” fled to the courtesy car.

Throughout her career, McPherson swore she wasn’t a miracle worker. She wanted to save souls, not cure ailments. “Jesus is the healer,” she repeated often. “I’m only the office girl who opens the door and says, “Come in.” Of the San Diego revivals, which vaulted her into the national spotlight, she wrote: “No wonder that in certain instances where Jesus healed the sick, he commanded them to tell no man of it.”

QUOTATIONS
1. Rolf McPherson: “It was a phenomenon peculiar to the times…Patients had more faith in God because they had less faith in science.”

  1. Charlie Chaplin [to McPherson]: “Whether you like it or not, you’re a great actress [giving] your drama-starved people, who absent themselves from the theater through fear, a theater they can reconcile with their narrow beliefs.”

  2. McPherson: “Few people know as I did what it is to be lonely in a crowd.”

SOURCES
Blumhofer, Edith, Aimee Semple McPherson: Everybody’s Sister, Grand Rapids, 1993.

Epstein, Daniel Mark, Sister Aimee: The Life of Aimee Semple McPherson, New York, 1993.

McPherson, Aimee Semple, This Is That, Los Angeles, 1923; In the Service of the King, New York, 1927.

McWilliams, Carey, “Sunlight in My Soul,” The Asprin Age: 1919–1941, ed. Isabel Leighton, New York, 1949.

Morris, B. J., “The Revivals of Aimee Semple McPherson,” Pacific Christian Advocate, Oct. 5, 1921.

Sutton, Matthew Avery, Aimee Semple McPherson and the Resurrection of Christian America, Cambridge, 2007.

Szasz, Ferenc Morton, Religion in the Modern American West, Tucson, 2000.

…articles from the San Diego Union, the San Diego Sun, and the Los Angeles Times.


GO TO When Sister Aimee Came Town, Part 1

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