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Encina anticipates supplying biofuel to a cement company sometime this summer, when the company’s equipment has been adapted to burn the alternative fuel. And Hogan expects that in the next few months an agreement will be reached with local municipalities to use the pellets for fertilizer.

Although Hogan doubts Encina will make a profit selling the pellets, there are other benefits. “We’re not going to generate enough revenue to offset operating costs, but that $2.2 million we spent in transportation costs becomes much smaller.”

It will be the end to sending five truckloads of biosolids to Yuma County every week, which is a good thing, says Yuma County environmental health manager Rick Stacks.

“I’m one of those believers that thinks if California generates it, they ought to treat it themselves, instead of shipping it off to someone else. Instead, they’d rather flush it, then forget it.”

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Comments

Twister May 1, 2009 @ 10:57 p.m.

Biosolids, my aspidistra. Full of toxic st. Save the millions of subsidies and spread the wealth rather than concentrate it. Composting toilets, if they weren't opposed by the st lobbyists, could do better more efficiently. At least it's your own and you know what's in it.

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SDaniels May 1, 2009 @ 11:14 p.m.

You know what's in your own only if you know what kinds of drugs are currently running through your city's water. How much progesterone, methamphetamine, how many flavors of antibiotic...

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