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Talking about the painted Packard reminds Van Weelden of a story. "I could not get this guy," she taps the mural just below the dark-haired driver of the Packard, "to look like any of the movie-star faces I wanted him to look like. So finally I decided, 'I'm just going to let it look like whoever it ends up looking like.' Well, I have a friend who lives in this area whose son was kidnapped and taken to Lebanon. She swears that I have unknowingly painted her son. I've since seen a photograph and it does look like him -- same hair and facial structure. Around Christmas, she was coming here every day and sitting here soothing herself. She took it completely seriously."

Five blocks east, at the corner of Adams and 35th, stands the Corner Wash Laundromat. To the left of the Laundromat is a small parking lot, and on the left of the lot stands a brick wall that's been painted white. In the center of that wall is Van Weelden's second mural, a dark-skinned woman in a royal-blue dress speckled with stars. She's bending over a garment she is laundering by hand. Her long black hair hangs down over her shoulders. She has deep-set, dark eyes, high cheekbones, and full lips. "There was a huge [graffiti] tag on this wall," Van Weelden says. "If you look closely, you can see where the outline of the large letters is. I came out here one day and asked the Laundromat owners if they minded if I did a mural. They said go right ahead, so I pulled out some paint and started working on it. I didn't have any preconceived notions of what I wanted to do. I just came out here with my paints and brushes. I got a rough concept of a woman washing something because of the Laundromat, but I didn't have any sketches. I enjoyed doing this. I like the kind of art I do when it's just from the moment."

Van Weelden, who teaches art and says she's not just a muralist but works in "all of the mediums," did the Laundromat mural gratis. Her fee for the Park Place Screen & Glass mural was $1800, not all of which she's collected. It took over a month for her to paint the mural. She says it would be a "long shot and a very slow shot" to make a living doing only murals. "There is a business side to this," she says, "that some people may have a talent for. I'm not the sharpest business person, frankly. I think more in creative than analytical terms. I've found that, for most people, you can either be a good business person or a good artist. It's hard to be both."

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