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— Price said he spent most of his legal career in Houston. He said he worked from 1974 to 1984 as the general counsel for K-Mart/Clarke Development Real Estate. In that position, he said he helped build the K-Mart on Clairemont Mesa Boulevard. He also developed computer software that lawyers can use for recording their hours and billing clients. Disillusionment with the legal profession and a marriage gone awry prompted him to quit and return to San Diego, Price said. He grew up in Fallbrook, he said, where he graduated from high school in the mid-1960s.

To hear them talk about the adult-Internet industry and the unwanted publicity from the Associated Press -- and Price does most of the talking -- Price and Winslow come across as babes in the virtual woods or virtual babes in the woods.

Although the Sexyreds website has been posted for several months, video sales have been disappointing, Price said. Movie titles range from tame, Amanda's Diary, to raunchy, Juan's Hot Latin Pussy Adventures 2. So far, the site lacks any of the banners, promotions, and joint ventures that would bring in advertising revenue. Few websites can make significant money selling products, according to Miller and SexTracker.

At times, Price seems enthusiastic about touting the business. "I don't really care what you say about me, just spell my website right." Yet he seems to have missed a golden opportunity for promoting Sexyreds at the ia2000 show during his interview with the Associated Press.

Price said he thought Wagner was conducting a marketing survey for the Associated Press. Winslow said she had no idea that Wagner was writing a news story that would be accessible to newspapers nationwide and internationally. She said she was incensed to learn about the article from her daughter. "When I get mad, I say things very calmly," Winslow said. She acknowledged she was not really tuned into Wagner or what the reporter was doing. Consequently, Winslow said, she let Price do most of the talking.

"I didn't say I was doing a marketing survey. I said, 'I'm with the Associated Press and I'm doing a story on the show.' They definitely knew they were talking to a reporter. They probably didn't realize what would happen," Wagner said. "I probably talked to them for maybe ten minutes. She was really reserved. He definitely did most of the talking."

Price, who still contends he was responding to a market study, recalls he made statements to shock Wagner. "I started pulling her leg a little bit. I said things like 'Sex sells.' I told her a lot of stuff. Half of it was true. Half of it wasn't." The part that was true were Price's and Winslow's names, spelled correctly; their ages; their former occupations; and their place of residence: San Diego. Many people in the adult-Internet business use stage names or aliases to obscure their true identity.

One of Price's video suppliers, who would speak only on the condition of anonymity, said most people with ties to pornography dread exposure. The supplier, who owns a video shop in San Diego, said he fears ostracism by neighbors and friends if they were to learn his inventory included X-rated videos or that he supplied an X-rated website. "They might think I'm a pervert. It would ruin my life." But, he said, the economic reality is, he can make substantially more money from selling and renting pornographic videos than from mainstream movies. "Jean doesn't sound happy about this story."

Price stressed that Winslow's involvement in Internet pornography is peripheral, and Winslow said she is disconnecting from Sexyreds completely. Instead, she said she would supplement her retirement income the way she has in the past: via the computer trading of stocks, mostly technology stocks. Price said he is uncertain about the future of Sexyreds; he may consider selling the website. "The people who really make money in this business are the ones who provide the content, the web hosting, the merchant accounts, the management services," he concluded.

Winslow said she has lost sleep over the Associated Press story because she is worried about the reaction of friends. She said she hasn't spoken to anyone about the news report except her children. "It was such a simple encounter. It was such a simple situation, for it to have such far-reaching implications," Winslow said. "I'm from a rather conservative family. I probably could lose friends. I don't know."

Price chimed in suggesting, "Then those friends aren't worth having." Winslow said, "You're probably right."

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