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— In a country where the word "Christian" is often modified by the word "fundamentalist," Hartley's refusal to reconcile his actions with some dogma, dirty or otherwise, is unusual.

But life's a funny thing. That's something Hartley learned with Saviour Machine. Since 1993, when he graduated from UCSD's Warren College, Hartley has been the drummer for the band, which doesn't rate a mention in The New Rolling Stone Encyclopedia of Rock & Roll or The Trouser Press Guide to '90s Rock, but has a sizable following in Europe, especially Germany and Belgium. The group's videos have been featured on WEWA, a sort of German VH-1, as well as the European MTV, and Hartley and his Saviour Machine pals toured Europe nine times over the past few years, taking advantage of Hartley's summer breaks from his law studies at Tulane. "In Europe we play all big places," Hartley says, "nothing smaller than the [Los Angeles] Palladium..."

But the success had a twist: Most of the band's European fans had no clue that Saviour Machine was a Christian band. Why would they? In Germany, Saviour Machine was distributed by Massacre Records, a label best known for bands like Atrocity, Whiplash, and PainFlow. "[Massacre] could even be considered the exact opposite of a Christian label," Hartley laughs. "They've got some really, like, satanic acts on there.

"When I first went over there I was surprised because we'd just done a U.S. tour and almost everybody who came to see us in the U.S. was Christian. It was marketed through Christian record stores and things like that," Hartley says. "But in Germany, it was a completely secular crowd. They just dug the music. The girls would come up to us after the show and be, like, 'Sign my body. Touch my body.'

"The people who find the lyrics valuable to them spiritually, more power to them. But I was surprised to find out there weren't that many."

But even before the Buck Narrows project drove a wedge between the band members, Hartley had tired of performing and was looking to get into the business side of the entertainment business. Touring, he says, was anything but a holiday, even if there were young women waiting after each European show who needed to brush up on the Ten Commandments.

"Let me tell you, [touring] is the furthest thing from a vacation," Hartley says.

"A vacation is when you have your own itinerary, you can do whatever the hell you want to do at your leisure. When I'm over there, I'm a slave. You get in there, and you rent a bus with sleeping arrangements because you really don't make money if you have to pay for a hotel room in every city. So you have this big tour bus and you load all the gear. You drive to the venue. The first day's fine because you're starting out at a normal hour. You get to the venue early afternoon, you set up all of your gear. It takes a few hours. Then you do the sound check. That takes another three or four hours because you have to sound check along with the other bands you're playing with. Then you go back to your bus and have dinner, which is usually provided by the venue. On a good night, it's lukewarm spaghetti. On a bad night, it's a piece of salami on toast. The only good thing is you get all the beer you can drink, and it's always good. German beer. You just can't beat it.

"Then you do your show. Then you have to de-set. So then you get on the road at three or four in the morning. Then you drive all friggin' day and sleep while the sun's up to get to the next venue, which often wouldn't be the logical place, which is the next city, it would be 500 miles away or something. You drive all day and night. There's no time to stop. You don't see any of the countryside because you're sleeping during the day. When you do wake up during the day and you're on the bus for the last two hours of the trip, all you can see is the friggin' freeway.

"The only thing that's glamorous is I come away with some money, and I can brag about it to friends who think it sounds glamorous. But this is the truth of the matter as any band that's done it will tell you. It's no vacation."

With the road and the groupies behind him and Saviour Machine (almost) a memory, Hartley is concentrating his energies on Dirty Dogma and its artists, including Narrows, Basement, Strychnine Kiss, and Acid Flowers.

"My next step is to get the records for sale in local record stores," Hartley says. "I've already talked to Tower Records about being recognized as a legitimate distributor. You have to have several different artists on your label, and then they'll start carrying you. So I'm talking with them. In the meantime, I'm soliciting deals with record companies to try to get it out and maybe even possibly have them buy an artist out or something."

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