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AB: Yeah, or borrow money from people.

MP: How do you sell them?

AB: What I did at that point was just get a magazine and sold the entire video as one piece to different distributors. After about six months I decided to start my own distribution. I basically met a salesperson and got his list of all the stores and all the other distributors. Out of my garage, found a duplicator and a printer and printed the boxes, duplicated the tape, and sold the pieces to each distributor out of a "warehouse." I'd pack them at night, and in the morning the UPS guy would come at 10:00. I'd let him in my garage and give him all the boxes. During the afternoon I would try to get together the funds to make another movie or sell more pieces. I went from that to about a year and a half, maybe two years ago, I was probably at the high point of my career. We had about 25 employees and manufacturing facilities and so on.

MP: What happened since then?

AB: About two years ago I got charged in a lawsuit, a copyright-infringement lawsuit. I stopped working for maybe eight or nine months. I was in limbo and moved to L.A.; I had just moved to L.A. when the lawsuit happened. I sold my company at that point -- all the assets, all the videos, all the boxes and everything -- and just continued producing and directing movies for whatever company would want a product from me.

MP: So all the stuff that you'd done, at that point you decided you'd better sell and liquidate?

AB: Right.

MP: What kind of infringement was it?

AB: They're saying it's a copyright infringement, a trademark infringement, dilution, stuff like that.

MP: Were you using somebody's name?

AB: It was Oreo -- O-R-E-O. I made a movie called Whoreo. They're saying between the name and the pattern of how we designed the box cover, I guess they're saying it's similar to the cookie packaging.

MP: So they sued you?

AB: Yep.

MP: What happened?

AB: It's actually ongoing. It's been almost three years now. The judge keeps postponing the case. He's postponed it two years now. We were supposed to have [a hearing] in May 1997, May 1998; now they've pushed it back to September 1998.

MP: Who makes Oreos?

AB: Nabisco.

MP: Nabisco. So they're suing you?

AB: Yeah. RJR, the tobacco company.

MP: You don't smoke, I guess?

AB: No, I'm a diabetic. Don't even eat the cookies.

MP: So, in response to the lawsuit, you sold the company?

AB: Yeah, I was going to need the money. Legal expenses are outrageous. Combined I think we're over $100,000. On two videos, we made $3000 or $4000 or something.

MP: Can you tell me what you were grossing back then, before you sold out?

AB: That part I don't know. I know I have a pretty comfortable lifestyle, but you know there are accountants and so forth, and I don't handle any of that stuff. Especially nowadays I don't. We have in-house counsel, attorneys, and cpas. Nowadays, my duties have been less, and I'm basically producer and director.

MP: In other words, this is the same company you had and then you sold it. Now you're working for it?

AB: Yes, I sold the company to some investors out of Ireland, and they agreed to employ me.

MP: Irish investors?

AB: Yeah, their company's based in Ireland.

MP: What's it called?

AB: The Irish corporation? It's called "10471."

MP: That's the name of the corporation? Before you sold it, what were you grossing? Do you know that?

AB: No, but more than most people. Especially more than most people my age.

MP: Is the company now growing back to what it had been before the lawsuit?

AB: Yeah, I mean the problem is so many companies have started coming out now that the market's flooded. When I came into the business there were about 2200 movies put out that year. I think last year there were almost 9000 movies put out, about 185 movies a week put out.

MP: No kidding? Since it's so cheap to do?

AB: It's cheap and everyone thinks they can do it. The people who are getting the last laughs, though, are the video stores and the distributors who are buying the tapes from these manufacturers. The manufacturers go out of business, they don't have to pay anybody. You know, if you're not big enough in this industry, you just can't collect your money that you need to collect from different distributors.

MP: Are you nine-to-five now, or do you put in long hours?

AB: I probably work four days a month, and they're usually up in L.A., and they're long hours, probably 18 to 20 hours. That's the actual production shooting. All I do now is produce and direct. I mean, if somebody has a question or something, I can help them out, but I don't pay the bills or any of that stuff anymore.

MP: What kind of movies do you make now?

AB: Now we do two lesbian, one boy/girl, and a gang bang.

MP: In one picture?

AB: No, there's four different shows.

MP: And so, like a typical day, you would go up there and you'd do all three in a day?

AB: No, I do four in four days. It takes me one day to shoot each one.

MP: Do you do it on a set or in a house?

AB: Usually on location. They call them one-day wonders.

MP: Is that the average for the business now?

AB: Some movies may take three or four days, if they shoot them on film or whatever, if they have a lot of dialogue. My movies have no dialogue; mine are action.

MP: Do you arrange for all the casting and stuff, or do you just show up and direct?

AB: Sometimes I'll put my input in, but we have production managers that do all that, pick the girls, and the girls know who they want to work with, who the guys want to work with, and what the rate is. I pretty much give a budget to my production manager. He knows my style; he knows what kind of girls I want, what kind of guys I want, so he'll handle all that.

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