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Worker payroll deductions fuel Qualcomm's corporate PAC

While the battle rages on over the merits of California's Proposition 32, the so-called paycheck protection measure backed by La Jolla financier R.G. "Buzz" Woolley and other wealthy locals, one of the county's biggest and most powerful corporations is using biweekly payroll deductions to collect employee contributions for its federal political action committee, according to a disclosure statement posted online by the Federal Election Commission.

The Qualcomm Incorporated Political Action Committee, QPAC for short, raised $139,206 from the beginning of this year through the end of August, according to the September 19 filing. The PAC spent $78,030.

In addition to such big company wheels as president Steve Altman, who kicked in $3,269 via a "biweekly payroll deduction" of $192.30, employee donors included senior counsel David Arnold, who gave $340 in $20 withholding increments; information technology vice president Brian Baker, with $2288, at a biweekly rate of $134.62; and government affairs senior vice president William Bold, who came up with $1634 at $96.15 every other week.

Engineer Robert Isley gave $326 at the rate of $19.23 every other week; technology V.P. Ahmad Jalali contributed $980 at a $57.69 biweekly rate; and engineering chief Farrokh Khatibi gave $680 in $40 withholding increments.

According to the website OpenSecrets.org, this year the Qualcomm PAC has given 55 percent of its cash to Democrats and 46 percent to Republicans.

Top California recipients include GOP Rep. Mary Bono of Palm Springs ($5,000); North County Republican congressman Darrell Issa ($3,500); and Democratic congresswoman and ex-House Speaker Nancy Pelosi ($3,500).

QPAC'S top two beneficiaries are both Republican, according to the OpenSecrets database: Oregon congressman Greg Walden, who got $6,500, and Utah conservative Sen. Orrin G. Hatch, who received $6,000.

Hatch, at 78, would be the Senate's most senior Republican if, as widely expected, he is re-elected in November.

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While the battle rages on over the merits of California's Proposition 32, the so-called paycheck protection measure backed by La Jolla financier R.G. "Buzz" Woolley and other wealthy locals, one of the county's biggest and most powerful corporations is using biweekly payroll deductions to collect employee contributions for its federal political action committee, according to a disclosure statement posted online by the Federal Election Commission.

The Qualcomm Incorporated Political Action Committee, QPAC for short, raised $139,206 from the beginning of this year through the end of August, according to the September 19 filing. The PAC spent $78,030.

In addition to such big company wheels as president Steve Altman, who kicked in $3,269 via a "biweekly payroll deduction" of $192.30, employee donors included senior counsel David Arnold, who gave $340 in $20 withholding increments; information technology vice president Brian Baker, with $2288, at a biweekly rate of $134.62; and government affairs senior vice president William Bold, who came up with $1634 at $96.15 every other week.

Engineer Robert Isley gave $326 at the rate of $19.23 every other week; technology V.P. Ahmad Jalali contributed $980 at a $57.69 biweekly rate; and engineering chief Farrokh Khatibi gave $680 in $40 withholding increments.

According to the website OpenSecrets.org, this year the Qualcomm PAC has given 55 percent of its cash to Democrats and 46 percent to Republicans.

Top California recipients include GOP Rep. Mary Bono of Palm Springs ($5,000); North County Republican congressman Darrell Issa ($3,500); and Democratic congresswoman and ex-House Speaker Nancy Pelosi ($3,500).

QPAC'S top two beneficiaries are both Republican, according to the OpenSecrets database: Oregon congressman Greg Walden, who got $6,500, and Utah conservative Sen. Orrin G. Hatch, who received $6,000.

Hatch, at 78, would be the Senate's most senior Republican if, as widely expected, he is re-elected in November.

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Comments
3

The issue isn't "paycheck deductions". The issue is, are they voluntary or not? In the case of Qualcomm, it appears that they are, and prop 32 won't affect them. The public employee union shills will contend that their paycheck deductions are voluntary, too... in which case Prop 32 won't affect them, either, and one has to wonder why, exactly, they oppose Prop 32 so stridently.

Yes on 32, NO on 30 & 38

Sept. 25, 2012

Dude, your photo of that yellow-eyed dog chewing on a stuffed toy tells us that you are one tough customer. However, since you seem to be mystified about Prop 32, here are some comments from leading newspapers around the state:

"...a fraud to end all frauds" - LA Times

“…dripping with cynicism” – Sacramento Bee

“…a phony veneer of fairness…one-sided and biased” – Long Beach Press Telegram

"...would magnify the influence of wealthy interests while shutting out many middle-class voters" - San Jose Mercury News

"...a deceptive sham...would make a bad system worse" - Contra Costa Times

and again from Los Angeles:

“…would just expand unaccountable independent expenditure committees, the super-PACs” – LA Times

Incidentally, the primary financial backers appear to be retired CEOs and millionaires associated with the completely right-wing Lincoln Club of Orange County.

You're either working for the Man (see also Troll) or a misinformed participant in this discussion (see also Idiot). Either way, it's immaterial, as Prop 32 will go down in flames in November, just like Prop 23 did two years ago.

Adios, muchacho.

Sept. 25, 2012

How can anyone in good conscience plan to vote anything but YES on 38 that sends money directly to support K-12 public education, requires local community input on spending decisions, is backed by the California PTA and includes a sunset clause? Please, vote YES on 38!

Sept. 25, 2012

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