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State Prisons Appear to Fall Short on Overcrowding Reduction Order

Today is the first benchmark date for the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation to reduce prison overcrowding as per a U.S. Supreme Court ruling. CDCR has until January 10 to prepare and provide a report on the progress of inmate population reduction for review by a three-judge court which initially issued the order.

Inmate populations in California’s 33 state-detention facilities should be reduced to 167 percent of the capacity they were designed to hold by December 27. The number should drop to 155 percent by June 27, 2012, to 147 percent one year from now, and to 137.5 percent of capacity by June 2013.

Prisons are designed for use by one prisoner per cell, and call for single level beds to be used in dormitory-type settings. Using these guidelines, California can currently house 79,858 inmates.

As of December 14, 134,804 people were in custody, representing 169.2 percent of the system’s capacity. Locally, the Richard J. Donovan Correctional Facility near the southern border has a reported population of 3,941, representing 179% of the prison’s 2,200 inmate capacity as of December 21. To San Diego’s east, the Imperial Valley facilities Centinela and Calipatria were overpopulated by ratios of 168.5 percent and 188 percent, respectively.

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Today is the first benchmark date for the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation to reduce prison overcrowding as per a U.S. Supreme Court ruling. CDCR has until January 10 to prepare and provide a report on the progress of inmate population reduction for review by a three-judge court which initially issued the order.

Inmate populations in California’s 33 state-detention facilities should be reduced to 167 percent of the capacity they were designed to hold by December 27. The number should drop to 155 percent by June 27, 2012, to 147 percent one year from now, and to 137.5 percent of capacity by June 2013.

Prisons are designed for use by one prisoner per cell, and call for single level beds to be used in dormitory-type settings. Using these guidelines, California can currently house 79,858 inmates.

As of December 14, 134,804 people were in custody, representing 169.2 percent of the system’s capacity. Locally, the Richard J. Donovan Correctional Facility near the southern border has a reported population of 3,941, representing 179% of the prison’s 2,200 inmate capacity as of December 21. To San Diego’s east, the Imperial Valley facilities Centinela and Calipatria were overpopulated by ratios of 168.5 percent and 188 percent, respectively.

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Comments
7

Those % are pathetic.

There is NO reason for prisons to be at 170%-190% of capacity. Thank the PUBLIC prison guards union for wrecking the system, so they can line their pockets-which in turn lines politicians pockets.

Our state and country are disentigrating right before our eyes......

Dec. 27, 2011

"Our state and country are disentigrating right before our eyes......"

And they are also disintegrating. ;-)

Dec. 27, 2011

Thanks dwbat, I knew I should have checked that-I use IE9, no built in spell check-

Dec. 27, 2011

Each prisoner upon sentencing should receive a numerical score based on the severity of the crime, prior criminal history, etc. The numbers of prisoners incarcerated should be capped at a reasonable number in order to limit the burden on the taxpayer. If the total prison population goes over the cap, say 65,000 prisoners at anyone time, those prisoners with the highest point total should be summarily executed in order to bring the number below the 65,000 cap.

Dec. 27, 2011

4.Each prisoner upon sentencing should receive a numerical score based on the severity of the crime, prior criminal history, etc

This is exactly what the federal system does with the "sentencing guyiidelines", it rates the crime, the history of the accused and a other factors, the problem is the probation department which issues the scores can deviate from them on any number of reasons which allows the scoring system to be completely gamed and manipulated. So it just doesn't work.

The fact is we have penalties that are FAR too harsh for minor offenses. Especially when the accused has priors. That is where you get dork DA's charging a third strike with a 25-life term over stealing a slice of pizza or steal a few videos from K-mart.......... granted these people were career criminals but do we REALLY want to lock them up at a cost of over $50 per YEAR??? Sorry, not me. The cost is too high for the minor offenses.....

IMO non violent crimes should never be charged as a strike-either 2nd or 3rd strikes-under the 3 strikes law.

I have no problem with 3 strikes for VIOLENT and dangerous people, but that is where it should end IMO.

Dec. 27, 2011

The fact is we have penalties that are FAR too harsh for minor offenses. Especially when the accused has priors. That is where you get dork DA's charging a third strike with a 25-life term over stealing a slice of pizza or steal a few videos from K-mart.......... granted these people were career criminals but do we REALLY want to lock them up at a cost of over $50 per YEAR??? Sorry, not me. The cost is too high for the minor offenses.....

==========

What the studies shows is that the average three striker gets away with 200 or more indvidual crimes before being caught. It's not the fact that the three striker stole videos from K-Mart. The reality is that the average three strikers will have committed over 200 crimes before being caught stealing videos at K-Mart. That is why a three striker should be sentenced to life in prison for stealing videos or pizza.

Dec. 28, 2011

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