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Leonard Patton & Geoffrey Keezer's Expressions

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Expressions represents a sublime collaboration between two of San Diego's best kept secrets: vocalist Leonard Patton, and pianist Geoffrey Keezer.

Patton's regular gigs include teaching and performing musical theater, he's been featured in the Lamb's Players production of miXtape, for several years, and he works with guitarist Peter Sprague in group and duo settings.

Keezer was an international recording and touring star long before love brought him to San Diego--he came to marry the remarkable San Diego Symphony bassist Susan Wulff. The pianist does most of his work out of town, which is a shame, because he's a major voice who never fails to surprise.

Stevie Wonder's glorious gospel piece "Love's In Need Of Love Today" opens the disc. Patton's got a similar range, but his burnished tenor is slightly deeper and huskier. Keezer's accompaniment is sensitive and crystal clear, with perfectly placed articulations that propel the inherent groove without being a slave to it.

Unlike so many of today's singers, Patton doesn't fall into the trap of showoff virtuosity and ridiculous ornamentation. He's got chops for sure, but he's also got taste, and one of those god-awful "auto-tune" devices would just sit in the corner, bored to death at one of his sessions.

"Everybody Wants To Rule The World," is next, with Keezer alluding to, rather than reproducing the classic vibraphone vamp intro. Patton's vocal is naked and unadorned, and much less fey than the original Tears For Fears version.

Alec Wilder's "Blackberry Winter" is the closest thing to a traditional piano/vocal performance here--and it that vein, it delivers. Patton cradles the melody with grace and gravitas, and Keezer responds with a joyfully expressive solo that laces intricate filigree through the harmonic landscape. I first heard Keith Jarrett play this tune many years ago--that memory came rushing back to me as I experienced their version--quite a compliment, in my book.

Patton and Keezer have a run at Thelonious Monk's "Think Of One," and it's one of those freewheeling moments that make this disc essential. The two musicians improvise on the theme as equal partners, and it's hard not to think of Bobby McFerrin, particularly his collaborations with Chick Corea, on their landmark 1992 Blue Note release, Play.

Keezer and Patton tease the melody out in a push/pull dynamic, changing on a dime from terse staccato's to elongations on the time. The pianist inserts passages of almost barrelhouse walking bass, over which the vocals soar and swoop like a bird of prey.

The music of iconoclast Ornette Coleman has left an indelible imprint on Patton and his original, "Go Fish" bears that out. There is a sense of daring-do happening, and a playfulness that reflects the organic nature of Coleman's oeuvre--and, as tenor saxophonist Archie Shepp once predicted, "Ornette's music becomes more important as each year passes." One can only hope that Coleman's influence will become more commonplace. "Go Fish" is a welcome turn in that direction.

Another Patton original, "Morning Sun," begins with rolling arpeggios and tastefully overdubbed electric piano bell-tones, yielding to an astonishing Keezer solo on both instruments. "Morning Sun" has all of the lyrical optimism its title implies, and Patton's soulful delivery conveys a sense of yearning that digs beneath the cheery sentiment for a more complete emotional statement.

The finale, a free rumination on the showtune, "Softly As In A Morning Sunrise," begins as a ballad with Patton's honey-toned, laid back essay settting up a second chorus in a furious double-time. From there on out--it's strictly music of the moment, as Keezer responds, supports, opposes and invents around the stream-of-consciousness scatting. It's cinematic, even kaleidoscopic in nature--and worth the price of this disc on its own.

One final note: the album was engineered, and co-produced (with Patton) by Peter Sprague at Spragueland Studios, and it must be mentioned that the sound on this disc is superb. Keezer's piano and Patton's voice are beautifully reproduced and every gesture captured in high fidelity.

Cover Art by Ruthie Marchand

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See what happens when you’re a sarcastic jackass with God?

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Expressions represents a sublime collaboration between two of San Diego's best kept secrets: vocalist Leonard Patton, and pianist Geoffrey Keezer.

Patton's regular gigs include teaching and performing musical theater, he's been featured in the Lamb's Players production of miXtape, for several years, and he works with guitarist Peter Sprague in group and duo settings.

Keezer was an international recording and touring star long before love brought him to San Diego--he came to marry the remarkable San Diego Symphony bassist Susan Wulff. The pianist does most of his work out of town, which is a shame, because he's a major voice who never fails to surprise.

Stevie Wonder's glorious gospel piece "Love's In Need Of Love Today" opens the disc. Patton's got a similar range, but his burnished tenor is slightly deeper and huskier. Keezer's accompaniment is sensitive and crystal clear, with perfectly placed articulations that propel the inherent groove without being a slave to it.

Unlike so many of today's singers, Patton doesn't fall into the trap of showoff virtuosity and ridiculous ornamentation. He's got chops for sure, but he's also got taste, and one of those god-awful "auto-tune" devices would just sit in the corner, bored to death at one of his sessions.

"Everybody Wants To Rule The World," is next, with Keezer alluding to, rather than reproducing the classic vibraphone vamp intro. Patton's vocal is naked and unadorned, and much less fey than the original Tears For Fears version.

Alec Wilder's "Blackberry Winter" is the closest thing to a traditional piano/vocal performance here--and it that vein, it delivers. Patton cradles the melody with grace and gravitas, and Keezer responds with a joyfully expressive solo that laces intricate filigree through the harmonic landscape. I first heard Keith Jarrett play this tune many years ago--that memory came rushing back to me as I experienced their version--quite a compliment, in my book.

Patton and Keezer have a run at Thelonious Monk's "Think Of One," and it's one of those freewheeling moments that make this disc essential. The two musicians improvise on the theme as equal partners, and it's hard not to think of Bobby McFerrin, particularly his collaborations with Chick Corea, on their landmark 1992 Blue Note release, Play.

Keezer and Patton tease the melody out in a push/pull dynamic, changing on a dime from terse staccato's to elongations on the time. The pianist inserts passages of almost barrelhouse walking bass, over which the vocals soar and swoop like a bird of prey.

The music of iconoclast Ornette Coleman has left an indelible imprint on Patton and his original, "Go Fish" bears that out. There is a sense of daring-do happening, and a playfulness that reflects the organic nature of Coleman's oeuvre--and, as tenor saxophonist Archie Shepp once predicted, "Ornette's music becomes more important as each year passes." One can only hope that Coleman's influence will become more commonplace. "Go Fish" is a welcome turn in that direction.

Another Patton original, "Morning Sun," begins with rolling arpeggios and tastefully overdubbed electric piano bell-tones, yielding to an astonishing Keezer solo on both instruments. "Morning Sun" has all of the lyrical optimism its title implies, and Patton's soulful delivery conveys a sense of yearning that digs beneath the cheery sentiment for a more complete emotional statement.

The finale, a free rumination on the showtune, "Softly As In A Morning Sunrise," begins as a ballad with Patton's honey-toned, laid back essay settting up a second chorus in a furious double-time. From there on out--it's strictly music of the moment, as Keezer responds, supports, opposes and invents around the stream-of-consciousness scatting. It's cinematic, even kaleidoscopic in nature--and worth the price of this disc on its own.

One final note: the album was engineered, and co-produced (with Patton) by Peter Sprague at Spragueland Studios, and it must be mentioned that the sound on this disc is superb. Keezer's piano and Patton's voice are beautifully reproduced and every gesture captured in high fidelity.

Cover Art by Ruthie Marchand

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4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
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