Quantcast
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Could Burning Man come to In-Ko-Pah?

Desert View Tower on market for $2.25 million

in 1927, real estate developer Bert Vaughn financed construction of the tower to put Jacumba on the map. - Image by Deja Correia
in 1927, real estate developer Bert Vaughn financed construction of the tower to put Jacumba on the map.

Roadside attraction Desert View Tower at In-Ko-Pah is on the market. Rising over the steep, rocky Jacumba landscape, the 70-foot tower has been a beacon to travelers since 1928. Ben Schultz now owns and operates it with his family. As many curious road-trippers know, visitors can climb the spiral staircase to the top, peruse the gift shop and romp in caves among carved rock characters that populate Boulder Park. Assets include 90 acres, two historical markers, three homes and a Balinese yoga platform. The Schultzes live on site. One of their homes is built into the rocks.

Three small homes come with the 90-acre Desert View Tower property.

“I have loved this place since I was four, and when I realized I could swing it — I jumped for it. Wouldn’t anybody?” said the owner about why he decided to move his family from Santa Cruz to buy the property in 2002. But “we’re getting older,” Schultz said.

“The right buyers would optimally keep it open to the public,” said Lanz Correia, listing agent. “They have visitor logs that go back to the fifties.”

Visitors include a Chinese female weight lifting team and families of Hasidic Jews. On the same day.

Skull Boulder. Maintenance of Boulder Park might involve paint touch-up on the original 1930s sculptures.

“I must say it is a gratifying thing every day to get to share this place with people who love it,” said Schultz. “I mostly try to maintain things as I found them as an honor to those who have come before. There are so many issues of signage and curation that I am not competent to deal with, that I just try to keep what I see as the original site.”

Before Interstate 8 was completed in the 1960s, Highway 80 snaked along the steep grade right past the tower — a rest stop where automobile enthusiasts and truckers could fill overheated radiators. Concurrent with the old highway’s paving in 1927, real estate developer Bert Vaughn financed construction of the tower to put Jacumba on the map. The pass was already a known stop on the wagon route, where a pair of entrepreneurs built a small store to sell supplies to travelers in 1863. The first automobiles came over In-Ko-Pah Summit in 1913.

Vortex of Good Vibes

Investment in Desert View Tower includes adjacent Boulder Park. As the story goes, out-of-work engineer Merle Ratcliff carved the giant stone sculptures into the existing landscape in the 1930s during the Depression — adding to the attraction, especially for kids. Approximate annual income from admission fees to the park and tower is $120,000.

Correia pointed out an area covered with natural vegetation. “Most people don’t know there’s a pretty little valley over here. The owners say they can hear bighorn sheep fighting.”

“It’s great for watching meteor showers, and there’s camping — with bathrooms.”

Lookers thus far include a large family with many kids who would live on the property and a holistic group interested in the potential to hold gatherings and events. EDM (Burning Man) and other festival organizers have shown interest. Correia said there’s plenty of room to develop more parking and other concepts.

The only neighbor is Coyote’s Flying Saucer Retrieval and Repair Shop. Asking price $2.25 million.

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

More palm greasers’ help wanted

Tom Sudberry, Peter Cooper give to Barbara Bry
in 1927, real estate developer Bert Vaughn financed construction of the tower to put Jacumba on the map. - Image by Deja Correia
in 1927, real estate developer Bert Vaughn financed construction of the tower to put Jacumba on the map.

Roadside attraction Desert View Tower at In-Ko-Pah is on the market. Rising over the steep, rocky Jacumba landscape, the 70-foot tower has been a beacon to travelers since 1928. Ben Schultz now owns and operates it with his family. As many curious road-trippers know, visitors can climb the spiral staircase to the top, peruse the gift shop and romp in caves among carved rock characters that populate Boulder Park. Assets include 90 acres, two historical markers, three homes and a Balinese yoga platform. The Schultzes live on site. One of their homes is built into the rocks.

Three small homes come with the 90-acre Desert View Tower property.

“I have loved this place since I was four, and when I realized I could swing it — I jumped for it. Wouldn’t anybody?” said the owner about why he decided to move his family from Santa Cruz to buy the property in 2002. But “we’re getting older,” Schultz said.

“The right buyers would optimally keep it open to the public,” said Lanz Correia, listing agent. “They have visitor logs that go back to the fifties.”

Visitors include a Chinese female weight lifting team and families of Hasidic Jews. On the same day.

Skull Boulder. Maintenance of Boulder Park might involve paint touch-up on the original 1930s sculptures.

“I must say it is a gratifying thing every day to get to share this place with people who love it,” said Schultz. “I mostly try to maintain things as I found them as an honor to those who have come before. There are so many issues of signage and curation that I am not competent to deal with, that I just try to keep what I see as the original site.”

Before Interstate 8 was completed in the 1960s, Highway 80 snaked along the steep grade right past the tower — a rest stop where automobile enthusiasts and truckers could fill overheated radiators. Concurrent with the old highway’s paving in 1927, real estate developer Bert Vaughn financed construction of the tower to put Jacumba on the map. The pass was already a known stop on the wagon route, where a pair of entrepreneurs built a small store to sell supplies to travelers in 1863. The first automobiles came over In-Ko-Pah Summit in 1913.

Vortex of Good Vibes

Investment in Desert View Tower includes adjacent Boulder Park. As the story goes, out-of-work engineer Merle Ratcliff carved the giant stone sculptures into the existing landscape in the 1930s during the Depression — adding to the attraction, especially for kids. Approximate annual income from admission fees to the park and tower is $120,000.

Correia pointed out an area covered with natural vegetation. “Most people don’t know there’s a pretty little valley over here. The owners say they can hear bighorn sheep fighting.”

“It’s great for watching meteor showers, and there’s camping — with bathrooms.”

Lookers thus far include a large family with many kids who would live on the property and a holistic group interested in the potential to hold gatherings and events. EDM (Burning Man) and other festival organizers have shown interest. Correia said there’s plenty of room to develop more parking and other concepts.

The only neighbor is Coyote’s Flying Saucer Retrieval and Repair Shop. Asking price $2.25 million.

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Poppin’ Padres petition for permanent props in stands

The Crowd Goes Mild!
Next Article

Song Without a Name: gone baby gone

Melina León finds horror in an environment usually associated with safety and nurturing.
Comments
6

Wow! The asking price went up by $1 million. There was a SDUT story in November 2017 about the tower and property for sale at $1.25 million. I guess when things don't sell, double the price.

Aug. 27, 2019

It would make more sense to lower the price if something isn't selling, but what the heck do I know. Has the "value" increased that much?

Aug. 27, 2019

Burning Man, as it now is conducted, requires an immense flat desert and a huge amount of parking for all the attendees. Someone with an attachment to BM might, and I stress "might" find some way to use that property for something like Burning Man. But whatever it would be would not be a blow-off on the scale of Burning Man. Yeah right, "there’s plenty of room to develop more parking". I don' theenk zo, Senor. A few dozen more spaces to park cars, trucks and RV's won't make it a place for a gigantic coming-together such as Burning Man. No, any ambition for the place needs to be far more modest, and innovative.

Let's get real here, Leorah.

Aug. 27, 2019
This comment was removed by the site staff for violation of the usage agreement.
Aug. 29, 2019

Hi Visduh,

Thanks for your comment. I did not write that headline, the editor added it after I submitted the story. Thanks for reading.

Regards,

Leorah

Aug. 28, 2019
This comment was removed by the site staff for violation of the usage agreement.
Sept. 2, 2019

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer News — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close