4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Be first in line for Chris Mann, Third Eye Blind, and Shovels & Rope

And do you like L.A. Witch or Converge?

Chris Mann at Martinis Above Fourth on November 9
Chris Mann at Martinis Above Fourth on November 9

Hillcrest’s Martinis Above Fourth has been mining a rich vein of TV-music-competition vets, often selling out the house, thanks to instantly famous faces who arrive with a built-in boob-tube fan base. In 2012, singer Chris Mann wowed the judges on the second season of The Voice, where the Wichita native managed to pull off everything from Andrea Bocelli to Coldplay, Simon & Garfunkel, and the Verve. He eventually came in fourth place, quickly moving on to a Christmas EP (a Walmart exclusive), followed a few weeks later by his debut studio full-length, Roads. Aided by the TV exposure and a major label push via Universal Republic, that album topped the U.S. Heatseakers chart, as well as hitting number five on the U.S. Classical chart. Before the year was out, he even had his own PBS special, A Mann For All Seasons. He’s gone on to singing for several movie soundtracks and touring with India.Arie and Indina Menzel, with a sophomore album, Constellation, released last year. That one wasn’t on a major label and pretty much sank with little notice, but he’s managed to console himself by becoming one of the most acclaimed vocalists to portray the title character in U.S. touring versions of The Phantom of the Opera, a role he’s taken on for over 700 performances. When he hits the stage at Martinis Above Fourth on November 9, expect to hear his new single, “I Wanna (One Dance) with Somebody,” a novelty mashup of Drake and Whitney Houston that has already earned the classically trained crooner a coveted slot on Dr. Demento’s Funny 25 list.

L.A. Witch, just riotous West Coast girls

The world may not have asked for an alt-country goth-pop band, but female trio L.A. Witch is all about defying expectations. Sounding for all the world like San Diego’s own Dinettes as if produced by Meatloaf’s sound architect Jim Steinman, the West Coast trio is definitely a product of their L.A. environs, albeit as that city existed around 50 years ago, in the days of Phil Spector and the Doors. Not that there’s any Manson or Vampira style Hollywood witchery going on. Their name isn’t meant to evoke the supernatural so much as riotous West Coast girls in charge of how they look and sound. Their self-titled debut album was just released last month on Suicide Squeeze Records, but many of the songs have already been heard as singles released over the past several years. Particularly evocative of their overall leather-clad sound is the opening track, “Kill My Baby Tonight,” a fuzzy power rocker with teeth that would be beyond the capabilities of drifty ’luded-out acts they’re too often compared with, like Mazzy Star and Portishead, none of whom could crunch a riff if you deep fried it in oil first. Their impending show at the Casbah on December 22 is just the latest date in what’s been around two years of constant touring, though this will be the first leg where attendees will be able to pick up their CD at the merch booth, as well as a pink vinyl variant pressed in a limited run of 1500 copies (each of which includes a download card for a digital version).

The Ramones or Billy Idol like Third Eye Blind

Few bands are as polarizing as Third Eye Blind. You either scream along like a rock star whenever you hear one of their tunes or you curse the very mothers who birthed the perpetrators of such an unholy noise. There’s no denying that it’s lowest common denominator songwriting, like genetically engineered earworms designed to get you snarling your lip and pumping your fist, but that’s a formula that few would begrudge the Ramones or Billy Idol (both of whom 3IB cite as influences). It will have been a little over a year since their most recent release, the We Are Drugs EP, when they play Observatory North Park on January 1. Their current incarnation only includes one founding member from their formation in 1993, singer-guitarist Stephan Jenkins, and their almost-original drummer Brad Hargreaves, who joined a couple of years later, now backed by a trio of players picked up between 2001 and 2013. Their merch will include a new 36-page Summer Gods Tour book that comes with a live album, as well as a multidisc 20th-anniversary reissue of their self-titled album, featuring unreleased music and newly recorded tracks said to have been written for, but discarded from, that 1997 LP. In keeping with their oft-stated dedication to ecology and sustainability, bracelets made from used guitar strings once played by Jenkins and fellow stringsmith Krys Reid will be given to attendees who purchase VIP ticket packages.

Converge, cruising the world on Pitchfork fumes

Hard-rock heroes Converge have taken five years to record a studio followup to their 2012 album, All We Love We Leave Behind, which was so lauded on sites like Pitchfork and Consequence of Sound that the band has been cruising the world on its fumes ever since. Formed in 1990, the Massachusetts mathcore-metalcore group has staged dozens of tours and played countless festivals, where they’ve become such mainstays that singer Jacob Bannon was recently invited to curate next year’s Roadburn fest in the Netherlands. Their 2016 Roadburn set was released this past March as a concert album, Jane Live, featuring a performance of their entire 2001 LP Jane Doe. November will finally see their followup studio full-length, The Dusk In Us, which has already been preceded by three hard-driving singles that continue their penchant for brutal, bloody-sounding headbanging: “I Can Tell You About Pain,” “Under Duress,” and “Reptilian.” Their appearance at Brick By Brick on January 27 finds the band still fronted by founding duo Jacob Bannon (vocals) and Kurt Ballou (guitar), backed by the same Jane Doe rhythm section: bassist Nate Newton and drummer Ben Kollar. The show will be opened by Canadian-American metal trio Sumac and Salt Lake City metalcore band Cult Leader.

Husband-and-wife folk duo Shovels & Rope at the Belly Up

Hailing from Charleston, South Carolina, husband-and-wife folk duo Shovels & Rope weren’t married yet when they recorded their 2008 debut album under their own names, Michael Trent and Cary Ann Hearst. The album’s title became the duo’s moniker after they married the following year, though they both recorded solo albums before and after launching Shovels & Rope as a duo. A lot of people first came across them in a documentary that began screening at festivals in 2014, The Ballad of Shovels & Rope, which helped their third album released later that year, Swimmin’ Time, to reach number 21 on the Billboard Top 200 chart. They’ll still be touring in support of last year’s Little Seeds full-length when they headline the Belly Up on February 20, though their setlists also regularly include tracks from their individual solo careers as well as cuts from their 2015 covers album, Busted Jukebox Vol. 1, featuring tunes by Shakey Graves, Lucius, the Milk Carton Kids, Butch Walker, JD McPherson, Preservation Hall Jazz Band, and more.

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

Like a Maggie’s Positively Leopard-Skin Homesick Blues

Chuck Charles, Marmoto, Meidai, DFMK, Daring Greatly
Chris Mann at Martinis Above Fourth on November 9
Chris Mann at Martinis Above Fourth on November 9

Hillcrest’s Martinis Above Fourth has been mining a rich vein of TV-music-competition vets, often selling out the house, thanks to instantly famous faces who arrive with a built-in boob-tube fan base. In 2012, singer Chris Mann wowed the judges on the second season of The Voice, where the Wichita native managed to pull off everything from Andrea Bocelli to Coldplay, Simon & Garfunkel, and the Verve. He eventually came in fourth place, quickly moving on to a Christmas EP (a Walmart exclusive), followed a few weeks later by his debut studio full-length, Roads. Aided by the TV exposure and a major label push via Universal Republic, that album topped the U.S. Heatseakers chart, as well as hitting number five on the U.S. Classical chart. Before the year was out, he even had his own PBS special, A Mann For All Seasons. He’s gone on to singing for several movie soundtracks and touring with India.Arie and Indina Menzel, with a sophomore album, Constellation, released last year. That one wasn’t on a major label and pretty much sank with little notice, but he’s managed to console himself by becoming one of the most acclaimed vocalists to portray the title character in U.S. touring versions of The Phantom of the Opera, a role he’s taken on for over 700 performances. When he hits the stage at Martinis Above Fourth on November 9, expect to hear his new single, “I Wanna (One Dance) with Somebody,” a novelty mashup of Drake and Whitney Houston that has already earned the classically trained crooner a coveted slot on Dr. Demento’s Funny 25 list.

L.A. Witch, just riotous West Coast girls

The world may not have asked for an alt-country goth-pop band, but female trio L.A. Witch is all about defying expectations. Sounding for all the world like San Diego’s own Dinettes as if produced by Meatloaf’s sound architect Jim Steinman, the West Coast trio is definitely a product of their L.A. environs, albeit as that city existed around 50 years ago, in the days of Phil Spector and the Doors. Not that there’s any Manson or Vampira style Hollywood witchery going on. Their name isn’t meant to evoke the supernatural so much as riotous West Coast girls in charge of how they look and sound. Their self-titled debut album was just released last month on Suicide Squeeze Records, but many of the songs have already been heard as singles released over the past several years. Particularly evocative of their overall leather-clad sound is the opening track, “Kill My Baby Tonight,” a fuzzy power rocker with teeth that would be beyond the capabilities of drifty ’luded-out acts they’re too often compared with, like Mazzy Star and Portishead, none of whom could crunch a riff if you deep fried it in oil first. Their impending show at the Casbah on December 22 is just the latest date in what’s been around two years of constant touring, though this will be the first leg where attendees will be able to pick up their CD at the merch booth, as well as a pink vinyl variant pressed in a limited run of 1500 copies (each of which includes a download card for a digital version).

The Ramones or Billy Idol like Third Eye Blind

Few bands are as polarizing as Third Eye Blind. You either scream along like a rock star whenever you hear one of their tunes or you curse the very mothers who birthed the perpetrators of such an unholy noise. There’s no denying that it’s lowest common denominator songwriting, like genetically engineered earworms designed to get you snarling your lip and pumping your fist, but that’s a formula that few would begrudge the Ramones or Billy Idol (both of whom 3IB cite as influences). It will have been a little over a year since their most recent release, the We Are Drugs EP, when they play Observatory North Park on January 1. Their current incarnation only includes one founding member from their formation in 1993, singer-guitarist Stephan Jenkins, and their almost-original drummer Brad Hargreaves, who joined a couple of years later, now backed by a trio of players picked up between 2001 and 2013. Their merch will include a new 36-page Summer Gods Tour book that comes with a live album, as well as a multidisc 20th-anniversary reissue of their self-titled album, featuring unreleased music and newly recorded tracks said to have been written for, but discarded from, that 1997 LP. In keeping with their oft-stated dedication to ecology and sustainability, bracelets made from used guitar strings once played by Jenkins and fellow stringsmith Krys Reid will be given to attendees who purchase VIP ticket packages.

Converge, cruising the world on Pitchfork fumes

Hard-rock heroes Converge have taken five years to record a studio followup to their 2012 album, All We Love We Leave Behind, which was so lauded on sites like Pitchfork and Consequence of Sound that the band has been cruising the world on its fumes ever since. Formed in 1990, the Massachusetts mathcore-metalcore group has staged dozens of tours and played countless festivals, where they’ve become such mainstays that singer Jacob Bannon was recently invited to curate next year’s Roadburn fest in the Netherlands. Their 2016 Roadburn set was released this past March as a concert album, Jane Live, featuring a performance of their entire 2001 LP Jane Doe. November will finally see their followup studio full-length, The Dusk In Us, which has already been preceded by three hard-driving singles that continue their penchant for brutal, bloody-sounding headbanging: “I Can Tell You About Pain,” “Under Duress,” and “Reptilian.” Their appearance at Brick By Brick on January 27 finds the band still fronted by founding duo Jacob Bannon (vocals) and Kurt Ballou (guitar), backed by the same Jane Doe rhythm section: bassist Nate Newton and drummer Ben Kollar. The show will be opened by Canadian-American metal trio Sumac and Salt Lake City metalcore band Cult Leader.

Husband-and-wife folk duo Shovels & Rope at the Belly Up

Hailing from Charleston, South Carolina, husband-and-wife folk duo Shovels & Rope weren’t married yet when they recorded their 2008 debut album under their own names, Michael Trent and Cary Ann Hearst. The album’s title became the duo’s moniker after they married the following year, though they both recorded solo albums before and after launching Shovels & Rope as a duo. A lot of people first came across them in a documentary that began screening at festivals in 2014, The Ballad of Shovels & Rope, which helped their third album released later that year, Swimmin’ Time, to reach number 21 on the Billboard Top 200 chart. They’ll still be touring in support of last year’s Little Seeds full-length when they headline the Belly Up on February 20, though their setlists also regularly include tracks from their individual solo careers as well as cuts from their 2015 covers album, Busted Jukebox Vol. 1, featuring tunes by Shakey Graves, Lucius, the Milk Carton Kids, Butch Walker, JD McPherson, Preservation Hall Jazz Band, and more.

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

The “radical inclusiveness” of an openly LBGTQ+ pastor

To embrace the reality that faith is about action
Next Article

How Otay changed, secret TJ gardens, Mission Valley's future

San Diego State's Paseo project, building a Rancho Santa Fe mansion, downtown high rises never stop
Comments
0

Be the first to leave a comment.

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close