Quantcast
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Millions of U.S. jobs taken by foreigners

Consider the numbers

Why is this man smiling?
Why is this man smiling?

Post Title: Jobs, Immigration, and the “High Skilled” Worker Visas

Post Date: March 13, 2016

I object to the existing U.S. visa program that was tailored to allow so-called “high-skilled” workers into the country. Supposedly, these workers are let in to fill jobs that Americans can’t fill because they don’t have the skills. I don’t buy that, and I believe the purpose rests more in paying lower wages. But put that aside and consider the numbers, which are important. The annual number of visas granted are adding up. More than 150,000 workers are coming in annually on the “high-skilled” H-1B visas, with another 150,000 coming in on the related L-1 visas for skilled workers/managers being transferred from abroad by multinational corporations to their U.S. operations.

In just a few years this can mean millions of U.S. jobs taken by foreigners. And as these workers did not need to have sponsors in the United States to get in, their existing family ties in the United States are likely to be nil. Thus, they are likely to sponsor still more immigration into the United States by bringing their family members over.

These worker visas are renewable and could eventually lead to green cards for permanent stays. But the program was aimed at temporary workers who would go back.

If temporary work was truly the employer’s intention, it would be unlikely that a knowing American employer would give such employees important work to do, for fear that American know-how and innovation would flow back to foreign competitors when these workers traveled back to their countries. And to the extent that temporary work is the intention, it is almost insulting to say that Americans could not fill such unimportant jobs.

So this seemingly temporary and insignificant visa program takes on major significance. Millions of American jobs have been diverted to foreigners, jobs that Americans can fill now, or could easily be educated to fill in a few years.

It has been said time and time again that we are a nation of immigrants. But at some point any popular immigrant nation must begin to limit immigration, lest the whole world come to its shores. America enacted such limitations decades ago. So, the argument that we are an immigrant nation and must continue to be so now and in the future fails — in both logic and in fact.

Some say these so-called temporary visa laws were an end-run on our existing immigration policies. Some say the purpose was to place a lid on the wages American companies have to pay in the United States. Either way, my overriding point has to do with the decline of America.

I was never a fan of Steve Jobs as an executive. He may have been the very best design innovator the world has ever seen. He may have been a superb technician. But on an ethical level, I don’t know. He did seem to be involved in illegally back-dating stock options, and perhaps in illegally conspiring to keep wages down in Silicon Valley.

And as far a long-range executive planning is concerned, he did move his manufacturing abroad and started or accelerated the decline of America. In my view, Apple effectively created Samsung, a major competitor that will share Apple’s markets forever. In so doing, the American economy was ruined for American workers. Foreign workers thrive, while the wages of American workers have in fact been stagnating.

I recall reading about how Steve Jobs berated President Obama for not letting more highly skilled foreign workers into the United States — because, he said, the American universities were not graduating enough scientists/engineers/technicians for him to hire. My reaction to that was that the American universities could and would have educated enough qualified Americans if Steve Jobs had the jobs for them in the United States.

But with the absence of such jobs in America, fewer American students would undertake such studies, and thus the American universities would not be able to supply the talent. The American universities were not deficient, as proven by the inflow of students from abroad to study in these very areas. It was corporate America that created the problem. Then it tried to bring in foreign talent to address the problem.

Still, whether the purpose of the visa programs was really to obtain lower-cost workers looms into insignificance as compared to the millions of American manufacturing jobs moved offshore and the profits hoarded abroad. The visa program does exist, has been growing, and is of doubtful benefit, while costing the loss of millions of non-manufacturing jobs for Americans in America.

[Post edited for length]

Title: Insights on the News | Author: Walter Lamp | From: Pacific Beach | Blogging since: January 2016

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

Can You Escape?, Vote Ready Concert, I Love a Clean San Diego

Events August 13-August 15, 2020
Next Article

Will San Diego survive a fall without classical music?

Just as symphony, Mainly Mozart, La Jolla Music Society were getting stronger
Why is this man smiling?
Why is this man smiling?

Post Title: Jobs, Immigration, and the “High Skilled” Worker Visas

Post Date: March 13, 2016

I object to the existing U.S. visa program that was tailored to allow so-called “high-skilled” workers into the country. Supposedly, these workers are let in to fill jobs that Americans can’t fill because they don’t have the skills. I don’t buy that, and I believe the purpose rests more in paying lower wages. But put that aside and consider the numbers, which are important. The annual number of visas granted are adding up. More than 150,000 workers are coming in annually on the “high-skilled” H-1B visas, with another 150,000 coming in on the related L-1 visas for skilled workers/managers being transferred from abroad by multinational corporations to their U.S. operations.

In just a few years this can mean millions of U.S. jobs taken by foreigners. And as these workers did not need to have sponsors in the United States to get in, their existing family ties in the United States are likely to be nil. Thus, they are likely to sponsor still more immigration into the United States by bringing their family members over.

These worker visas are renewable and could eventually lead to green cards for permanent stays. But the program was aimed at temporary workers who would go back.

If temporary work was truly the employer’s intention, it would be unlikely that a knowing American employer would give such employees important work to do, for fear that American know-how and innovation would flow back to foreign competitors when these workers traveled back to their countries. And to the extent that temporary work is the intention, it is almost insulting to say that Americans could not fill such unimportant jobs.

So this seemingly temporary and insignificant visa program takes on major significance. Millions of American jobs have been diverted to foreigners, jobs that Americans can fill now, or could easily be educated to fill in a few years.

It has been said time and time again that we are a nation of immigrants. But at some point any popular immigrant nation must begin to limit immigration, lest the whole world come to its shores. America enacted such limitations decades ago. So, the argument that we are an immigrant nation and must continue to be so now and in the future fails — in both logic and in fact.

Some say these so-called temporary visa laws were an end-run on our existing immigration policies. Some say the purpose was to place a lid on the wages American companies have to pay in the United States. Either way, my overriding point has to do with the decline of America.

I was never a fan of Steve Jobs as an executive. He may have been the very best design innovator the world has ever seen. He may have been a superb technician. But on an ethical level, I don’t know. He did seem to be involved in illegally back-dating stock options, and perhaps in illegally conspiring to keep wages down in Silicon Valley.

And as far a long-range executive planning is concerned, he did move his manufacturing abroad and started or accelerated the decline of America. In my view, Apple effectively created Samsung, a major competitor that will share Apple’s markets forever. In so doing, the American economy was ruined for American workers. Foreign workers thrive, while the wages of American workers have in fact been stagnating.

I recall reading about how Steve Jobs berated President Obama for not letting more highly skilled foreign workers into the United States — because, he said, the American universities were not graduating enough scientists/engineers/technicians for him to hire. My reaction to that was that the American universities could and would have educated enough qualified Americans if Steve Jobs had the jobs for them in the United States.

But with the absence of such jobs in America, fewer American students would undertake such studies, and thus the American universities would not be able to supply the talent. The American universities were not deficient, as proven by the inflow of students from abroad to study in these very areas. It was corporate America that created the problem. Then it tried to bring in foreign talent to address the problem.

Still, whether the purpose of the visa programs was really to obtain lower-cost workers looms into insignificance as compared to the millions of American manufacturing jobs moved offshore and the profits hoarded abroad. The visa program does exist, has been growing, and is of doubtful benefit, while costing the loss of millions of non-manufacturing jobs for Americans in America.

[Post edited for length]

Title: Insights on the News | Author: Walter Lamp | From: Pacific Beach | Blogging since: January 2016

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Will San Diego survive a fall without classical music?

Just as symphony, Mainly Mozart, La Jolla Music Society were getting stronger
Next Article

The glamour and crime of Tijuana

Club Campestre abduction, cross-border prostitution, Russian-owned gym, TJ's new night scene
Comments
4
This comment was removed by the site staff for violation of the usage agreement.
June 22, 2018
This comment was removed by the site staff for violation of the usage agreement.
June 22, 2018

goood

June 24, 2018
This comment was removed by the site staff for violation of the usage agreement.
Aug. 10, 2018

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer News — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close