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"I feel like I'm forced to use my car."

San Diego Association of Governments loves them some freeway

San Diego Quality of Life Coalition speaks up for a world-class transportation system
San Diego Quality of Life Coalition speaks up for a world-class transportation system

A group of environmentalists and labor organizations billing themselves as the San Diego Quality of Life Coalition rallied in National City yesterday (January 25), calling on the San Diego Association of Governments to focus on mass transit as the agency drafts a plan to raise sales taxes countywide to fund transportation development.

The association’s current transit plan, funded by a half-cent sales tax, has already received considerable criticism from environmentalists and advocates for low-income workers who say it promotes mostly freeway expansion while pushing improvements to light rail and pedestrian options to the back end of the plan's timespan, which runs through 2050.

Beginning today, the association of governments will conduct a handful of outreach events, including "telephone town hall" meetings, soliciting emailed comments and inviting public comment at board meetings on how spending should be prioritized before releasing a final proposal. Coalition members, however, already have suggestions.

The group focuses on several avenues of investment aside from transit development. These include funding the purchase of land for dedication to open-space preserves, spending on storm-drain upgrades to improve local water quality, and increasing affordable housing development along already-existing transit corridors. Priority investment areas, they say, should include low-income communities most affected by existing roadways and their attendant pollution, such as Barrio Logan.

"This is potentially an $18 billion opportunity to invest in a socially and environmentally equitable manner," said Monique López, a policy advocate at Environmental Health Coalition. "The San Diego region cannot afford to spend new money on old ways of thinking.

"We want to partner with SANDAG, but only if their ballot initiative invests in clean air, better transit, safer streets and good jobs."

Jeanne Peterson, a La Mesa resident, addressed the media with complaints about the difficulties of using the city's patchwork public transit network.

"I've gotten my kids hooked on taking the trolley — they love it," Peterson says. "But going to a friend's house? We'd have to walk a half hour each way. An event in Point Loma? That's all but completely impossible.

"I feel like I'm forced to use my car. I'm a voter, and I'm really hoping SANDAG will address this and give us a world-class transit system."

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Comments
7

For any mass transit to work the city must be designed around it. San Diego was developed around the automobile. Now it is almost impossible to build a mass transit infrastructure to move people from where they live to where they work. Trolley and bus service is great if you live near a trolley/bus station and work near a trolley/bus station and that you don't work on weekends or nights. It takes hours to travel around San Diego on the transit system and it involves many transfers. It is ridiculous that the IBEW is shown supporting this nonsense. Most electricians need to be able to go from job to job with equipment and tools and could never use a transit system to do their job. Even now you need a car to get to a trolley station.

Jan. 27, 2016

alexclarke Have you ever visited San Francisco, New York, London or Paris??

Jan. 27, 2016

They were designed around people. Even though London and Paris are old cities they did not give in to urban sprawl. They have efficient mass transit because they were originally designed with people in mind. San Diego was planned by developers and bought-and-paid-for politicians who were only representing the construction industry and real estate interests. There was never a thought about people using a transit system to get anywhere. Even when there was a trolley it was discontinued because the developers wanted to expand outward.

Jan. 27, 2016

alexclark You said "For any mass transit to work the city must be designed around it" San Francisco, New York and especially London and Paris were NOT designed around mass transit and I know from personal experience that their public transportation systems are among the best in the world. Thanx for agreeing with me.

Jan. 27, 2016

Walk a half hour? Both ways? Oh, the humanity!

Jan. 27, 2016

That's what I thought, too. I guess she doesn't bike, either.

Jan. 27, 2016

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San Diego Quality of Life Coalition speaks up for a world-class transportation system
San Diego Quality of Life Coalition speaks up for a world-class transportation system

A group of environmentalists and labor organizations billing themselves as the San Diego Quality of Life Coalition rallied in National City yesterday (January 25), calling on the San Diego Association of Governments to focus on mass transit as the agency drafts a plan to raise sales taxes countywide to fund transportation development.

The association’s current transit plan, funded by a half-cent sales tax, has already received considerable criticism from environmentalists and advocates for low-income workers who say it promotes mostly freeway expansion while pushing improvements to light rail and pedestrian options to the back end of the plan's timespan, which runs through 2050.

Beginning today, the association of governments will conduct a handful of outreach events, including "telephone town hall" meetings, soliciting emailed comments and inviting public comment at board meetings on how spending should be prioritized before releasing a final proposal. Coalition members, however, already have suggestions.

The group focuses on several avenues of investment aside from transit development. These include funding the purchase of land for dedication to open-space preserves, spending on storm-drain upgrades to improve local water quality, and increasing affordable housing development along already-existing transit corridors. Priority investment areas, they say, should include low-income communities most affected by existing roadways and their attendant pollution, such as Barrio Logan.

"This is potentially an $18 billion opportunity to invest in a socially and environmentally equitable manner," said Monique López, a policy advocate at Environmental Health Coalition. "The San Diego region cannot afford to spend new money on old ways of thinking.

"We want to partner with SANDAG, but only if their ballot initiative invests in clean air, better transit, safer streets and good jobs."

Jeanne Peterson, a La Mesa resident, addressed the media with complaints about the difficulties of using the city's patchwork public transit network.

"I've gotten my kids hooked on taking the trolley — they love it," Peterson says. "But going to a friend's house? We'd have to walk a half hour each way. An event in Point Loma? That's all but completely impossible.

"I feel like I'm forced to use my car. I'm a voter, and I'm really hoping SANDAG will address this and give us a world-class transit system."

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Comments
7

For any mass transit to work the city must be designed around it. San Diego was developed around the automobile. Now it is almost impossible to build a mass transit infrastructure to move people from where they live to where they work. Trolley and bus service is great if you live near a trolley/bus station and work near a trolley/bus station and that you don't work on weekends or nights. It takes hours to travel around San Diego on the transit system and it involves many transfers. It is ridiculous that the IBEW is shown supporting this nonsense. Most electricians need to be able to go from job to job with equipment and tools and could never use a transit system to do their job. Even now you need a car to get to a trolley station.

Jan. 27, 2016

alexclarke Have you ever visited San Francisco, New York, London or Paris??

Jan. 27, 2016

They were designed around people. Even though London and Paris are old cities they did not give in to urban sprawl. They have efficient mass transit because they were originally designed with people in mind. San Diego was planned by developers and bought-and-paid-for politicians who were only representing the construction industry and real estate interests. There was never a thought about people using a transit system to get anywhere. Even when there was a trolley it was discontinued because the developers wanted to expand outward.

Jan. 27, 2016

alexclark You said "For any mass transit to work the city must be designed around it" San Francisco, New York and especially London and Paris were NOT designed around mass transit and I know from personal experience that their public transportation systems are among the best in the world. Thanx for agreeing with me.

Jan. 27, 2016

Walk a half hour? Both ways? Oh, the humanity!

Jan. 27, 2016

That's what I thought, too. I guess she doesn't bike, either.

Jan. 27, 2016

Sign in to comment

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4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
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