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Filipino Flair – The Philippines

Typical transportation in the Philippines
Typical transportation in the Philippines

“We’re the fun Asians.”

After soaking in the aforementioned statement from a Filipino friend and almost three years of living and working with a multitude of friendly Filipinos here in San Diego, I had to go. A few of the Philippines’ 7,107 islands on the western edge of the Pacific Ring of Fire called out to me. I had 6½ days to meet the Filipinos: challenge accepted.

Fifteen or so hours of flying gets you to this nation of 94 million, um, Asians, or Pacific Islanders, or Hispanic people. Wait, what are they?

The Negritos (short blackish people, go figure) arrived from Asian mainland followed by waves of Malayans from South China. Merchants from India, China, Japan and the Arab world extensively traded here for centuries.

Aside from a brief period of British occupation in the 1700s, Spain ruled the nation from 1565-1898. The Spanish named the islands “Las Islas Filipinas” in honor of their Philip II. The U.S. won the Spanish-American war in 1898 to extend colonial rule for the next forty years, until finally (whew) the Philippines achieved complete independence in 1946. And now they’ve arrived at this beautifully and intricately welded melting pot of a nation.

And the Filipinos seem to accept every part of what has made them, well... them. Located in Asia, they ubiquitously eat rice and prepare foods in small pieces (unlike us eating a 25-oz. steak at a time). But they would never think of using chopsticks unless eating Japanese or Chinese food.

Ask for chopsticks and you will be greeted with a variety of reactions – entertaining stuff. You'll usually find them shoveling food via fork into an awaiting spoon. Why? The Spanish taught them. They realize this and embrace the custom as their own. No knife, you ask? The Spanish weren’t comfortable with the local people having knives in their hands.

Watch the nationally televised impeachment trial of Chief Justice Corona and you will hear attorneys, judges, and witnesses effortlessly speaking the two official languages, Tagalog and English, in the courtroom – at times even within the same sentence.

Change the channel and you’ll see a live L.A. Lakers or Chicago Bulls game, the nation’s two favorite NBA teams. Change it again to watch some vintage NBA footage showcasing Larry Bird battling Magic Johnson. “Thanks, America,” the Philippines seems to be saying.

But then the kicker: the blatant Filipino flair. It’s the open hospitality. It’s a culture where locals shoot a generous smile at a stranger before anything else. It’s the unadulterated and unabashed singing. It could be a receptionist at the hostel belting out a Beatles tune, a Cebu Pacific Air stewardess asking passengers to the cabin’s microphone to canta a song, or a family eagerly accepting a foreigner into their home’s post-wedding celebration…with a legitimate home karaoke system displaying lyrics and, of course, vintage NBA moments in the background.

Sure, there are many gorgeous places to get to know in this country – you can even swim with whale sharks, if that’s your thing. But don’t overlook their most valuable resource: their people. And it’s confirmed: the Filipinos are the fun Asians. Salamat.

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Typical transportation in the Philippines
Typical transportation in the Philippines

“We’re the fun Asians.”

After soaking in the aforementioned statement from a Filipino friend and almost three years of living and working with a multitude of friendly Filipinos here in San Diego, I had to go. A few of the Philippines’ 7,107 islands on the western edge of the Pacific Ring of Fire called out to me. I had 6½ days to meet the Filipinos: challenge accepted.

Fifteen or so hours of flying gets you to this nation of 94 million, um, Asians, or Pacific Islanders, or Hispanic people. Wait, what are they?

The Negritos (short blackish people, go figure) arrived from Asian mainland followed by waves of Malayans from South China. Merchants from India, China, Japan and the Arab world extensively traded here for centuries.

Aside from a brief period of British occupation in the 1700s, Spain ruled the nation from 1565-1898. The Spanish named the islands “Las Islas Filipinas” in honor of their Philip II. The U.S. won the Spanish-American war in 1898 to extend colonial rule for the next forty years, until finally (whew) the Philippines achieved complete independence in 1946. And now they’ve arrived at this beautifully and intricately welded melting pot of a nation.

And the Filipinos seem to accept every part of what has made them, well... them. Located in Asia, they ubiquitously eat rice and prepare foods in small pieces (unlike us eating a 25-oz. steak at a time). But they would never think of using chopsticks unless eating Japanese or Chinese food.

Ask for chopsticks and you will be greeted with a variety of reactions – entertaining stuff. You'll usually find them shoveling food via fork into an awaiting spoon. Why? The Spanish taught them. They realize this and embrace the custom as their own. No knife, you ask? The Spanish weren’t comfortable with the local people having knives in their hands.

Watch the nationally televised impeachment trial of Chief Justice Corona and you will hear attorneys, judges, and witnesses effortlessly speaking the two official languages, Tagalog and English, in the courtroom – at times even within the same sentence.

Change the channel and you’ll see a live L.A. Lakers or Chicago Bulls game, the nation’s two favorite NBA teams. Change it again to watch some vintage NBA footage showcasing Larry Bird battling Magic Johnson. “Thanks, America,” the Philippines seems to be saying.

But then the kicker: the blatant Filipino flair. It’s the open hospitality. It’s a culture where locals shoot a generous smile at a stranger before anything else. It’s the unadulterated and unabashed singing. It could be a receptionist at the hostel belting out a Beatles tune, a Cebu Pacific Air stewardess asking passengers to the cabin’s microphone to canta a song, or a family eagerly accepting a foreigner into their home’s post-wedding celebration…with a legitimate home karaoke system displaying lyrics and, of course, vintage NBA moments in the background.

Sure, there are many gorgeous places to get to know in this country – you can even swim with whale sharks, if that’s your thing. But don’t overlook their most valuable resource: their people. And it’s confirmed: the Filipinos are the fun Asians. Salamat.

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Comments
5

We've had a look at what US upper-middle-class travel will soon be like--IF we HAVE an upper-middle-class. Let's hope that we will be able to gain a bit of Filipino-like character as we come to be further squeezed by the one percent.

March 8, 2012

Yep, that Filipino way is something to emulate no doubt..

March 9, 2012

Glad you liked your trip. Even the fastfood is interesting. Smaller serving of fries and that rice noodle in orange crab fat too. Sunbathing in beaches or hiking in the cold mountains up north. Haircuts that cost from $1-$5!

March 15, 2012

There are so much things to talk about our culture.I have had similar experiences when I traveled with different nationalities.I learned so much from them.The more we learn to know about the country and its people,the more we appreciate and understand our own.These cultural experiences taught us about who we are.I am glad you liked your Philippine experience. I hope that as we immerse ourselves in the multitude of pilgrims, we will not lost our identity but acquire the good from them.(zippyrover)

March 16, 2012

JPINPI - I will need to be going back to PI for those rice noodles and hiking for sure. denden - Well said.

Sept. 15, 2012

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4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
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