Quantcast
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Walkability's Price

A controversial streetscape project for Chula Vista’s downtown will come before the city council April 13.

The project involves narrowing a portion of Third Avenue to a single lane and removing trees in cement planters. According to project manager Gary Williams, the Third Avenue redesign will take place between H Street and Madrona Avenue, though “with competitive bids may extend to F Street.”

The design proposal includes narrowing Third Avenue just north of the H Street intersection, though Williams says, “We haven’t completely bought off on that.” Medians will also be built to slow traffic.

Some residents have expressed concern that constriction of traffic on Third Avenue will divert vehicles to residential streets like Second Avenue. Williams says the goal of the project is to create walkability and to “unclutter the streetscape.” He says the tree canopy will be maintained by planting new trees and that the number of parking spaces will not be reduced.

Controversy also stems from the project cost: $3,700,000. There are those who would rather see money spent on projects such as a music venue that would attract more people and contribute to the revitalization of Third Avenue. But Williams says the grant money from SANDAG is specifically for “Smart Growth” and is predicated on deemphasizing car traffic and increasing pedestrian traffic.

Money will also come from the Chula Vista Redevelopment Agency and from the Federal Recovery Act. Though the plan is “99.9% complete,” Williams said that the City is still involved in public outreach.

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

The glamour and crime of Tijuana

Club Campestre abduction, cross-border prostitution, Russian-owned gym, TJ's new night scene
Next Article

Imagine a pedestrian-friendly Kearny Mesa

Hard to consider history in 30-year plan

A controversial streetscape project for Chula Vista’s downtown will come before the city council April 13.

The project involves narrowing a portion of Third Avenue to a single lane and removing trees in cement planters. According to project manager Gary Williams, the Third Avenue redesign will take place between H Street and Madrona Avenue, though “with competitive bids may extend to F Street.”

The design proposal includes narrowing Third Avenue just north of the H Street intersection, though Williams says, “We haven’t completely bought off on that.” Medians will also be built to slow traffic.

Some residents have expressed concern that constriction of traffic on Third Avenue will divert vehicles to residential streets like Second Avenue. Williams says the goal of the project is to create walkability and to “unclutter the streetscape.” He says the tree canopy will be maintained by planting new trees and that the number of parking spaces will not be reduced.

Controversy also stems from the project cost: $3,700,000. There are those who would rather see money spent on projects such as a music venue that would attract more people and contribute to the revitalization of Third Avenue. But Williams says the grant money from SANDAG is specifically for “Smart Growth” and is predicated on deemphasizing car traffic and increasing pedestrian traffic.

Money will also come from the Chula Vista Redevelopment Agency and from the Federal Recovery Act. Though the plan is “99.9% complete,” Williams said that the City is still involved in public outreach.

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

No longer a David, Stone Brewing recast as a Goliath

The foe of big beer tangles with small breweries over trademarks, including a local IPA
Next Article

Can You Escape?, Vote Ready Concert, I Love a Clean San Diego

Events August 13-August 15, 2020
Comments
4

These things don't warp space time. The suburbs are not going to become ghost towns. People will still drive because it take a lot longer to walk or take transit. Let's hope driving never takes as long as the bus because then we will never see our families or have time to exercise.

March 26, 2010

I am unconvinced that wasting another $3,000,000 to narrow streets, remove planters, slow traffic and shorten crosswalks will do it. Why am I supposed to go to Third Avenue? To visit the tattoo shop, or to count the vacancies in the Gateway Class A Office Building? I recall Rod Davis, the Chamber of Commerce CEO, ten years ago telling us it would be the catalyst to revive Third Avenue with throngs of pedestrians. It never happened and he is long gone. Or maybe to watch the students come and go from classes in yet another failed redevelopment project that was going to save Third Avenue? . I think it was Einstein who noted that doing the same thing over and over expecting a different result is a sign of insanity. I don’t want to believe that so many well-paid people don’t get it. Though the physical environment is important it is the type of stores that will ultimately change Third Avenue. Someone must be capable of looking beyond the next million dollar grants for yet another doomed to fail physical environment fix.

March 28, 2010

I have attended a few public meetings where the "smart growth" banner was saluted. The main objectives are fewer automobile trips and the effort to combat climate change. While reducing our carbon use is an honorable goal, limiting the flow of traffic or just shifting it onto other streets is not the way to accomplish this. Making it difficult to drive to a favored location will not lead us to take a bus, we will simply not support the Third Ave. businesses that need us so desperately. It is also true that there are not enough popular destinations in the downtown area. Just because grant money is dangled in the face of Chula Vista, we are not obligated to press forward with a bad plan.

March 28, 2010

Narrowing Chula Vista's Third Avenue and widening the sidewalks to accommodate excessive foot traffic would be a good idea that wisely followed what other cities have done to alleviate such a problem. However, as anyone who frequents "downtown" Chula Vista knows, too many people buzzing up and down the street is certainly not a problem. To spend over three million dollars on this unnecessary and potentially harmful project is an irresponsible use of taxpayers' money. About the only justification would be if the city's workers, who have been hit hard by budget cuts, actually gained from the hours of work that would be created.

March 29, 2010

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer News — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close