Tundra had also taken up hunting. And he was very good at it. Many mornings I opened our front door to find gifts from him on our front porch: eviscerated mice, gophers, lizards, and birds, many, many birds. But no matter how good a hunter he had become, he was never good enough to capture one of the OB Parrots. The OB Parrots are just that, a flock of wild green parrots that live in the tall palm trees of the local neighborhoods. Sometimes they fly a few miles north to visit PB, MB, and La Jolla, but they seem to prefer OB above all the other nearby beaches. There are many theories as to how the OB Parrots came to be. There’s the local breeder whose property had caught fire allowing the birds to escape theory. The parrot carrying truck crash theory is popular, and there is, among many others still, the migrating too far from South America theory. It’s hard to say if anyone “really” knows how the OB Parrots arrived, but the numerous opinions and speculations always make for amiable drunken debates at the local taverns.

Sometimes the parrots perched on the telephone wire above our yard. Tundra lay beneath them, watching them with his alert green eyes, daring them to come closer. The OB Parrots talked loudly to each other as their feet gripped the telephone wire. They pretended to ignore Tundra, but, of course, they were watching him very closely.

Comments

Sign in to comment

Join our
newsletter list

Enter to win $25 at Broken Yolk Cafe

Each newsletter subscription
means another chance to win!

Close