• Outdoor San Diego alerts

"June Gloom," the cool and intermittently overcast conditions likely to dominate the beach and coastal areas through the remainder of this month, mocks the already sizzling temperatures inland. If it weren't for the ocean's enormous resistance to changes in temperature, the hottest weather along the coast would occur soon after the summer solstice -- June 21. Our warmest beach weather will probably not arrive until August or even early September, just about the time the ocean water temperatures are peaking.

Ocean Water Temperatures are rising into the mid-60s this month, perhaps to reach the 70s in July or August. The usual early-summer cool weather along San Diego's coastline, which is disappointing to many tourists, is mostly caused by the sluggish warming of the ocean water. The payoff will come later: as the ocean gives up heat absorbed during the sunny summer months, we'll enjoy warm days and evenings well into autumn.

  • Outdoor San Diego alerts

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Comments

Robert Johnston June 3, 2010 @ 9:21 p.m.

This should be required reading for every tourista from back East who flaps their gums about the weather here in San Diego County. It can't be sunny all the time here--without the "June Gloom," clouds, fog, and rain? It would be "Death Valley-By-The-Sea" here!

As for me? I love the "May Grey/June Gloom" season--it's easier on my skin, plus I know that the "Sunny San Diego" weather the touristas crave is just around the corner.

--LPR

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Duhbya June 4, 2010 @ 6:47 a.m.

LaPlaca - The most descriptive term I have come across that characterizes the overall SD climate is found in a report from the Thirties about Kearny Mesa's at that time ubiquitous, but now disappearing vernal pools. The term used was "foggy desert". You're exactly right about the saving grace of the ocean.

http://www.jstor.org/pss/1930741

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