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The San Diego County unemployment rate dropped to 7.4% in August from a revised 7.8% in July, as 2900 jobs were added. Over the year, employment rose by 14,800 jobs, according to the California Employment Development Department.

Leisure and hospitality jobs gained 3,300 in the month. Government, which has been weak, added 1000 jobs.

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Comments

John Kitchin Sept. 20, 2013 @ 10:33 p.m.

Readers need to know that the Unemployment Rate is no longer the number of folks not working, like it was before Richard Nixon changed it years ago. It is, basically, the number losing their job very recently, minus those gaining employment very recently. Under the old formula, the percentage not employed or working only part-time, or working at jobs below their educational level, the Real Unemployment Rate is something like 79%. That would be calculating it pre-Nixon formula.

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Don Bauder Sept. 21, 2013 @ 7:35 p.m.

John Kitchin: Sorry, 79% is wrong. The percentage of people not employed, or employed part-time when desiring to work full-time, has been in the 15%-16% range. Best, Don Bauder

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aardvark Sept. 22, 2013 @ 11:26 a.m.

I find it interesting--and troubling--that there are 4 consecutive stories under your name and "recent articles" are titled, "Local unemployment rate falls to 7.4%", then is followed by, "San Diegans remained mired in low incomes, poverty", then, "California homes remain nation's most expensive", followed by, "American households ailing; Wall Street rejoices". So, you have improving unemployment numbers, but more people aren't making enough money in those jobs, they can't afford to buy a home due to the high prices, and households keep falling behind, but Big Business is booming. Not a good scenario.

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Don Bauder Sept. 22, 2013 @ 9:04 p.m.

aardvark: So true. The average American is falling behind. The superrich are gaining tremendously. It's not healthy. Best, Don Bauder

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Burwell Sept. 22, 2013 @ 2:03 p.m.

If you drive around San Diego it's very clear that most residents are poor. Hillcrest, North Park, and City heights are being bulldozed to made room for giant outsized apartment buildings to house the burgeoning poor who live three or four to an apartment. No one with options in life lives in such degraded conditions, breathing cigarette smoke, waking up all night to the sound of flusing toilets, disturbances from drug addicts who can't sleep, etc. Wealthy investors are happy to indulge the mobs of poor who are flocking here from the Midwest and other areas destined for a life of abject poverty in the highest cost area of the country.

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Yankeedoodle Sept. 22, 2013 @ 3:37 p.m.

Burwell: I agree with you in principle but we live in North Park and I do not see the bulldozing to which you refer. I know that this occurred in the '70s on Adams Ave where all those cheap apt bldgs are, and some multi-units from that era are mixed in on many streets. Near the infamous JIB someone bulldozed a large bldg and now there will be another large bldg, to include 27 condos. I do not see much difference there. Finally, some people, like me, like to live in apartment buildings. I live in a house but that is because I lost the argument. Can't win them all.

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Don Bauder Sept. 22, 2013 @ 9:11 p.m.

Yankeedoodle: Both you and Burwell are seeing the result of the maldistribution of wealth and income. The nation is top-heavy. Look what followed the era of the Robber Barons. We are now more uneven than we were then. We have a plutonomy (an economy that lives off consumption by the affluent) and a plutocracy to keep it going. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Sept. 22, 2013 @ 9:07 p.m.

Burwell: The upper 1% is feasting off the lower 99% -- or you could say the upper 10% is feasting off the bottom 90%. San Diego is an example of this sorry phenomenon. By desstroying the middle class, those at the top of the food chain don't realize they are ruining their own markets. When they learn, it will be too late. Best, Don Bauder

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