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A consultant and land planner hired by Doug Manchester released additional details on his proposed development of UT San Diego's Mission Valley headquarters yesterday during an environmental scoping meeting.

Plans for the site include the construction of 4 buildings on the 12.86-acres property for a total of six. The plans include construction of a 23-story residential tower, a 9-story office tower, a three-story building for town homes as well as two parking garages and the existing 5-story main building currently home to the UT San Diego.

Perry Dealy, a real estate developer and former employee of UT San Diego owner Doug Manchester, was joined by planner Randi Coopersmith from Latitude 33 to provide details on the plans.

According to the short ten-minute presentation, Manchester hopes to build up the site while at the same time improve public access to the San Diego River.

"It's an area that we spent the most time on," said Dealy when discussing the San Diego River. "We wanted public access to the river. We put trails in, a small cafe, public benches and public artwork."

A member of the San Diego Audubon Society expressed concerns about runoff into the river and the introduction of invasive species to the floodplain.

The scoping meeting was the first step in the permitting process. In the coming months, Manchester and company will attempt to answer the environmental concerns identified by the City in their initial study of the proposal. Those concerns include issues with traffic, air and water quality, noise, parking, and density.

http://docs.sandiego.gov/citybulletin_publicnotices/CEQA/Union%2520Tribune%2520Mixed%2520Use%2520Notice%2520of%2520Preperation.pdf

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Comments

Wabbit March 28, 2013 @ noon

"improving public access to the San Diego River?" It's a flood control channel. It's also pretty darn close to the contaminated soil under the Stadium. The area floods pretty much every year...most buildings already have pumps in their basements to help clear the water. Where's the closest fire station? Who is going to foot the bill for the public facilities needed to support this development, when Mission Valley has been overgrown compared to the public services for at least 20 years.

What could possibly be wrong with all these big shot plans?

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