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Ryan Leaf, the quarterback who was supposed to turn the Chargers around in 1998, has been moved from a drug treatment center to the Montana State Prison, according to the Associated Press. Leaf was charged with threatening a staff member at the treatment center and not following his treatment plan. Leaf was charged last spring with breaking into two houses and stealing prescriptions near Great Falls. He pleaded guilty in May to burglary and criminal possession of dangerous drugs. According to the Associated Press, his five-year sentence called for spending nine moths in a locked drug treatment facility as an alternative to prison. Now he will serve his sentence in the Deer Lodge Prison. Leaf apparently wrote in a report that he wanted to throw a staffer against the wall and smash a glass into the man's head. Leaf will remain in state prison until June 30, when he becomes eligible for parole.

When the Chargers traded away good players to get in line to take Leaf, the Union-Tribune wrote that Leaf would not only turn the team around, but would create so much goodwill that he would turn the City around.

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Comments

SurfPuppy619 Jan. 18, 2013 @ 5:36 p.m.

The LA Times ran this yesterday and I was thinking of sending it over to you.

Leaf's biggest problem is himself. He has a major attitude, and he cannot cure the problem. He has had numerous chances and blows all of them, he belongs in prison.

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Don Bauder Jan. 18, 2013 @ 7:40 p.m.

SP: In a way it is sad, because he is clearly addicted. He needs help but probably is in denial. Best, Don Bauder

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Duhbya Jan. 20, 2013 @ 11:19 a.m.

If only he could turn over a new leaf.

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SurfPuppy619 Jan. 20, 2013 @ 1:34 p.m.

LOL...I bet the apply (and leaf) didn't fall far from the tree.

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Burwell Jan. 18, 2013 @ 6:08 p.m.

Maybe the Editors-In-God at the Union Tribune thought Leaf was going to be the next Jack Kemp. Leaf's going to wind up dead in an alley with a needle sticking out of his arm,

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Don Bauder Jan. 18, 2013 @ 7:42 p.m.

Burwell: It's hard to envision Leaf in Congress, or as a vice presidential candidate. Best, Don Bauder

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Visduh Jan. 18, 2013 @ 8:25 p.m.

He was a most personable young guy, tall and with a great smile. But his best days, those at WSU, were already behind him. The behavior he displayed while he was with the local team was just bizarre, especially when he had $ millions at stake. There is a real issue with those who glorify a young and impressionable man because all the attention can destroy a few of them. He appears to have been one of the easily distracted and ultimately destroyed. This stint in the state prison at Deer Lodge will probably not be all that traumatic for him--that prison isn't Folsom or San Quentin or Pelican Bay. It's smaller than our county lockups--heck, the state doesn't have quite a million residents--and isn't known for being really hard on criminals.

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SurfPuppy619 Jan. 18, 2013 @ 10:03 p.m.

Lea let his ego get the best of him......I will never forget when some reporter asked him some routine question he didn't like and he said"..I was the #2 pick in the NFL draft..."...then when the lineman charged a $1,000 dinner on his credit card- a joke and right of passage for new stars- he flipped out.....then came the attitude with the Chargers GM, what was he thinking?????? He was NOT an NFL star, he was a COLLEGE star, for a couple of years....like I said, he has an attitude problem and never grew out of it.

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Don Bauder Jan. 19, 2013 @ 7:12 a.m.

SP: Yes, attitude problem, but as we have been discussing, a drug problem. In all our discussions of societal problems (increasing thievery, homicides, other violence, etc.) we don't pay enough attention to drugs. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Jan. 19, 2013 @ 7:08 a.m.

Visduh: The Chargers apparently did not do their homework when they sacrificed players to move up in the draft and get Leaf. (Peyton Manning went first.) Now, he has to kick the addiction, and it appears he isn't ready to do that yet. Best, Don Bauder

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tomjohnston Jan. 19, 2013 @ 9:46 a.m.

In many cases it's kind of hard to really evaluate the personality, judgement and to a certain extent character of a college junior, in terms of how they will pan out playing in the NFL. As I recall, Leaf didn't have any troubles at Wazzou. But as a player, Manning and Leaf were pretty comparable in their careers. Leaf's 3 yr stats were pretty close to Manning's in most areas. He also took Wazzou to the Rose Bowl and I think was 3rd in the Heisman vote that year to Manning's second. Don't get me wrong, as a pro he was THE all-time bust, but in college he was a star. He was to the West Coast what Manning was to the SEC. I think the Chargers did what they had to do. I had to look it up to be sure and I was. The really had no viable options at QB because Stan Humphries retired. I doubt any free agent QB with talent was going to SD because they were so bad. They really didn't have much choice. The best they could to was trade up with Phoenix and take the 2nd best QB in the draft. Did they give up too much? In hindsight, you could say yes, because Leaf didn't pan out. But had he turned out to be even only an average NFL qb, I would have said no. One of the players had a pretty good career as an all purpose back and returner, but even though he played 4 more years, it was with 4 different teams. The other player was cut his second year in Phoenix. They did give up a 1st and a 2nd in '98 and a 2nd in '99; pretty steep, but at the same time, had he performed as comparably to Manning in the NFL as he did in college, I doubt anybody would have given it a second thought. By coincidence, I remember hearing something interesting related to this during the season. It was during a Pittsburgh game. One of the announcers to referred to the fact that the Pitt QB at the time was the 3rd stringer, playing because of injuries, and happened to be the 3rd QB drafted in 1998 when he was drafted next to last in the second round, which was 58 picks after Leaf was picked, and that of the 6 QB's picked in 1998, only 2 others were still playing. They were Manning of course, the very first pick and next to last QB pickes, Matt Hasselback who was picked 187th. In another bizarre twist, the very last qb picked was one Moses Moreno, by the Bears at 232nd. Does the name ring a bell? Perhaps to some Charger fans it might. Moreno was with the Bears for 1 season and was the traded, to of all places, San Diego, where a year later he replaces, yes you guessed it, an "ineffective" Ryan Leaf as the starter in only the 3rd game of the season,playing in 6 and starting in 2 games. AND, to get even weirder, a year later, the Chargers drafted Moreno's brother out of USC. Talk about your six degrees of Kevin Bacon!!! LOL

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SurfPuppy619 Jan. 19, 2013 @ 9:56 a.m.

The Cgargers lso had a hot QB, I have to look him up, a red head kid. Here he is Billy Joe Tolliver- he flopped too; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Billy_Jo...

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Don Bauder Jan. 19, 2013 @ 4:45 p.m.

SurfPup: I don't remember that Tolliver was such a hot prospect. Didn't the Chargers pick him up from some other team? I remember the joke: "There is somebody who can overthrow Saddam Hussein. Billy Joe Tolliver." Best, Don Bauder

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tomjohnston Jan. 20, 2013 @ 4:44 a.m.

According to surfpuppy619's link, the Chargers gave up 3 draft picks to get him in the second round. According to NFL stas, he was a loser. The Chargers have only had 2 great QB's in their entire existence: John Hadl and Dan Fouts. Humphries is close, but not quite there with Fouts and Hadl.

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SurfPuppy619 Jan. 20, 2013 @ 1:32 p.m.

Rivers is as good as any of the three you listed, even Fouts, but the Fouts era was with different receiver rules.

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Don Bauder Jan. 20, 2013 @ 7:07 p.m.

tomjohnston: Isn't Rivers, the current quarterback, supposed to be good? Best, Don Bauder

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Visduh Jan. 19, 2013 @ 10:02 a.m.

All true, I suppose, but what Don is pointing out is the ridiculous praise heaped upon Leaf by the U-T before he'd done anything for the team. Through no fault of his own, he became an icon of U-T sports foolishness and gross overstatement.

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Don Bauder Jan. 19, 2013 @ 4:49 p.m.

Visduh: Leaf was contemptuous of the press but appears to have read his own clippings too much. Best, Don Bauder

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SurfPuppy619 Jan. 19, 2013 @ 7:50 p.m.

Leaf's ego was like Donald Trump, but without the success.

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Don Bauder Jan. 19, 2013 @ 11:08 a.m.

tomjohnston: I remember reading that Leaf did have problems at Washington State, and there was a coach who covered up for him. But I read that some time ago, and I don't know that the sources were reliable. I remember Bobby Beathard taking flak for not doing his homework on Leaf. However, when you have a bust of that magnitude, you are going to have people saying that all the signs were there. Best, Don Bauder

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monaghan Jan. 19, 2013 @ 12:24 p.m.

Ryan Leaf, grist for the mill of professional football and now a drug addict in state prison. What a waste. It is an understatement to say, "We don't pay enough attention to drugs."

While we are busy medicating and legalizing pot, I recently heard an addiction specialist from Denver on the radio describe present-day marijuana's hugely-increased amounts of THC, its damaging permanent effect on developing adolescent brains, its habituating properties and its role as a gateway drug for regular users. He said he hoped we would not replicate the twin disasters that alcohol and tobacco have brought to our society.

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Don Bauder Jan. 19, 2013 @ 4:48 p.m.

monaghan: I have heard today's marijuana is stronger and more damaging to youth. But I haven't looked closely into the matter. Best, Don Bauder

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bvagency Jan. 19, 2013 @ 12:56 p.m.

tomjohnston, all very good points in comparing Leaf's performance on the field to that of Mannings. However, when it comes to NFL scouting, on the field performance is usually not the only thing being looked at. Backgrounds are usually checked very thoroughly. In Mannings case, he had the bloodlines of an NFL dad, was a superb student and an excellent all around person and leader. A further look at Leaf's background showed a kid with incredible talent, but not very well liked by teammates, below average performance in class, and other red flags. Had the Chargers not been in such a need for a QB, and had they done their due diligence, they would have passed on him and we could have avoided his association with them and our town.

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Don Bauder Jan. 19, 2013 @ 4:51 p.m.

bvagency: These are the red flags that the Chargers either missed or ignored. Best, Don Bauder

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Visduh Jan. 19, 2013 @ 8:37 p.m.

That's funny! Isn't "below average performance in class" more or less the norm for college athletes? There have been a few exceptions to that rule, but not many. If Manning was actually a strong student, then that said much for him. If the NFL draft looked at grade point averages, difficulty of the major field of study, and general academic matters, it would have to dismiss over 90% of the jocks. To check out Leaf's potential, one had to look at other things. And yes, I recollect some allegations that the WSU coach had covered for him while he was on the team. Seems that if you want to turn a stint at coaching in Pullman into a coaching stepping stone, rather then a career ender, you better report nothing short of perfection. Leaf's standing in the NFL draft gave his college coach great leverage to escape WSU and get a fatter deal. Somebody must remember the name of that coach and where he went from there.

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Don Bauder Jan. 19, 2013 @ 9:26 p.m.

Visduh: You're right: if the pros worried about athletes' grade point averages, hardly anybody would be drafted. But Manning and Leaf were quarterbacks. Manning clearly has intelligence, as he shows on the field. Leaf supposedly had all the tools but didn't have it upstairs. Best, Don Bauder

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SurfPuppy619 Jan. 19, 2013 @ 11:22 p.m.

Steve Young is a law school graduate, as was former Raider Wide Receiver Bob Chandler...............

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Don Bauder Jan. 20, 2013 @ 7:09 p.m.

SP: Of course, a law school degree is no guarantee of financial success, as you have noted before. Best, Don Bauder

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tomjohnston Jan. 20, 2013 @ 4:20 a.m.

Not sure if you're being sarcastic or not re Wazzoo being a stepping stone for a coach. If you're being serious, then yeah, I know who he is and if Leaf's standing in the draft gave him leverage, boy, it sure was a short lever and then a long step.....down. BTW, not sure how strong a student Manning was, but he did graduate in 3 yrs with a degree speech communications. His GPA was around 3.6 which was said to be the highest in that particular field of study and I believe was a Phi Beta Kappa.

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Don Bauder Jan. 20, 2013 @ 7:11 p.m.

tomjohnston: If he made Phi Beta Kappa I would say he was a very good student. Best, Don Bauder

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tomjohnston Jan. 20, 2013 @ 10:53 p.m.

Don Bauder, he made Phi Beta Kappa in 1997.

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Don Bauder Jan. 21, 2013 @ 7:06 a.m.

tomjohnston: Then huzzahs for Manning in the classroom. Best, Don Bauder

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Fred Williams Jan. 19, 2013 @ 11:54 p.m.

It's really tempting to gloat...I remember the fawning over-the-top coverage of Leaf at the time, and was disgusted. That he then went on to perform so badly at his job, while acting like a spoiled jerk, gave me great shadenfreude.

But now it's beyond that...here is a young man who was created and then destroyed by football. Like Junior Seau, this is a tragedy. Unlike Seau, there's still a chance to save this guy's life.

So I ask where are all the football fans, the team owners, the sportswriters? What are they doing to help this guy?

Prison isn't the answer. He's going to come out worse than he went in. Criminalizing addiction makes no sense whatsoever, and now that he's been thrown out of treatment, it seems everyone has given up on him.

Those who claim to love the game of football have a responsibility here. This tragedy is the creation of the fans, owners, sportswriters...if he ends up dead, there's blood on their hands.

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Don Bauder Jan. 20, 2013 @ 7:13 p.m.

Fred: You make sensible points. Is it wise to throw addicts in prison? Best, Don Bauder

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DataJuncture Jan. 20, 2013 @ 10:18 a.m.

Odd there's no mention of potential concussion damage. Everyone waxes on about player after player doing all kinds of odd behavior but, it seems only after they die do they put two and two together.

So many are quick to judge Leaf (a Brilliant quarterback in college no?) because of his mannerisms. Weren't they saying the same things about Junior Seau [R.I.P. Junior] (exhibiting all kinds of strange behaviors).

Sure, Leaf may have a drug problem but, what his brain is telling him may very well be due to the tolerance we've had in seeing our young and old players sacrifice their bodies for our entertainment.

What can we do to help prevent future generations of football players to avoid these situations? Or, are we happy just sitting around and judging?

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Don Bauder Jan. 20, 2013 @ 7:16 p.m.

DataJuncture: I don't know if Leaf was ever concussed. But Seau never had a reported concussion, either. Of course, Seau played 20 years, and Leaf only played a few. Best, Don Bauder

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gekko Jan. 20, 2013 @ 10:38 a.m.

Visduh, Leaf's coach at WSU was Mike Price. Price was hired by Alabama in December of 2002. Price was fired in May of 2003 before he coached one game. He was fired for a drinking binge at a Florida Strip club.

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Visduh Jan. 20, 2013 @ 11:09 a.m.

My point was that Price (thanks for providing his name) did manage to get those winning seasons and Rose Bowl appearance by WSU as leverage to land the slot at Alabama. Successor to the dynasty of Paul "Bear" Bryant and all that. That was a big step up in college coaching, as in it doesn't get any better. His downfall was an anomaly.

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tomjohnston Jan. 20, 2013 @ 6:16 p.m.

Visduh, I would agree that his final 2 seasons and the Rose Bowl appearance in his last season at Wazzoo helped land him the Alabama job, at least temporarily. But that was 5 yrs after Leaf's final season. My point in my previous comment was that I doubt that Leaf's final season had much to do with the Alabama job. The fact that he was Alabama's 3rd choice seems to reinforce that thought. And I think the stripper that spent the night in his hotel room also had a lot to do with his demise. Just my opinion. Opinions vary.

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Don Bauder Jan. 21, 2013 @ 7:10 a.m.

Visduh: It always interests me that coaches have so much at stake in college sports. But only a few players -- those who might go on to the pros -- do. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Jan. 20, 2013 @ 7:17 p.m.

gekko: I faintly remember that incident. Was he entertaining potential high school recruits at the strip club? Best, Don Bauder

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gekko Jan. 20, 2013 @ 7:29 p.m.

Don, I don't believe Price was recruiting. I believe he was in Florida for a golf tournament. Price ended up at Texas El Paso. How the mighty fall.

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SurfPuppy619 Jan. 20, 2013 @ 8:24 p.m.

Leaf was a QB coach in TX for a season, was he with Price????

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tomjohnston Jan. 20, 2013 @ 10:43 p.m.

He was at West Texas A&M. He resigned just after the start of his 3rd season there after a police investigation into reports that he illegally obtained prescription painkillers. Apparently he was a pretty good QB coach because they became one of the top DII passing offenses. He also was the men's golf coach. You have to wonder if the brainstem tumor had anything to do with his erratic behavior the last few years.

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Don Bauder Jan. 21, 2013 @ 12:13 p.m.

tomjohnston: I am not aware of a brainstem tumor. Best, Don Bauder

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tomjohnston Jan. 21, 2013 @ 1:10 p.m.

don bauder, Not aware of what it is or that he was diagnosed with one and had surgery to remove it a couple of years ago?

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Don Bauder Jan. 21, 2013 @ 7:17 a.m.

SP: He was an assistant coach at a smaller school, as I recall. I don't believe it lasted very long. Best, Don Bauder

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tomjohnston Jan. 21, 2013 @ 7:48 a.m.

Don Bauder read my above comment. It was a DII school and he left partway thru his 3rd season. http://leaf.davidzingler.com/coach.html

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Don Bauder Jan. 21, 2013 @ 12:14 p.m.

tomjohnston: I wonder how he treated the players -- both football players and golfers. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Jan. 21, 2013 @ 7:13 a.m.

gekko: There were recruiting incidents like that at the University of Colorado. Young high school recruits were taken to some wild parties, spent some time with some wild coeds and, as I recall, drugs. It was a big scandal at the time. Best, Don Bauder

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gekko Jan. 20, 2013 @ 10:41 a.m.

Don, Let's not foget that Leaf married Ray Lucia's daughter, a former Charger cheerleader. Also, it was reported in the UT that Ray Lucia hired Leaf at his firm. Neither of these two situations worked out.

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Don Bauder Jan. 20, 2013 @ 7:19 p.m.

gekko: I know the marriage failed and I am quite sure that Leaf didn't work out at Lucia's firm, either. Best, Don Bauder

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SurfPuppy619 Jan. 20, 2013 @ 8:25 p.m.

Of course the marriage failed, heck, you would probably want to kill Leaf after two weeks with the guy, or kill yourself.

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Don Bauder Jan. 21, 2013 @ 7:15 a.m.

SP: I don't know that he was that bad. But I am sure his mate wasn't happy. Best, Don Bauder

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tomjohnston Jan. 21, 2013 @ 8:06 a.m.

And exactly how long is it that you were married surfpuppy619???LOL

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SurfPuppy619 Jan. 21, 2013 @ 9:30 a.m.

If you could go 1 week with Surfpuppy you would be doing good!

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Don Bauder Jan. 21, 2013 @ 12:17 p.m.

SurfPup: Doing good like working for the Salvation Army or the Red Cross? Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Jan. 21, 2013 @ 12:16 p.m.

tomjohnston: Now you are putting SurfPup on the spot. Best, Don Bauder

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Twister Jan. 20, 2013 @ 10:19 p.m.

Something's wrong with the brain here, perhaps all along (congenital), perhaps drug-induced, perhaps a little of both. Steroids?

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SurfPuppy619 Jan. 20, 2013 @ 10:36 p.m.

Something's wrong with the brain here, perhaps all along (congenital), perhaps drug-induced, perhaps a little of both. Steroids?

No way is Leaf on the juice. Steroids only work on advanced athletes who have taken their natural potential a far as it will go. Leaf was allergic to the weight room, that is why Bobby Beathard went nuclear on Leaf.....He may have a genetic mental defect, based on his behaviour

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tomjohnston Jan. 20, 2013 @ 10:47 p.m.

Charlie sheen has talked publicly on many occasions about his steriod use during trainng for his role in Major League. He did them for 6 or 8 weeks and says he gained several mph on his "fastball". I'd hardly call Sheen an advanced athlete though.

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Don Bauder Jan. 21, 2013 @ 7:28 a.m.

tomjohnston: Just the other night I was talking to a retired psychiatrist. Among those he treated were Hollywood stars, athletic heros, politicians, etc. who were addicted to adulation, or at least addicted to being in the public eye. That explained their bizarre behavior in many cases -- particularly, the kind of behavior for which Hollywood is known. Best, Don Bauder

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tomjohnston Jan. 21, 2013 @ 7:53 a.m.

I'm not sure what the relevance of your comment is. I was pointing out to surfpuppy619 1 particular instance in which steroids did increase the athleticism of an individual who was not an advanced athlete, not making a judgement on Charlie Sheen.

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SurfPuppy619 Jan. 21, 2013 @ 9:10 a.m.

Well Sheen was actually a highly skilled baseball player at Santa Monica High, well known fact. Was he pro? No, but he was highly skilled and an advanced athlete.

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tomjohnston Jan. 21, 2013 @ 10:24 a.m.

surfpuppy619. His "exploits" at SaMoHi are well know, that's true. But it's all about context: Ken Rizzo of the reknowned Mickey Owen Baseball School recalling Sheen's four summers at the rural camp" There's no doubt he could have played in college. Maybe even at a lower level Division 1 school. He had baseball skills. But he wasn't going to be playing at Arizona State, or Stanford, or UCLA. "I remember sitting there with him and telling him that I thought it was a longshot that he could make the pros." Said Sheen himself "I used to go to this place in Missouri, called the Mickey Owen Baseball School. I saw an ad in The Sporting News or Baseball Digest when I was in high school. I went to get scouted. But I looked at the talent there and knew I couldn't do it for a living." Good HS athlete, yeah. But "advanced" athlete?? I scoff at the notion. Kind of like saying Philip Rivers is every bit as good as a HoF quarterback. LOL Just my opinion. Opinions vary

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SurfPuppy619 Jan. 21, 2013 @ 10:36 a.m.

My post just got errored out by the reader.

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Don Bauder Jan. 21, 2013 @ 12:20 p.m.

tomjohnston: Maybe your post made me think of Hollywood and the unstable people who inhabit it. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Jan. 21, 2013 @ 7:23 a.m.

SurfPup: I know there was lots of talk that Leaf wouldn't work as hard as he should. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Jan. 21, 2013 @ 7:20 a.m.

Twister: It's hard to psychoanalyze someone whom you don't know. We do know that the addiction problem has been with him for a number of years. Best, Don Bauder

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Twister Jan. 21, 2013 @ 2:03 p.m.

Not suggesting "psychoanalysis." Brain study, e.g. scans, etc. I presumed that you knew the difference.

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Don Bauder Jan. 21, 2013 @ 4:47 p.m.

Twister: I think everybody on the blog knows the difference between psychoanalysis and brain scans. Best, Don Bauder

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Duhbya Jan. 21, 2013 @ 9:13 a.m.

Had not seen this before: an excerpt from a 2011 when Leaf guest-hosted a sports talk show on XX1090 and interviewed Jay Posner, the U-T reporter he verbally accosted when he was with the Chargers.

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Don Bauder Jan. 21, 2013 @ 12:23 p.m.

Duhbya: I did see a u-tube on the incident itself in the Chargers locker room. As I recall, Leaf was shouting at the U-T reporter, and Junior Seau came over and pushed Leaf away. Best, Don Bauder

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Duhbya Jan. 22, 2013 @ 1:36 a.m.

Right, that was the one I was referring to re SP's post below. (i didn't view his link, assuming it was the one you and I have seen). Seau was definitely unique.

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SurfPuppy619 Jan. 21, 2013 @ 9:38 a.m.

Awesome clip Dubya. Leaf sounds very contrite in the clip- I am impressed by his composure and attitude, 180 flip from the earlier days.

Here is that Ryan Leaf OUTBURST at Jay Posner, sort of scary to see that intensity of anger from Leaf;

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oLD5WMCpYEs

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Duhbya Jan. 21, 2013 @ 10:52 a.m.

As was I, but a bit more surprised, actually.

Nice to see Junior step in and put an end to it.

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SurfPuppy619 Jan. 21, 2013 @ 11:27 a.m.

Yes, Junior stepped in, the clip left that portion off but other clips have it. I remember the outburst and Junior as if it were yesterday. I tell you though, after seeing that clip you posted, I feel bad about all the negative comments I have made about Leaf, as it appears his attitude has really changed. Everyone needs a chance at redemption, a new start. I hope Leaf can get his, find peace with whatever problems he is facing and have move forward. He could still be a great coach somewhere.....

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Don Bauder Jan. 22, 2013 @ 7:19 a.m.

SP: We all hope Leaf can straighten himself out by shaking the addiction, if that is possible. Best, Don Bauder

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Twister Jan. 24, 2013 @ 8:40 a.m.

It's POSSIBLE; it's just MISERABLE.

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Don Bauder Jan. 22, 2013 @ 7:15 a.m.

Duhbya: Junior Seau understood the symbiotic relationship between sports (which after all is entertainment) and the media. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Jan. 21, 2013 @ 12:25 p.m.

SP: Yes, scary -- and for the Chargers and their fans, a scary portent. Best, Don Bauder

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Twister Jan. 22, 2013 @ 11:35 p.m.

Re: "Twister: I think everybody on the blog knows the difference between psychoanalysis and brain scans. Best, Don Bauder"

Do I detect a testy note here? If so, I'm confused. I'm confused period. Here is what you posted:

"Twister: It's hard to psychoanalyze someone whom you don't know. We do know that the addiction problem has been with him for a number of years. Best, Don Bauder"

Here's what I had posted just before that:

"Something's wrong with the brain here, perhaps all along (congenital), perhaps drug-induced, perhaps a little of both. Steroids?"

All I was trying to suggest is that actual brain studies, rather than, or in addition to, psychoanalysis should perhaps be done. By implication, however, I was suggesting that a look at the brain (for a tumor, for example) might be useful.

I do not understand why any of those statements implied that I insulted the intelligence everyone on the blog discussion by implying that they didn't know the difference between psychoanalysis and a brain scan (brain studies as opposed to psychoanalysis).

If I need to apologize for something, I need to know what I am apologizing for.

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Don Bauder Jan. 23, 2013 @ 7:21 a.m.

Twister: I used the word "psychoanalyze" when your preceding post made no such reference. Mea maxima culpa. Best, Don Bauder

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Twister Jan. 24, 2013 @ 8:36 a.m.

Don, no hay de que. You must keep pretty busy responding and reading all these comments, and can't be expected to absorb everything perfectly.

However, back to this most important issue, the Seau family is suing NFL and the helmet manufacturer.

Guilty and maybe guilty.

Actually, the helmet's net effect is to increase the level of violence in the sport. The helmet makes it possible to hit harder; to use the head like a battering ram, a weapon.

This increases the "excitement" of the game for the candy-ass "spectators" who haven't the guts to actually play themselves or are nostalgic for the days when they played high-school football. At root, it's all about sex (isn't everything?) It goes back to combat to win the favors of the fair lady, so some way of showing fitness for breeding is hard-wired into the species. I know from experience how much my wife was stimulated when I have gone to battle for her. Let's don't take this away--we can't escape it anyway. Think about the excitement when in school when somebody yelled, "fight, fight, FIGHT!" Both girls and boys would gather 'round to watch the spectacle.

But that's different from spectator sports of today when, rather than fight for the fair ladies, men dress up in makeup to look fierce, and bellow a lot, but it's all impotent display. If I'm not playing, I'm not interested. Real wrestling is, for example, a real display of strength, strategy, and intelligence (to some degree), but how popular is that? Still, it fulfills our need for demonstrating fitness with minimal risk of serious injury.

We have become "full of sound and fury, signifying nothing."

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Don Bauder Jan. 24, 2013 @ 11:16 a.m.

Twister: Yours is a Freudian interpretation, and I am not arguing with it. But I cannot see how a self-respecting woman would look favorably on a corpulent, gaseous, shirtless man watching football on TV while munching on potato chips, covering the couch with crumbs and spilled beer. Actually, it's grounds for divorce, if not homicide. Best, Don Bauder

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Twister Jan. 24, 2013 @ 8:46 a.m.

Don, going back over the exchanges and re-reading my posts, I now see how I used poor wording and phrasing. The key statement that must have started the confusion was probably my statement "I presumed that you knew the difference."

Mea culpa. I should have been more careful.

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Don Bauder Jan. 24, 2013 @ 11:18 a.m.

Twister: No need for a mea culpa. This is a blog site, not a PhD dissertation committee. Best, Don Bauder

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