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Investigative reporter Connie Bruck has a long piece in the Jan. 16 New Yorker magazine profiling Phil Anschutz *(pictured), owner of Anschutz Entertainment Group (AEG), and Phil Leiweke, president.

Most of the article does not deal with AEG's plan for a pro football stadium in downtown Los Angeles, but there are some nuggets. AEG was "not only trying to get a share of a team at a discount, but...wanted a landlord-tenant relationship that, in its control of revenues, amounted to a kind of asset-stripping," writes Bruck.

She quotes an executive vice president of the National Football League saying, "It's unlikely the league or a team would approve this proposal." But the exec vice president presented a proposal that he thought might work, and believes both sides may be working on it. Generally, media other than the New Yorker have been saying lately that the downtown LA stadium proposal is in trouble, and so is the Roski proposal in the City of Industry.

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Comments

Visduh Jan. 10, 2012 @ 11:21 a.m.

So, neither group in LA can make a stadium plan work, yet here in SD, formerly-Porky Sanders is still making happy talk about a plan for a stadium downtown. Is this some sort of alternative universe where the usual laws of nature do not apply? If a stadium in LA cannot be built--and it needs one, given that it now has two aged structures, the Coliseum and the Rose Bowl--how can any sane person think it can be done in San Diego? (I just answered my own question.)

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Don Bauder Jan. 10, 2012 @ 2:28 p.m.

It seems to me I saw somebody in the mainstream media admit in a story today that the proposed Chargers stadium would cost $1 billion. The mainstreamers have been going along with the $700 million/$800 million figure the Chargers have been throwing out, which is both crazy and disingenuous, particularly if the field will be part of the convention center complex, with roof, etc.

One other important thing in that New Yorker article: apparently, Anschutz doesn't give a hoot for football. He does, of course, love money. Leiweke apparently talked him into the stadium and he agreed because of the profit potential. Everything considered, I believe San Diegans can conclude that the possibility of that downtown stadium is getting more and more remote, as is the City of Industry proposal by Roski. The Chargers will play in San Diego in 2012 because they have no place to go. That will probably be true in 2013, too, and maybe 2014. The Chargers are making a lot of money at Qualcomm, which is a nice stadium for football 10 times a year. It could last decades. Besides, with 80-inch flat screen TVs coming in, who wants to go to a stadium anyway? Best, Don Bauder

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Visduh Jan. 10, 2012 @ 4:16 p.m.

Hold on, podnuh. Nick Canepa said in yesterday's Light News that a new stadium is needed. Nick knows all, and that's that. Are you saying that Nick could be mistaken?

Then there's this failure by Spanos to make any changes in either the management or coaching of the team. It would appear as if he doesn't care what the fans (the rubes who buy the tickets) think. Yet, all the while, Spanos rakes in the bucks.

If he were to pay for some improvements and deferred maintenance on the current stadium, he could likely get an even sweeter deal from the city. Let's say $20 to $25 million worth would make that facility last another century.

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Don Bauder Jan. 10, 2012 @ 7:52 p.m.

The best option would be to have some people and institutions with a stake in the Q -- say, Qualcomm, which got naming rights for a ridiculous steal -- chip in for the improvements needed at the Q. (The major bitches seem to be that one visiting team didn't like the locker rooms -- poor dears -- and the press doesn't like the press box. Too damned bad. Truly heroic journalists go to Mexico and get caught in the crossfire of drug warfare, but the sportswriters need more comfort.) Best, Don Bauder

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Burwell Jan. 10, 2012 @ 8:50 p.m.

The sportswriters at the U-T appear to be putting in a lot of overtime with the knife and fork. Maybe Papa Doug should get rid of the candy and coke machines and put in a salad bar to help the poor bastards.

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Don Bauder Jan. 11, 2012 @ 7:51 a.m.

Yes, and who is picking up the tab for those sumptuous meals fattening the sportswriters? John Moores? Moorad? Spanos? Fabiani? Best, Don Bauder

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Twister Jan. 11, 2012 @ 8:50 a.m.

A billion here, a billion there; pretty soon you're talking about REAL money. Another bubble being pumped up with hot air--sucked directly out of our orifices . . .

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Don Bauder Jan. 11, 2012 @ 6:29 p.m.

In considering the intelligence of the current mayor and some of the mayoral candidates, one must realize that all the money they want to shell out for the convention center in a huge national glut, and for a football stadium for a billionaire family which would put in little money, means more potholes, more chopping of services such as libraries and rec centers, more rundown infrastructure and the like. Best, Don Bauder

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Twister Jan. 11, 2012 @ 8:53 a.m.

An' good ole Wikipedia:

"Bread and Circuses" (or bread and games) (from Latin: panem et circenses) is a metaphor for a superficial means of appeasement. It was the basic Roman formula for the well-being of the population, and hence a political strategy unto itself[citation needed]. In the case of politics, the phrase is used to describe the creation of public approval, not through exemplary or excellent public service or public policy, but through diversion, distraction, and/or the mere satisfaction of the immediate, shallow requirements of a populace.[1][2][3] The phrase also implies the erosion or ignorance of civic duty amongst the concerns of the common man (l'homme moyen sensuel). In modern usage, the phrase has also become an adjective to describe a populace that no longer values civic virtues and the public life. Or as famous American author Robert Heinlein said, "Once the monkeys learn they can vote themselves bananas, they'll never climb another tree." To many across the political spectrum, left and right, it connotes a supposed triviality and frivolity that characterized the Roman Republic prior to its decline into the autocratic monarchy characteristic of the later Roman Empire's transformation about 44 BCE.

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Don Bauder Jan. 11, 2012 @ 6:30 p.m.

Excellent definition of bread and circuses. That's exactly how the Romans meant the reference, and it's exactly what purported leaders would like to happen in San Diego. Best, Don Bauder

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Psycholizard Jan. 11, 2012 @ 2:28 p.m.

The present Stadium is a masterpiece of design, in the best location, the proposed replacement will very likely be inferior, at a huge price.

The scheme involves plundering the City;s real estate assets, certainly the Stadium Mission Valley property, probably more. The City has nothing else to steal.

The Chargers like the present Stadium location so much, they intend to keep the land for themselves.

SAVE OUR STADIUM,

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Don Bauder Jan. 11, 2012 @ 6:32 p.m.

Correct. The Q is a good stadium. The Chargers don't need a new one, particularly with San Diego broke. Best, Don Bauder

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Ponzi Jan. 11, 2012 @ 8:13 p.m.

Of all the years I have lived in San Diego, one of my favorite things was enjoying a fire on the beach. One of the things that infuriates me the most about the a-hole Mayor Sanders is his pursuit of a new stadium while he simultaneously declares the city cannot afford the beach fire pits.

Tourists dream of things like sitting on a beach at a fire. Locals loved being able to go to the beach and have a fire with friends and family.

This mayor is the most disgusting, simpleton, inarticulate bozo that has ever disgraced the mayor’s office. I really feel he is worse than Susan Golding, Dick Murphy and all of the other buffoons combined.

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Don Bauder Jan. 12, 2012 @ 10:11 a.m.

Just look at what Mayor Sanders said last night and ask yourself if he has all his marbles. He is pathetically delusional. How can he claim the San Diego economy will snap back when the world economy is on the brink and California remains even more broke than San Diego? How long has he been saying he will solve the financial problems? How long has he been claiming that he has made all these jobs reductions? Has anybody told him about the huge glut of convention space in the U.S.? Where is the money going to come from for a new stadium? (One thing is certain: not much will come from his pals in the billionaire Spanos family.) Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Jan. 13, 2012 @ 10:09 p.m.

After Sanders's speech, Jim Mills, former president pro tem of the California State Senate, said, "He [Sanders] is losing his mind or has lost his mind. The City is broke, the streets are not being maintained." Infrastructure generally is a mess; maintenance lags badly. "He doesn't care about financial problems after he is gone. They will be problems of another mayor. This is a major problem with term limits." Best, Don Bauder

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Burwell Jan. 14, 2012 @ 1:22 p.m.

Sanders is not the only one who has gone daft. Malin Burntham wants to erect a 500 foot sculpture of Pegasus the flying horse on the tip of Navy Pier.

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Don Bauder Jan. 14, 2012 @ 3:56 p.m.

And they want to do all this with redevelopment money, I suppose; they expect to have the legislature overthrow the supreme court ruling so the redevelopment agency can once again dole out money stolen from schools, counties and special districts. Best, Don Bauder

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Twister Jan. 14, 2012 @ 10:39 p.m.

What's going on with this site? I use the "50 blog entries" and "50 Story entries" buttons to expedite my review of the latest action. This one has only five blog entries. There were similar problems with both blogs and stories, but it seems to be popping up again. Is the "Reader" trying to reduce site usage or is there a glitch they haven't been able to fix?

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Don Bauder Jan. 15, 2012 @ noon

Unfortunately, your problem is out of my area of responsibility. Suggest you explain your problem to systems@sdreader.com. I can't imagine we want to reduce site usage. Best, Don Bauder

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