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A dishonest bookkeeper was sent to prison for 5 years and 8 months for stealing more than a million dollars from her employer. Her sentencing was last month. Five days ago a judge ordered the felon to pay $77,224 to the California Franchise Tax Board.

Sixty-four-year old Jennifer Lyndi Davey had already been ordered to pay restitution of $1,487,029.63 to her former employer, William Beckman. The 4 foot 10 inch thief admitted taking money from her employer over a six-year period, in the plea deal she admitted two counts of fraud so that more than 60 other felony counts were dropped.

Davey put in writing that she “unlawfully took and stole money from Beckman Properties which was valued in excess of $500,000 by unlawfully completing and passing false or altered checks.” Beckman Properties had hired Davey in 2000.

Prosecutor Anna Winn originally charged Davey with taking almost $1.5 million from the Solana Beach company, which fired Davey in October 2007 when they reportedly found her bookkeeping skills “not satisfactory.” The new officer manager soon uncovered the fraud, investigators said.

Davey has been in custody since her arrest in February of 2012, and the court noted she had 346 days “credits” when she was sentenced.

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Comments

dwbat Aug. 28, 2012 @ 8:33 p.m.

What's amazing is how the company could not know it had more than $1.4 million stolen. Have they ever heard of auditing the books by a CPA, at least every year? That audit would have caught the embezzling long ago. Sounds like poor management.

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Visduh Aug. 28, 2012 @ 8:52 p.m.

Whenever a case like this one comes along, I wonder how the ownership or management could have not known that something was very wrong. A few of these cases proved that the businesses were ultra-profitable, and that allowed the embezzler to keep the owners in the dark, pay the bills, pay the taxes, pay the rent, and still abscond with hundreds of thousands or millions of bucks. As far as having an annual audit by a CPA, these businesses think they are too small to need one, and that one might be costly. They were bigger than they thought, profitwise, and no audit would have cost them what the embezzler cost them.

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