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Scott Barnett, a board member for San Diego Unified School District, is asking 15,000 district teachers and other staff to take one for the team by not taking raises. Doing so, says Barnett, will allow more teachers to return to school next year.

"The issue is not whether our teachers and other employees deserve raises, I believe they do,” stated Barnett. "But the plain fact is we can't afford raises."

San Diego Unified is expected to dole out $88.5 million in raises in the next three years. This year employee raises amounted to $17 million.

Barnett says that employee unions refuse to sit down at the negotiating table, despite the hundreds of jobs on the line.

"Our school board unanimously asked our employee unions to work in partnership with us to find ways to save jobs. But sadly, every union except our school police refused to even discuss options. I don't understand how the leaders who represent our employees can justify not even talking about ways to save jobs. Everything must be on the table," added Barnett.

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Comments

MURPHYJUNK May 27, 2011 @ 8:10 a.m.

more likely the recycled pink slip threat is not working these days

hard to win at bluffing if they play the same loosing hand every time

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CallieCat May 27, 2011 @ 8:08 p.m.

the more I read and learn about Mr. Barnett, the less I trust of him. He appears most ambitious. He postures and seems to like the sound of his own voice. Speak with reason and vision for once, we're all tired of listening to the drum beat of fear. Those days are behind us.

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SurfPuppy619 May 29, 2011 @ 3:24 p.m.

Barnett says that employee unions refuse to sit down at the negotiating table, despite the hundreds of jobs on the line.

======================= if they do not negotiate you have two choices;

1) start firing teachers

2) impose a freeze wage on the next contract-at least 3-5 years.

The "average" CA teacher is comping $81 an hour, some are comping $150 an hour-that is plenty of money for the job they do, whihc has bullet proof job security and protections from being fired for incompetence or anything else.

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Visduh June 1, 2011 @ 7:36 a.m.

One claim often made during negotiations or the run-up to negotiations is the claim that the other side "refuses to sit down at the negotiating table." In and of itself, that claim means little. The usual tale is more one of one side proclaiming a stance that doesn't represent a real proposal, the other side waiting for something concrete, and finally some negotiation after a time. Now, as to whether the union may finally agree to some or all raise deferrals "to save jobs' that school district has played fast and loose with the truth for decades, and there's no trust left. One batch of board members is replaced with another batch, they hire and fire a series of carpetbagger superintendents, and the beat goes on. If anything is normal on Normal Street, it is that the dysfunctional school district is rife with distrust, ill will, and disrespect.

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Teach03 June 2, 2011 @ 7:20 a.m.

Surfpuppy619-

I am a CA teacher with my BA, MA, administrative degree, math specialist certificate, and GATE certified. I have over 4 years of post graduate work in education. Anyone in any other industry with this much education makes well over the average teacher salary. You mention numbers are 80-150 dollars an hour. I have been teaching for almost 8 years and I do not make anything near that. I wish I did but it is not happening. In fact, I have taken pay cuts and used more of my own money to support my students as there have been site cuts as well.

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SurfPuppy619 June 2, 2011 @ 2:07 p.m.

I have over 4 years of post graduate work in education. ================ A graduate degree IN education is not a serious graduate education. Every college in America offers a cream puff MA in education, usually tied to the teaching certificate, and they are not difficult to get into nor to pass. Go try to get into a law school and see how easy it is when 250K people take the LSAT for 30K open slots. An MA in Education is not nMS in Astro-Physics.

. Anyone in any other industry with this much education makes well over the average teacher salary. ================ 100% false. Teachers are comped FAR MORE than private sector industries. A private sector school teacher is comped 65%-75% LESS than a public school teacher. Heck, there is an article on this webite just 2 days old about a law graduate (an education light years harder than a teacher education) who cannot find work as an attlrneyh after being out of LS for 3 full years. So your claim that you don't make as much money as others in the private sector is completely bogus. . http://www.manhattan-institute.org/html/cr_50.htm . .

You mention numbers are 80-150 dollars an hour. I have been teaching for almost 8 years and I do not make anything near that.

I did not say you "made" that. I stated the AVERAGE COMPENSATION, not salary but total compensation, for a CA state teacher. It is $68K in cash and another $40K in benefits, for working a part time 37 week work per year job, and part time work week of just 36 contracted hours. That is in the top 2-3% in the nation in hourly comp.

. In fact, I have taken pay cuts and used more of my own money to support my students as there have been site cuts as well. ================= I am not aware of ANY district in the state that have given PAY CUTS. A Furlough is NOT a pay cut, it is a furlough day, you don't work.

I am not going to even mention the bullet proof job security a teacher has, which is a value equal to at least 30% of the base salary.

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Visduh June 2, 2011 @ 8:48 p.m.

While I agree with SurfPup about the rigor of those education degrees, there's more to the picture than he portrays. The totally worthless degree is the Ed.D., the infamous "Ed Doc" that allows various educrats to run around calling themselves "Doctor". And you can bet that as soon as one gets the degree, the honorific is never forgotten. The sad part of it all is among the administrators I've seen, those with those doctorates are the weakest, the most detached, the least practical, and the all round phoniest ones. It is almost as if the more formal training they get, the more useless they get. Recently a local university announced an Ed Doc program for people working as administrators in local schools. They can earn one of those pseudo-doctorates in a mere three years while working full time. Please name any other field where a doctorate can be earned with so little time and attention. It's a scandal, and the degree is of no value to society; it is just a career ticket punch for refugees from classroom teaching.

That said, the pay for starting teachers in California runs somewhere around $1000 a week for the weeks worked, or $200 a day. That's not equivalent to $80-150 an hour. The fringes are good, but to claim they either cost or are worth $40,000 a year is nonsense. That would imply that a new teacher is getting as much in fringes as in raw pay. Nope, nope. And I'd like to know where the $68K a year for the average CA teacher came from. Around here, it takes 15 to 20 years to hit that much on the pay scales, and in poorer and more rural areas, even longer.

Teachers are well paid now, but they aren't getting rich, they aren't pulling down $150 an hour in pay and benefits, and to suggest most of them are on the gravy train is irresponsible.

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