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This morning the California Geological Survey released a new map of potential landslide areas across the state. According to an accompanying news release, about 57,000 so-called deep landslides are shown on the map, and more can be expected due to recent heavy rains.

A little over a year ago, our Joe Deegan wrote about the infamous Mount Soledad landslide and its historic financial and political repercussions here:

The map is here:

http://www.conservation.ca.gov/cgs/information/publications/ms/Documents/MS58.pdf

The latest map isn't detailed enough to give specific street addresses, but instead is meant to provide an "overview of where landslides are more likely to occur to emergency planners, those who own or operate infrastructure facilities, and the public at large."

"The map uses detailed information on the location of past landslides, the location and relative strength of rock units, and steepness of slope in a methodology developed by Wilson and Keefer (1985). The result shows the distribution of one very important component of landslide hazard.

"The map does not include information on landslide triggering events, such as rainstorms or earthquake shaking, nor does it address susceptibility to shallow landslides such as debris flows."

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