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According to the New York Times today (April 25), Minnesota federal judge Susan Richard Nelson granted players an injunction to lift the National Football League lockout by the owners. In Brady (quarterback Tom Brady) vs. NFL, the judge denied the owners a stay. The league is expected to ask her for a stay tomorrow; if it isn't granted, they will go to the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals, which is considered business-friendly. If neither court grants the stay, the NFL will have to allow players to return to work and free agency would be re-established. If either court grants a stay, the league will remain dormant while the owners appeal the injunction. If the appeals court knocks down Nelson's injunction, the lockout will continue "and players will have lost much of their leverage," says the Times. Bottom line: the 2011 season is still no sure thing. The battle is over money: the billionaire owners want a bigger slice of income flows, and millionaire players are against the idea.

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Comments

MURPHYJUNK April 26, 2011 @ 8:01 a.m.

its a shame our tax money is used to settle these phoney disputes

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Don Bauder April 26, 2011 @ 11:10 a.m.

It's an even bigger shame -- a complete disgrace-- that tax money is used to subsidize billionaire team owners' ballparks and stadiums. Best, Don Bauder

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SurfPuppy619 April 27, 2011 @ 6:41 p.m.

The OWNERS are wrecking all of professional sports.

The Green Bay Packers do not have the community problems all the other teams have, and they don't for a reason, the team is owned by the local community and have sold out every home game for 30+ years, in the worst climate and most antiquated stadium in Pro Sports.

So don't try to lay that BS on me that new state of the art stadiums, built for mega corps and millionaires, are need to "stay competitive". Baloney.

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Don Bauder April 27, 2011 @ 11:04 p.m.

The Packers' stadium, Lambeau Field, was renovated in 2003 and is now in relatively good shape. Still, it's cold up there in the tundra. Best, Don Bauder

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tomjohnston April 28, 2011 @ 9:40 a.m.

Actually, I think what makes the Packers different and the reason they don't have the "community problems" all the other teams have is because there is nothing for people to argue about. The Packers are owned by Green Bay Packers, Inc., which is controlled by about 100k share holders. Green Bay Packers, Inc. is a non profit. The shares produce no financial gain for stockholders because all profits the team makes go to the American Legion. No money to argue about, no problems. GBP Inc does not own Lambeau Field though. It's owned by the city and the county stadium district. There was also some expansion/renovation done in the '90's. But when they did that $300 million renovation, guess who paid for it. I'll give you a hint. It wasn't the Packers. Oh, they did kick in a few million, but almost all of it was paid for by the taxpayers in the form of the tried and true sales tax increase. I had to look this up to be accurate, the tax increased passed by a narrow 53-47 margin. Apparently not everyone is that enamored by the Packers.
Not long after last season was over, I read that there is also going to be a $20 million upgrade to the scoreboard and sound system with a couple of hi-def scoreboards. I did read something I hadn't hard before.Apparently a few years ago the team the city and the county agreed to sell the naming rights to Lambeau for $100 million in order to help retire the debt earlier. I guess no one has taken them up on their offer; it's still called Lambeau.

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Don Bauder April 28, 2011 @ 10:20 a.m.

Harley-Davidson is a beloved Wisconsin name. So is Miller Beer (even though it is owned by an out-of-state firm.) You would think somebody would buy naming rights. And yes, you are right: when Green Bay citizens voted on the tax increase for the stadium rehab, there was a lot of opposition, and the vote was closer than anybody had imagined. Best, Don Bauder

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SurfPuppy619 April 28, 2011 @ 4:20 p.m.

almost all of it was paid for by the taxpayers in the form of the tried and true sales tax increase.

Wow, that was a major let down.....just deflated my respect for Green Bay. Sales tax, yuck.

The sales tax is the most regressive tax there is, and very few people who pay it are going to be able to get a benefit out of it in the way of seeing a game.

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Don Bauder April 28, 2011 @ 7:20 p.m.

The sales tax is indeed a very regressive tax. Why do you think Mayor Sanders wanted to impose one? He was protecting his friends in the upper crust. Best, Don Bauder

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SurfPuppy619 April 28, 2011 @ 4:23 p.m.

I also am VERY surpised the local community did a $300 million rehah/renovation. Shocking really. That is some serious coin. Not that far behind what the Chargers claimed they could build a NEW stadium for really.

I am so tied of this corporate welfare for the billionaires-when are the numbskulls going to wake up and smell the coffee, these owners are BILLIONAIRES (or extremely wealthy for the most part), why are the little guys paying their freight??

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Don Bauder April 28, 2011 @ 7:22 p.m.

The new stadium the Chargers are proposing would cost the city taxpayers $600 million at the very least. Realistically, $700 million to more than $800 is more like it. Best, Don Bauder

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MURPHYJUNK April 29, 2011 @ 7:50 a.m.

and how much in the long run for "unfilled seats"?

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Don Bauder April 29, 2011 @ 7:52 a.m.

Professional wrestling is not a ball sport. However, it's scripted. (But so are parts of some ball games, too, it seems.) Best, Don Bauder

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MURPHYJUNK April 30, 2011 @ 7:28 a.m.

yes, too much money being thrown around not to be corrupt and fake

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Don Bauder April 30, 2011 @ 8:02 a.m.

I used to know the number of how much money is gambled, legally and illegally, on sports each year. I don't know an up-to-date number. The number I once knew was so high I wondered how games could NOT be fixed. Best, Don Bauder

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