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With half the vote counted, the no vote on Proposition D, the proposal to raise the sales tax, was 62.33% last night (Nov. 2). The yes vote was 37.67%. Clearly, San Diegans are having nothing of the proposal. Now pundits will guess why the vote was so decisive. Was it the national Republican sweep? A vote against a Chargers subsidy? Resentment against the mayor's late-night, secret deal to help CCDC finance a Chargers stadium? A dislike of taxes in a deep recession? Fear that the increased tax will dent retail sales, already down more in the recession since the Great Depression of the 1930s? Or San Diego's usual tax revulsion?

Councilmember Carl DeMaio says he will come out with a "Roadmap to Recovery" Friday morning. He says the plan will balance with 2012 budget without cuts to police and fire services. The plan will restructure the pension system, says DeMaio.

Former City Attorney Mike Aguirre has come out with specific plans, focusing particularly on excessive pensions. Driving the $7.2 billion pension debt are the Deferred Retirement Option Plan (DROP), the double-dipping taxpayer ripoff; free pension credits, and retroactive benefits. Aguirre would end DROP, eliminate free pension benefits and remove retroactive benefits. He believes citizens should have a right to vote on the pension debt lawsuit that he pushed when in office, and the City should use the bankruptcy court's power to adjust debt.

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Comments

a2zresource Nov. 3, 2010 @ 3:08 a.m.

RE "Now pundits will guess why the vote was so decisive. Was it the national Republican sweep? A vote against a Chargers subsidy? Resentment against the mayor's late-night, secret deal to help CCDC finance a Chargers stadium? A dislike of taxes in a deep recession? Fear that the increased tax will dent retail sales, already down more in the recession since the Great Depression of the 1930s? Or San Diego's usual tax revulsion?":

This gadfly pundit sez: How about all of the above, and then some?

Don't forget the recent Reader revelation that unionized city workers are now suspected of illegally converting unused city property into gifts and other prizes as semi-official payouts paid for with salvaged city construction materials... all sanctioned by their immediate supervisors and most likely never routinely disclosed by those supervisors to city auditors.

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a2zresource Nov. 3, 2010 @ 3:20 a.m.

I expect that one relatively low cost alternative is to train line city employees to manage trained volunteers in their respective job areas of operations for the city.

Regardless of current city employee contracts, expecting all city employees to serve as managers of numerous volunteers is what the citizens must expect now of city government, or we must admit that city workers are contributing to to fiscal crisis conditions while preventing a proper comprehensive emergency management response to a city-managed high-risk hazard that threatens the public's well being with respect to our lives, liberty and property.

This is now a discussion about a failure of process hazard leading to an increased risk of lawlessness in San Diego county. An experienced governor who is aware of his militia powers in times and places of lawlessness may have to come down and put things in order.

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Anon92107 Nov. 3, 2010 @ 4:02 a.m.

Sanders is still San Diego Public Safety Threat #1.

U-T Puppet-Mayor Sanders will continue his deadly cutbacks to public safety, continue to sacrifice police and fire resources and clean water to pay off his campaign contributors and fund his personal fortune.

Nothing changes U-T San Diego, corruption still rules regardless of their continuing destruction of quality of life in San Diego.

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Don Bauder Nov. 3, 2010 @ 7:25 a.m.

Response to post #1: Yes, that Reader revelation would be another reason, along with resentment of the mayor's scare tactics at the so-called forums. Perhaps the biggest factor is that the citizenry simply does not trust San Diego government. And shouldn't. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 3, 2010 @ 7:31 a.m.

Response to post #2: Using volunteers intelligently is certainly one alternative that has to be studied. But there is one overwhelming factor: fat, fat, fat pensions. San Diego simply can't make modest changes, such as taking DROP away from new employees. Changes to existing contracts must be made, even if they have to be made in bankruptcy court, and the decision will end up at the Supreme Court. Assistant city attorneys shouldn't be retiring at $300,000 a year. Safety employees shouldn't be retiring at ages 50 and 55 with huge pensions. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 3, 2010 @ 7:33 a.m.

Response to post #3: As I wrote earlier, it is time to storm the Bastille -- figuratively, of course. To start, drown them in hate mail. Best, Don Bauder

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Ponzi Nov. 3, 2010 @ 7:40 a.m.

The people have spoken. They are not fooled by scare tactics. Good parents don’t reward children by paying allowance before the chores are accomplished.

People who say “the pensions can never be changed, every court has ruled that… so far.” They will be witnessing a trend against that line of thought as the tsunami of pension deficits across the nation flood the bankruptcy courts. San Diego could very well be one of the first. The only option is bargaining with the “creditors,” which are basically what the pensions are, promises - and we know promises can be broken.

Jerry Sanders wanted to be a leader, the mayor, now he’s going to have to stop daydreaming about unaffordable development schemes, and actually work on a solution.

This tax defeat was a clear message to, and about, Jerry Sanders. The people do not trust him any longer.

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a2zresource Nov. 3, 2010 @ 9 a.m.

RE "Using volunteers intelligently is certainly one alternative that has to be studied. But there is one overwhelming factor: fat, fat, fat pensions. San Diego simply can't make modest changes, such as taking DROP away from new employees. Changes to existing contracts must be made, even if they have to be made in bankruptcy court, and the decision will end up at the Supreme Court. Assistant city attorneys shouldn't be retiring at $300,000 a year. Safety employees shouldn't be retiring at ages 50 and 55 with huge pension":

Certainly even the massive usage of city-managed volunteers cannot do anything about our even more massive pension and municipal retiree health care liabilities. At the same time, SOMEBODY at City Hall needs to be planning for the contingency of just flat out running out of cash flow to keep city workers paid, much less paying for their early retirement.

If the city is not planning on bankruptcy or some other measure to insure that there are funds to maintain a minimal level of public services (probably less than what we've enjoyed up to now), then there is an increasing risk of failed city processes and lawlessness in San Diego county.

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HonestGovernment Nov. 3, 2010 @ 9:07 a.m.

7, "Jerry Sanders wanted to be a leader, the mayor"

Not really. His campaign theme was "to run the city like a business." And he has done that...a really bad business (a few models come to mind).

The people were never to be his shareholders. Many people knew that, but the U-T and VoSD championed Sanders on, never asking him about his phony "CEO" resume, created by Tom Stickel and other downtown/Coronado/North County bankers and wheeler dealers.

In any normal town Sanders would have been ripped to shreds over his phony CEO claim. For god's sake, the company he claimed to oversee was named "Virtual Capital." That was too good to be true. But he was the Republican's and businessmen's boy, and so here we are now....

with a virtual mayor and a virtual government.

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MsGrant Nov. 3, 2010 @ 9:14 a.m.

Volunteers?? Last I checked they work for me, not vice-versa. And they do not do it for free. I am sure A2Z was being facitious. Gimme-Government needs to stop.

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SurfPuppy619 Nov. 3, 2010 @ 9:15 a.m.

Here it my plan, I posted it in anbother thread, to fix the pension shortfall and protect it moving forward;

1) highest paid employees take 25% salary cut, and as the salary goes down progressively lower the % of the salary cut, w/no one under $50K taking a cut. Cap that salary for a minimum of 5 years, or until DB pension fund is at a 120% funded level, which ever comes first.

All that money saved from the pay cut is paid, IN FULL, right into the pension DB fund to shore it up.

All new hires go into a DB/DC hybrid pension plan-1%@40 DB w/6% matching DC from both employee and muni; or

A 10% employee DC contribution combined with 25% City/muni DC contribution (35% DC overall, might/might not raise it 5% for public safety).

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SurfPuppy619 Nov. 3, 2010 @ 9:18 a.m.

Sanders is still San Diego Public Safety Threat #1.

By Anon92107

This tax defeat was a clear message to, and about, Jerry Sanders. The people do not trust him any longer.

By Ponzi

BOTH comments on the money, Sanders has to go.

He is not the answer to this Cities problems. He has NO solutions besides his half baked tax schemes that are nothing more than corporate welfare and bandaid approaches to the pension tsunami coming down the turn................

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SurfPuppy619 Nov. 3, 2010 @ 9:22 a.m.

People who say “the pensions can never be changed, every court has ruled that… so far.” They will be witnessing a trend against that line of thought as the tsunami of pension deficits across the nation flood the bankruptcy courts. San Diego could very well be one of the first.

Prichard Alabama shed their pensions in BK court, so it can be done, and it will be done on a massive scale for muni's across this country in the coming years.

I am predicting CA and NY will be asking the Feds to bail them out-much like the TARP money did the last 2 years. I sincerely hope that does not happen. It is morally and ethically wrong, and could be a political nightmare for Obama, but it is certainly possible after what the Feds did with GM and the UAW union.

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MURPHYJUNK Nov. 3, 2010 @ 9:43 a.m.

no doubt they already have an alternate plan in the works to screw the tax payers

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Founder Nov. 3, 2010 @ 9:56 a.m.

  • D as in Defeated -*

Reply to All Prop D did Fall

Now is a great time Too rejoice in Rhyme

I dreamed last night of the Prop D bout Now I'm glad to find it was a rout

Just like all of us taxpayers, our City Leaders now have to work Its time to declare Bankruptcy and cut the Pension fat with a dirk

Carl DeMaio and Aguirre will now both probably led the way We all need to consider everything they and others have to say

Our Mayor must now listen to US instead of just his Wealthy friends If he accepts the will of the people it's now time to make amends

Let's hope he is strong enough to stop selling his soul By doing secret deals like the New Stadium Guacamole Bowl

Now is the time to spend less time playing golf with his putter and get to work pulling San Diego out of the gutter

All City and Redevelopment money needs to help US get out of BIG debt If we consider all options not just promote for Pensions we can win this bet

Let's now work together to get rid of Pity We all only want what's best for our Great City

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Founder Nov. 3, 2010 @ 10:08 a.m.

I think the next big "TE$T" will be this:

Now that Prop D failed, how will all those that promoted "Doom & Gloom" not look foolish or worse, when there are no Massive layoffs!

If our Leaders cut back on Massive Redevelopment Projects and redirect that money toward City Wide Public works projects instead of Wealthy Developer "Fluff" we can get out of the mess we are in!

Like all those Americans that lost big hunks of their retirements, those on the City Pension Luxury Train will also have to accept that our City is Broke and they too must accept less than they had planned, because our Leaders have promised more than they had to give!

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SurfPuppy619 Nov. 3, 2010 @ 10:51 a.m.

I like Founder's rhyme!!!

I predicted Prop D would fail by a 2-1 margin, and it was very close to a 2-1 failure. When an issue fails by 2-1, then it was a very bad issue to be placed on the ballot.

If you take out the public employees who had a vested interest in gettign D passed, it would have most likely failed by 3-1.

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Anon92107 Nov. 3, 2010 @ 11:07 a.m.

Response to post #6: Don, I thought that was what the "Reader" is for, to make the right things happen like motivating "Reader" readers to join a protest movement to save public safety from destruction by the U-T culture of corruption, like:

RECALL "LARCENY" SANDERS

(unless that won't fit on a bumper sticker provided by the "Reader" and you have to think of another catchy campaign slogan).

Besides, corrupt politicians and their owners never read anything that they don't agree with anyway so hate mail never works on their kind, especially when they are spending all their time committing larceny.

The "Reader" alone could fill every issue exposing their acts of larceny, which you come pretty close to doing already.

However, we have to be most aware of U-T class voters like those that reelected "Duke II" Bilbray who are really out to overthrow Democracy altogether, so the problem is much worse than ending the U-T era of City Hall larceny alone.

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Don Bauder Nov. 3, 2010 @ 11:29 a.m.

Response to post #7: Yes, the defenders of outrageous public pensions claim that they are locked into the law. But slavery was once locked into the law, too. Laws can be changed. Best, Don Bauder

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BradleyFikes Nov. 3, 2010 @ 11:41 a.m.

I am predicting CA and NY will be asking the Feds to bail them out-much like the TARP money did the last 2 years.<<

The new GOP House is extremely unlikely to agree to such bailouts.

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Don Bauder Nov. 3, 2010 @ 11:48 a.m.

Response to post #8: You are right, but is anybody at City Hall smart enough or courageous enough to think about what will happen when the city runs out of money? Let's face it: San Diego has ALREADY run out of money. Why do you think potholes are everywhere, infrastructure and maintenance are a disgrace, fire and police service are being cut back, ad nauseam? Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 3, 2010 @ 11:50 a.m.

Response to post #9: Sanders has not been running San Diego like a business. He has been running it FOR the top people in the business community. There is a big difference. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 3, 2010 @ 11:52 a.m.

Response to post #10: Gimme-government: good explanation. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 3, 2010 @ 11:54 a.m.

Response to post #11: To achieve the 25% pay cut, the city should enter bargaining asking for a 40% cut. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 3, 2010 @ 11:57 a.m.

Response to post #12: Agreed, but just try to get him out of office. Is your wallet open, and do you have deep pockets? Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 3, 2010 @ 11:58 a.m.

Response to post #13: That's a pretty safe prediction: the federal government will be bailing out certain states. Possibly cities, too. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 3, 2010 @ noon

Response to post #14: Of course there is an alternate plan to screw taxpayers. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 3, 2010 @ 12:01 p.m.

Response to post #15: You can cut the pension fat with a dirk but you can't cut it with a dork wielding the dirk. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 3, 2010 @ 12:03 p.m.

Response to post #16: Yes, but although Prop. D failed, the developers still run the city. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 3, 2010 @ 12:06 p.m.

Response to post #17: Hmm. Without the public employees' vote it would have lost 3-1? I'll have to do some noodling on that one. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 3, 2010 @ 12:10 p.m.

Response to post #18: We are on the lookout for larceny. San Diego is a good place to go hunting for thieves. Best, Don Bauder

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SurfPuppy619 Nov. 3, 2010 @ 12:26 p.m.

You can cut the pension fat with a dirk but you can't cut it with a dork wielding the dirk.

CLASSIC!!

.

I am predicting CA and NY will be asking the Feds to bail them out-much like the TARP money did the last 2 years.<<

The new GOP House is extremely unlikely to agree to such bailouts.

Oh, I am hoping so much that you are right. It would be a terrible mistake if the Feds bailed out any state/s. Terrible.

These bailouts (so far just for the connected few) need to end, they are wiping out what is left of our the middle class.

Let's hope someone, ANYONE in the Congress can put our finances in order and stop running trillion dollar + deficits. If repugs do it, great, if dems do it, great. Don't care who, what or how it gets accomplished, but we need fiscal responsibility before we all end up on the street.

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historymatters Nov. 3, 2010 @ 12:51 p.m.

And Sanders was so smug last night on the news about it saying "I just really respect what the voters want".....hmmmm"respect the voters" lets see that youtube clip of you again from Pat Flannery where a citizen is trying to ask you a question rather than having you read a pre-censored question from the crowd.....he articulates the majority view and concerns about Prop D and you very rudely tell him again and again he should "just leave".

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Anon92107 Nov. 3, 2010 @ 1:19 p.m.

Response to post #31:

Actually, we must all be "on the lookout for larceny" against San Diego taxpayers because it is far worse than just City Hall.

While doing some research on another corruption issue I ran across some investigative reports by Peter Byrne of Bohemiam.com (a Bay Area weekly similar to the "Reader"):

"Senator Feinstein's Iraq Conflict

As a member of the Military Construction Appropriations subcommittee, Sen. Feinstein voted for appropriations worth billions to her husband's firms ---" http://www.bohemian.com/bohemian/08.08.07/byrne-0732.html

As you say "San Diego is a good place to go hunting for thieves." But the more we investigate San Diego thieves, the more thieves we find that also have an unacceptable impact on San Diego taxpayers at the state and federal levels, and it's not just republicans.

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Founder Nov. 3, 2010 @ 1:30 p.m.

Reply #34 It is like that famous comedy line, "They're Everywhere, They're Everywhere" But it's not funny!

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a2zresource Nov. 3, 2010 @ 5:05 p.m.

RE "Volunteers?? Last I checked they work for me, not vice-versa. And they do not do it for free. I am sure A2Z was being facitious":

I apologize for appearing to be clowning around, but I am absolutely serious about using city-managed volunteers to get things done in this town.

I see things getting much worse than they are now, when we will either have to mitigate crappy city-owned things near us by ourselves (while hoping to have access to a city crew) or just go with the flow, in much the same way that we deal with the exploding overhead utility equipment that causes wildfires every so often.

Speaking of wildfires, residents of Alpine, Ramona and a few other choice communities, remembering the evacuations of 2003, were told to evacuate in 2007, gave a one finger salute, and stayed behind to save their own homes while saving a few of their neighbors' homes for good measure. THESE PEOPLE VOLUNTEERED BECAUSE TO NOT DO SO MEANT THE END OF DREAMS... with an effect like a very hot no-paperwork involuntary foreclosure from SDG&E/Sempra Energy.

City workers need to be prepared to be volunteer coordinators of local residents, or they will see the facilities they work at being closed down due to our city-wide budget shortages. That's just the way it's going to be, and the ones who haven't been clever enough to get people in the surrounding communities to at least be prepared for volunteering can experience the simple pleasures of being unemployed like the rest of us non-municipal types.

I haven't been posting those FEMA EMI certification links for my own health. I already HAVE that certification from the Department of Homeland Security, National Fire Academy and the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the same kind of certification that a number of city workers were found to be cheating on a few years back.

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Founder Nov. 3, 2010 @ 5:56 p.m.

Adding to #36 I have been saying this for a long time now; I used to live in Maryland and most of the Fire Fighter were volunteers and it worked great! The American Red Cross also trained lots of folks to do all manner of Life Saving, Life Guarding and other First Aid types of "Rescue" that we in San Diego now pay HUGE salaries and Pensions for. I myself have saved several drowning adults, two kids and even one toddler at the beach here in San Diego, because I am trained and I was there first! It is quite routine for surfers to "rescue" other swimmers; so it is NOT weird to suggest that many volunteers could easily be trained and used to augment our Paid Professional City Employees!

The Unions will of course fight this because this is their "turf" but it makes good common sense. When full time employees are needed they should be hired from the volunteers "pool" first as that would be an inducement for many to get involved and also prevent cronyism. Having a shortage of Fire Fighters for major fires, that all get to make super overtime and sleep at their squad vehicles while "on the clock" is no longer acceptable.

Our City's employees are going to have to "WORK SMARTER" and change the way they work to provide the Services we all need; San Diego cannot afford to do anything else. The Mayor and City Council should get behind this and "Make It So"!

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SurfPuppy619 Nov. 3, 2010 @ 7:22 p.m.

Founder, you just did it, you have brought up a very upsetting issue with our FF's, and be prepared for an avalanche of hate over what you wrote and a million reasons, from the FF's, why it will not work.

Of course you are correct, and the gravy train jig would be up-but that doesn't matter to the public employees, the only thing that matters to them is THEIR welfare, no one elses;

. http://citywatchla.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=4093 .

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LosAltos50 Nov. 3, 2010 @ 7:32 p.m.

reply to 37:

While the concept sounds tempting and worthy of trying, this idea reflects the way things used to be (and the way many of us wish they still were!), not the urban, dog eat dog reality of 2010.

Liability is the issue. Say a volunteer does not put out a fire in time, or uses water on an electrical fire- he/she gets sued, gets her house attached as part the lawsuit, liens on her bank accounts, etc.

Or a volunteer gets injured on the "job"- is there workers' comp to cover them? I could go on but for any public safety job (other than desk work or what the RSVP does) there is too much of a risk to the City to use volunteers.

There is such a legal morass that would ensue it would quickly deter most people from volunteering from these kinds of jobs. Even if the City promises to indemnify you, that does not make the suit go away.

I do think volunteers could do a lot of the clerical/admin/computer jobs- especially now with unemployment so high. But then the State Labor Board would probably rule that it's illegal and the unions would raise hell. Oy vey!

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paul Nov. 3, 2010 @ 7:36 p.m.

Response to #17 & #30

SP said: "If you take out the public employees who had a vested interest in getting D passed, it would have most likely failed by 3-1."

SP, there are (at least) two strong reasons why you are off the mark on this one;

1) The vast majority of city employees are not union hacks and don't want their sales tax raised any more than you do. The margin was undoubtedly narrower among city employees, but it wouldn't surprise me at all to find that it lost even among employees.

2) A sizable percentage of city employees don't live in the city and weren't eligible to vote either way.

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Don Bauder Nov. 3, 2010 @ 8:08 p.m.

Response to post #32: Yes, but these states and municipalities will probably be bailed out. I don't think Republicans in the House would really let California or New York massively default on debts. After all, the collateral damage would cause huge pain on Wall Street, which now owns more of Congress more than it did. Remember the big corporate/bank bailouts of the current mess came under George W. Bush. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 3, 2010 @ 8:11 p.m.

Response to post #33: Pat Flannery asks tough and relevant questions. That's why he is so unpopular at City Hall. Best, Don Bauder

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Visduh Nov. 3, 2010 @ 8:13 p.m.

As with many elections, this one was very hard to predict right up to the opening of the polls. SurfPuppy was right--it went down in flames. Where does that leave Porkbelly and several others, such as the woefully misguided Donna Frye? Many of us thought she was a lightweight, although Don believed otherwise. Why did she support D? It was probably because she had been looking at that city budget up close for a number of years and needed a safety valve.

I'm so glad that SD voters said "Hell No" to the tax. I can only wish that the Vista voters had done the same with our sales tax override a couple years ago. But what goes around comes around. Here in No County we had the odious "Bulldozer Bill" Horn win yet another term as supervisor, despite his record of seldom seeing a development or project he didn't like. (His neighbors in Valley Center don't vote for him, but the north county cities, who are not impacted by his chicanery, tend to like him.) His opponent was Steve Gronke, a Vista councilman who was all for the sales tax boost. Horn put out mailers that claimed that Gronke "never met a tax he didn't like" (fairly true), and was a union man (also true in that he is a long time member of the Vista Teachers Association, proud to be a member, and proud of the fact that his wife is its president.) Being a union guy and a tax boost supporter just didn't (and usually doesn't) resonate with No County voters this time. And so we get another four years of the No County version of Porkbelly Sanders, the local epitome of a "fat cat."

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Don Bauder Nov. 3, 2010 @ 8:17 p.m.

Response to post #34: Yes, that Feinstein story has been around for some time. It is shameful. Best, Don Bauder

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a2zresource Nov. 3, 2010 @ 8:18 p.m.

RE "Liability is the issue. ... There is such a legal morass that would ensue it would quickly deter most people from volunteering from these kinds of jobs. Even if the City promises to indemnify you, that does not make the suit go away":

This is the entire point of getting volunteers to be FEMA EMI-certified FIRST, so that NIMS/ICS standards compliance in an emergency response to any risk from any hazard is reimbursible from the federal government as a legitimate emergency or disaster response expense, stemming from a tasking of resources as part of the Comprehensive Emergency Management by objectives principals that controls FEMA under the National Response Framework, 24/7.

As long as any volunteer or other person has reported to the Incident Commander at a response and been tasked to do something during that response, then the agency that authorized the response (in this case City of San Diego) DOES indemnify because of course it's going to claim credit for fixing the problem. Someone can try to sue the city for something a volunteer does while responding to a city call for volunteers, but there is this thing called sovereign immunity... and at this point, we're generally talking about somebody suing all of us for trying to help that somebody out.

On the flip side, the person who doesn't do something about the neighbor's house that's burning down until it starts burning down that person's house probably isn't going to be getting any more holiday greeting cards from her or his insurance agent... if he or she still HAS an insurance agent.

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Don Bauder Nov. 3, 2010 @ 8:19 p.m.

Response to post #35: "They're ubiquitous! They're ubiquitous!" Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 3, 2010 @ 8:21 p.m.

Response to post #36: We'd be much better off with a volunteer mayor, chosen by random from the phone book. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 3, 2010 @ 8:23 p.m.

Response to post #37: You are right; San Diego should utilize volunteers. You are also right on this point; the unions will scream. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 3, 2010 @ 8:26 p.m.

Response to post #38: Maybe if Founder's house catches fire, the FFs will stand there and let it burn. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 3, 2010 @ 8:29 p.m.

Response to post #39: Yes, there could be legal snarls, but a state and/or municipality could write legislation to eliminate those snarls in the case of volunteers -- at least to the greatest extent possible. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 3, 2010 @ 8:30 p.m.

Response to post #40: You're up, SP. Is it true that the vast majority of city employees aren't unionized? Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 3, 2010 @ 8:34 p.m.

Response to post #43: You have described Horn accurately -- and also described Bilbray without mentioning his name. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 3, 2010 @ 8:36 p.m.

Response to post #45: Yes, volunteers are used in several ways already. These legal roadblocks can be dealt with. Best, Don Bauder

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Burwell Nov. 3, 2010 @ 9:42 p.m.

Sanders is in a real bind, and so is the city. Without the extra hundred million in sales tax revenue no underwriter will float the $500 million bond issue he needs to build Spanos Family Stadium. The fool also went ahead with construction of the Downtown Library even though he knew the till was at least $36 million short of the funds needed to pay for it. Sanders is a moron. He needs to be put in a penitentiary with a ball and chain around his leg.

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SurfPuppy619 Nov. 3, 2010 @ 11:46 p.m.

Sanders reminds me of Arnold (and even Obama), had BIG hopes going in, and that hope left little by little as days turned into months, and months into years..... with no improvement, in fact things have gotten worse, and not just in this city, but the state and country too.

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Founder Nov. 4, 2010 @ 8:29 a.m.

Reply #55 I agree with you, Arnold helped himself more than US!

Here is one of his lesser know "$IN$"; Arnold has "gutted" CA Workers Comp. Law, and now anyone that gets injured on the job is doomed to a life of crappy care, frustration and probably no future employment in a good paying job if any...

If you get hurt at work, my suggestion (if you have private insurance) is to leave work immediately and then get whatever is wrong with you treated by your own doctor!

Once you say you were Injured on the Job, you cannot even access your own health insurance and they will not be able to treat you! Expect years of hassles and that you will have to get a lawyer and give them part of any state mandated settlement.

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Don Bauder Nov. 4, 2010 @ 8:35 a.m.

Response to post #54: The point you make is an excellent one -- one that I have pondered. Did San Diegans thumb down Prop. D because they knew exactly where the money would go: for a $600 million subsidy to the billionaire Spanos family? Did San Diegans vote against Prop. D at least in part because it was a vote against a Chargers subsidy? That would have been logical. Sanders screwed himself: here he was claiming that safety services, libraries, etc. would be slashed without Prop. D, but then at the same time he touted the library, massive subsidy to the Chargers, convention center expansion and new city hall complex, and engineered the secret Sacramento deal that laid the groundwork for the stadium subsidy. You can see why people said it made no sense. It seems to me that San Diegans correctly want the basic services that government is supposed to provide, and not the subsidized downtown structures that line the pockets of developers. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 4, 2010 @ 8:37 a.m.

Response to post #55: The only people who are better off are those on Wall Street, particularly now that the Federal Reserve is clearly trying to maneuver a stock market upsweep -- destroying the dollar in the process. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 4, 2010 @ 8:40 a.m.

Response to post #56: The state is up against it financially. Rightly or wrongly, the Governator believed there had to be changes in workers comp. There have to be cuts somewhere. I don't know why anybody would want that job. Best, Don Bauder

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realnews Nov. 4, 2010 @ 9:03 a.m.

He's looking friendly now....but Nathan Fletcher smells blood in the water. :)

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a2zresource Nov. 4, 2010 @ 11:13 a.m.

The winds are getting hotter and drier.

FEMA EMI Independent Study Program (ISP) course IS-100 is an introduction to the Incident Command System (ICS). Anyone with prior military leadership experience will recognize the command and general staff structure of managing an incident response. ICS is a keep-it-simple expandable staffing structure for adding resources until there are enough of them to accomplish the objectives set during a given operational period.

The only mandatory position to fill in an ICS response is the Incident Commander, who may in turn activate other standard supporting positions as the response grows in complexity, but only if actually needed.

All responding resources report to the Incident Commander for operational period objectives and specific tasking assignments, providing contact information to allow for effective plain English communications. ICS command structures may integrate with DOD resources, but DOD retains operational control of military/naval/air units assigned in support.

All this and more:

http://training.fema.gov/emiweb/is/is100b.asp

From FEMA EMI on IS-100: "ICS 100, Introduction to the Incident Command System, introduces the Incident Command System (ICS) and provides the foundation for higher level ICS training. This course describes the history, features and principles, and organizational structure of the Incident Command System. It also explains the relationship between ICS and the National Incident Management System (NIMS)."

My personal list of NIMS/ICS courses together with the Professional Development Series, a kind of 90-day-wonder Officer Candidate School for emergency managers and volunteer coordinators:

http://www.facebook.com/note.php?note_id=126866664037280 (NIMS/ICS/NRF)

http://www.facebook.com/note.php?note_id=126855977371682 (PDS)

Everything is open-book at EMI - no need to cheat if you can read the course summaries! The purpose is not to see what you've memorized, but if you can use the job aids and other resources to accomplish the assigned objectives (pass the exam, save the world, etc.).

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Anon92107 Nov. 4, 2010 @ 11:19 a.m.

Response to post #57:

Yes Don, the U-T Editorial Board founded the Age of Larceny in San Diego that you keep exposing, perpetuated through their Puppet-Mayors Golding, Murphy and Sanders who made themselves and their special interests owners richer at the expense of public safety and quality of life in San Diego.

San Diego will not be able to recover until the U-T goes out of business and is replaced by the "Reader" because the DA and FBI just look the other way refusing to save San Diego from destruction by corrupt politicians and judges in the meantime.

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a2zresource Nov. 4, 2010 @ 11:28 a.m.

Apologies. Facebook requires a login.

Direct from FEMA EMI - the complete course list:

http://training.fema.gov/IS/crslist.asp

Note that IS-100 comes in many flavors, for hospital workers, police/firefighters, K-12 schools, colleges & universities, municipal workers...

A direct link to PDS:

http://training.fema.gov/IS/searchIS.asp?keywords=PDS

... and to NIMS/ICS/National Response Framework courses:

http://training.fema.gov/IS/NIMS.asp

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a2zresource Nov. 4, 2010 @ 12:16 p.m.

RE #5 @ "Safety employees shouldn't be retiring at ages 50 and 55 with huge pensions":

I would have much less of a problem with this if these city employees, so often comparing themselves to military veterans who retire after 20 years, were capable of stepping up (like soldiers, NCOs and commissioned officers are expected to do) to assume greater responsibilities and authority to do what is necessary to get things done around here. Otherwise, their level of discipline is just about zero for our purposes.

As a former infantry soldier who earlier received battalion-level command and staff instruction, it was assumed that if I held such a position, I might be faced with a call to handle brigade or division-level staff assignments, whether I was looking forward to that or not. City workers at the lowest level who do whatever it is they do should expect to manage volunteers doing the same work in a local fiscal crisis, or they can leave city employment and try to get private sector jobs with private sector compensation like the rest of us.

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Visduh Nov. 4, 2010 @ 12:34 p.m.

In response to Don's post #57, all I can say is that logic seldom has much to do with political campaigns and resultant election returns. If the people in San Diego saw the inconsistency, good for them. I think rather that they saw a raid on their depleted pocketbooks, and voted their own economic interests.

Surely, the fact that Porkbelly was talking out of both sides of his mouth did not aid the cause. That rot about building all those things should have been placed on hold during the campaign. That tells you how stupid he really is. But he wasn't too stupid to be elected mayor.

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Don Bauder Nov. 4, 2010 @ 1:01 p.m.

Response to post #60: Whose blood? Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 4, 2010 @ 1:03 p.m.

Response to post #61: That is a lot of good source material. Best, Don Bauder

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Anon92107 Nov. 4, 2010 @ 1:23 p.m.

Response to post #44:

Why haven't Feinstein and her husband Blum been exposed in San Diego like Peter Byrne has done in weeklies up in the Bay Area?

If democrats are committing larceny as bad as the republicans shouldn't the public be made aware that we are being robbed by both parties at federal, state and local levels?

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SanDiegoParrothead Nov. 4, 2010 @ 1:25 p.m.

Last THursday (pre-vote), I was traveling home from work on I15 southbound. On the Miramar Way overpass, above Northbound I15, was a parked firetruck, with 3 firemen in uniform, waving a big flag that said "Yes on D".

Aren't there rules prohibiting city emploiyed personnel from politicking?

THis seems like it should be against the law, if it isn't already. Unfortunately, I had to get home right away, or I would have stopped and taken pictures and names of those involved.

Anyone know if they're allowed to do this?

Since I did NOT see them on Friday, or Monday, I was wondering if someone had complained about this and their supervisors put a stop to it

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laplayaheritage Nov. 4, 2010 @ 1:49 p.m.

According to our Municpal Code Section 24.1102, the IRS, and SDCERS; the City of San Diego only owes Public Safety personnal lifetime Retiree Healthcare. General Retiree Healthcare for non-safety employees was never codified or written into law. The last thing David Wescoe tried to push before he left was to delete Municpal Code Section 24.1102 without an Actuary report. Thankfully Donna Frye, Carl DeMaio, and Tony Young asked for the required Actuary report. In order to allow Retiree Healthcare for the General population, a public vote would be required under Proposition B.

http://docs.sandiego.gov/municode/MuniCodeChapter02/Ch02Art04Division11.pdf

See top of Page 3 for Municipal Code Section 24.1102 "General members granted CERS benefits by this section shall not, pursuant to Sections 24.1201 and 24.1202, be eligible for City-sponsored Group Health Insurance for retirees."

www.tinyurl.com/SDHeathcare

City Attorney Jan Goldsmith wrote Report No. 09-142 linked above to the City Council regarding the issue in trying to change MC 24.1201 (see Pages 5 to 8). If the City Council tried to change the MC, a public vote would be required in order to increase the benefits of General Members, under MC Section 143.1a (Proposition B).

"SDCERS has also indicated that unless the Municipal Code is amended as requested to sanction the purchase allowances it has allowed since 1992, it will unwind all of them. SDCERS has allowed General Members to purchase SDCERS service credit with their refunded SDCERS contributions withdrawn when they enrolled in the 1981 Pension Plan and to afford these purchasing members retiree health benefits."

HTTP://WWW.SIGNONSANDIEGO.COM/NEWS/2010/SEP/01/STUDY-SHOWS-HOW-SAN-DIEGO-COULD-CLOSE-RETIREE-HEAL/

"San Diego leaders have talked for years about tackling a $1.36 billion deficit for the health care of the city’s retired workers but have taken little action. A new study shows just how much the city — and taxpayers — could save by making major changes to the benefit. By eliminating the benefit for current employees, the deficit would shrink to about $442 million. If it were capped at the current $8,880 annual payment, the deficit would be lowered to $969 million."

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Visduh Nov. 4, 2010 @ 1:51 p.m.

In today's Light News, there was a letter to the editor from a reader who wondered why the matter of the current state tax increase of 1% ending on July 1 of next year was not publicized. He opines that the outcome of the Prop D question might have been different. Hmm

He's saying that since that tax will drop from 8.75% to 7.75%, San Diegans would be willing to see a half percent boost and realize only a half-point drop next year. Say what?

For starters, we aren't sure that the "temporary" tax really will end on schedule; temporary taxes seldom are temporary. (I'll believe it when I see it.) Second, does he really think that people are now used to this highest-in-the-nation sales tax? I don't think so. I'm sure not used to it. It makes me seethe every time I have to pay it.

But, you know, he may be right. As in, "Hey, you'll not be seeing the overall sales tax go up. Why, it will still go down next year. So whatta ya' say ya' vote Yes?" Sigh.

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a2zresource Nov. 4, 2010 @ 2:20 p.m.

RE #71 "In today's Light News, there was a letter to the editor from a reader who wondered why the matter of the current state tax increase of 1% ending on July 1 of next year was not publicized. He opines that the outcome of the Prop D question might have been different. Hmm... He's saying that since that tax will drop from 8.75% to 7.75%, San Diegans would be willing to see a half percent boost and realize only a half-point drop next year. Say what? ":

Westfield Group/Horton plaza is yanking 130,000 square feet of retail space out of downtown San Diego... and that was with Proposition D FAILING. What if it had passed?


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Founder Nov. 4, 2010 @ 3:20 p.m.

Everyone needs to remember that Our City Council and Mayor are not very likely to cut their own Salary's and or Pensions...

That would require LEADERSHIP and GUTS...

In fact perhaps they all should recuse themselves and allow an independent Commission or Judge chosen at random make the BIG cuts required; and they then could tell their Union supporters that it was not "THEIR" fault!

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SurfPuppy619 Nov. 4, 2010 @ 4:37 p.m.

Our City Council and Mayor are not very likely to cut their own Salary's and or Pensions...

That would require LEADERSHIP and GUTS...

============== That's where leadership starts, at the top.

We have no leaders.

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SurfPuppy619 Nov. 4, 2010 @ 4:47 p.m.

For starters, we aren't sure that the "temporary" tax really will end on schedule; temporary taxes seldom are temporary

There is NO such thing as a "temporary tax", the use of the word "temporary" is just to get the tax started.

The Golden Gate Bridge and Oakland/SF Bay Bridge opened in 1936 and 1937, both had "temporary" tolls. Guess what, they are still in place today (only 20 times higher) 74 years later. And they will never be rescinded-ever.

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SurfPuppy619 Nov. 4, 2010 @ 4:52 p.m.

5 @ "Safety employees shouldn't be retiring at ages 50 and 55 with huge pensions":

I would have much less of a problem with this if these city employees, so often comparing themselves to military veterans who retire after 20 years, were capable of stepping up (like soldiers, NCOs and commissioned officers are expected to do) to assume greater responsibilities and authority to do what is necessary to get things done around here. Otherwise, their level of discipline is just about zero for our purposes.

There is no such thing as a "Police Mold", born heros, destined to protect and serve, one of a kind people.

The Police and Fire personnel who fought or died in 911 are the proven Heros, like those military who are in harms way, no one else. Making any comparison of PD/FD work to that is an insult.

There are Doctors, Lawyers, Dentists, Nurses, Airline Pilots, Scientists etc. who have demonstrated self discipline in their educational pursuits and in their personal interactions with fellow human beings.

People who come from stable backgrounds and have a life time history of personal accomplishment. It is not from this group that the majority of your Police Recruits blossom. These people do not want the job or have to work with those in it. And they would not be hired even if they wanted to be a Police Officer due to nepotism, cronyism and subjective hiring standards.

Just MHO.

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Founder Nov. 4, 2010 @ 5:38 p.m.

Reply #61, #62, #63 and #72 Great info links! Thanks from all of US that know that if needed we will be there!

SD Volunteers will be the REAL HERO's from now on!

Maybe we should start the SD Chapter of "Hero's Without Borders"...

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Founder Nov. 4, 2010 @ 5:41 p.m.

Reply #74

Would you rather I change the P, (as it would then describe SD) to a T?

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Founder Nov. 4, 2010 @ 5:47 p.m.

Reply #76 to my #73

I thought that $anders took NO salary during his first term and then said nothing about changing that until after he was elected "again", much to many folks concern! That to me spelled disaster for his reign...

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Founder Nov. 4, 2010 @ 5:49 p.m.

Reply #77 Well Said!

How would you like to be a Charter Member of the SD Chapter of "Hero's Without Borders"...?

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SurfPuppy619 Nov. 4, 2010 @ 8:21 p.m.

Since Sanders was elected in a special election after Murphy resigned, his first term wasn't 4 years. Does that mean he is eligible to run for another term after the current one ends?

No, 8 years total, since KFC Sanders served 3 years of Murphys term, he can only be relected once, because 3 years + two four year terms would exceed his 8 year limit.

. .

Sanders has aspirations for a higher office

KFC's chances of being elected to higher office are FAR less than Susan Goldings, and we all knwo how that worked out.

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Don Bauder Nov. 4, 2010 @ 8:46 p.m.

Response to post #62: Interesting thought: San Diego can't survive without the Reader's ascendance. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 4, 2010 @ 8:50 p.m.

Response to post #64: With the nation as deep as it is in financial muck, we may to re-think that 20-year military retirement, at least for some personnel. For example, I was a clerk-typist. I would not have deserved a retirement after 20 years. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 4, 2010 @ 8:53 p.m.

Response to post #65: Agreed. Sanders's stupidity was a major factor in the defeat of Prop. D. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 4, 2010 @ 8:55 p.m.

Response to poste #68: Agreed. Republican and Democratic larceny are both intolerable -- but, unfortunately, unstoppable. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 4, 2010 @ 8:58 p.m.

Response to post #69: There are federal rules (Hatch Act) but I don't know that there are local laws banning such egregious behavior. Maybe this display helped convince many to vote no on Prop. D. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 4, 2010 @ 9 p.m.

Response to poste #70: Healthcare could be a big saving. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 4, 2010 @ 9:03 p.m.

Response to posst #71: Right. You can almost say there is no such thing as a temporary tax. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 4, 2010 @ 9:06 p.m.

Response to post #72: Yes, that Horton Plaza project was always touted as a great success that showed that public/private projects (the euphemism for corporate socialism) worked. But it was obvious from the beginning that retailing was faltering in Horton Plaza. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 4, 2010 @ 9:07 p.m.

Response to post #73: A judge, yes -- a bankruptcy judge. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 4, 2010 @ 9:08 p.m.

Response to post #74: Amen. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 4, 2010 @ 9:10 p.m.

Response to post #74: The Coronado Bridge toll ended, though, as I recall, unless it has been started anew. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 4, 2010 @ 9:13 p.m.

Response to post #76: I think the emotional toll of his completely failed mayoralty may take some steam out of his desire for higher office. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 4, 2010 @ 9:18 p.m.

Response to post #77: There are many occupations more dangerous than police and fire jobs, and most of those jobs have none of the emoluments. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 4, 2010 @ 9:21 p.m.

Response to posts #s 78-83: Somebody is going to have to do some homework on this question of what counts as a term in office. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 4, 2010 @ 9:23 p.m.

Response to post #91: Maybe we have our answer. Best, Don Bauder

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a2zresource Nov. 4, 2010 @ 10:37 p.m.

RE "There is no such thing as a 'Police Mold', born heros, destined to protect and serve, one of a kind people. The Police and Fire personnel who fought or died in 911 are the proven Heros, like those military who are in harms way, no one else. Making any comparison of PD/FD work to that is an insult":

I'll argue that most people can be trained to have discipline (the military prefers the verb "can be inculcated" which apparently relates to trampling something into one's skull) with some significant number just washing out in the effort. Our problem is that not enough public safety employees have the sort of discipline it takes to develop personnel assets (beyond snitches and other low-level minions) in the neighborhoods they work in.

Of other city employees who man the desks, answer the phones and meet the public everyday, there apparently is no such disciple. Maybe I'm wrong, but SEIU seems to have pretty much taken care to eliminate that already.

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Burwell Nov. 4, 2010 @ 10:54 p.m.

Did San Diegans thumb down Prop. D because they knew exactly where the money would go: for a $600 million subsidy to the billionaire Spanos family? Bud Bauder

I don't think so. If given the opportunity, the electorate will vote in overwhelming numbers to authorize the city to issue bonds to build the Spanos Family Stadium. At the same time, the electorate will vote to deny the city the tax increase it needs to repay the bonds. The electorate wants to build a new stadium but does not want to raise taxes to pay for it. In the final analysis, the electorate will have its cake and eat it too. The stadium will be built and the city payroll will be slashed to pay for it. That's why the city employee unions should be fighting the stadium and the convention center expansion tooth and nail. The unions are run by idiots who cannot see their own self interest.

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Burwell Nov. 4, 2010 @ 11:22 p.m.

Here's what i find interesting. When Sanders was elected to his first term, he only collected $36k per year instead of his full salary, which I believe at the time was around $95k.

Matt Potter has reported that Sanders and his wife are raking in close to $300,000 per year. I don't know whether Sanders has to split his pension with his ex-wife. I assume she is pocketing half his pension. If Sanders is not adding his years as mayor to his pension calculation, then I wonder whether his current wife, Rana, will be eiligble for survivors pension benefits when he expires. I doubt she would be entitled to any pension benefits that were earned prior to the marriage. By refusing credit for his years as Mayor toward his pension he may potentially be depriving his current wife of survivors benefits in the event he expires.

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Anon92107 Nov. 5, 2010 @ 4:32 a.m.

Response to poste #87:

"Agreed. Republican and Democratic larceny are both intolerable -- but, unfortunately, unstoppable."

Don, your conclusion looks like an epitaph for our entire civilization since history proves that extinction is the only consequence of social, political and economic destruction, including never-ending wars, drought, pollution, monetary failure, disease, terrorism, poverty, overpopulation, immorality, avarice, gluttony, etc. failure modes that we are experiencing today.

Our brain just hasn't evolved enough for us to overcome our culture of self-destruction.

Have a nice day anyway.

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Anon92107 Nov. 5, 2010 @ 5:37 a.m.

Reply #74 & 94:

"We have no leaders." Right On SurfPuppy and Don.

As of now, our politicians have failed to accept accountability (like Sanders' use of taxpayer funds for personal wealth),

our business leaders have failed the test of giving a damn about quality of life for all San Diegans (like all the crooks that Don keeps exposing ad infinitum),

our university leaders have failed the test of responsibility (like UC Board of Regents' use of UC funding as personal piggy bank instead of public education), and

our church leaders have failed the tests of morality (like failures to actually practice the Ten Commandments).

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a2zresource Nov. 5, 2010 @ 7:03 a.m.

RE #105:

That pretty much sums it up.

Now that we know about it, perhaps we can use some of the tools provided to do something about it.

Regarding all of the FEMA EMI exams for certification: the test are not supremely easy, but there WERE designed with county officials in mind and are all open-book, open-note tests. It's not about memorization -- it's about whether or not one can use job aids to get the job done. If not passing, then re-tests are free... and sometimes I find it useful to repeat a course even though I won't get credit for it, just as a refresher.

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Don Bauder Nov. 5, 2010 @ 8:02 a.m.

Response to post #100: Both. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 5, 2010 @ 8:06 a.m.

Response to post #101: No military discipline for me, thanks. Best, Don Bauder

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Founder Nov. 5, 2010 @ 8:07 a.m.

Reply #105 The answer is to individually start to take responsibility for changing our City for the better. Just the folks in this Blog have made an important contribution toward a "Better" SD and the great discussions about Prop. D (for Dumb) I believe help defeat it!

One thing that has not been mentioned, AFAIK (As Far as I know) is that if the Guacamole Bowl $tadium does get built Downtown; I bet several Developers are already talking big $ to $anders, about building a million units where Qualcomm Stadium is now! If I am right, then I-8 would then become like I-15 and our City would have gridlock during rush hour both N & S and E & W!

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Don Bauder Nov. 5, 2010 @ 8:09 a.m.

Response to post #102: Remember, the city employee unions are in bed with the construction unions, which are in bed with CCDC and the real estate industry nabobs who run the city. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 5, 2010 @ 8:11 a.m.

Response to post #103: Good questions, and I don't know the answers to them. Best, Don Bauder

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a2zresource Nov. 5, 2010 @ 8:12 a.m.

RE #109:

Don Bauder is exempt from inculcated military discipline, but may be drafted as civilian commander in chief?

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Don Bauder Nov. 5, 2010 @ 8:14 a.m.

Response to post #104: It was just another way of saying that greed controls the human psyche. 'Twas ever thus. We evolved out of the jungle and are still there. When we're young, we think love makes the world go 'round. As we get older, we realize it's greed that makes the world go 'round -- and go awry. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 5, 2010 @ 8:16 a.m.

Response to post #105: I can't disagree. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 5, 2010 @ 8:19 a.m.

Response to post #106: FEMA is not going to rescue the world. It has enough problems trying to fulfill its own narrow mission. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 5, 2010 @ 8:22 a.m.

Response to post #107: There was an old song, "Accentuate the Positive, Eliminate the Negative." In short, be happy. But keep your wallet pocket buttoned tightly. Best, Don Bauder

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Anon92107 Nov. 5, 2010 @ 8:34 a.m.

Response to post #113:

a2zresource, I respect Don also, but we need him most right where he is right now, trying to prove that the pen can be mightier than the sword once again, and tell the truth about political propaganda that threatens Democracy more than ever before.

We still have Freedom of Speech, but it takes people like Ben Franklin and Don to produce and perpetuate it, especially in an era where far to many politicians once again want to take it away from us just like the Tories tried to do in the 18th century.

We live in a time that is so bad that even our university academicians are threatened to be politically correct or lose Freedom of Speech themselves.

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Don Bauder Nov. 5, 2010 @ 8:56 a.m.

Response to post #110: I doubt developers plan to build anything near the planned football stadium. Remember, most of the nearby condos that were built as a result of the ballpark scam are darned near empty. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 5, 2010 @ 8:58 a.m.

Response to post #113: If nominated I will not run, and if elected I will not serve. Best, Don Bauder

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SurfPuppy619 Nov. 5, 2010 @ 9:25 a.m.

By refusing credit for his years as Mayor toward his pension he may potentially be depriving his current wife of survivors benefits in the event he expires.

Not just survivor benefits.

This is an interesting issue-since a spouse is entitled to HALF of the pension the other spouse earns during the marriage.

The question becomes can one spouse (Sanders) repudiate a pension that the other spouse (current wife) has a legal right to??????

One could say that if the pension is not earned (or repudiated) then the other spouse has no right to it-since it is something not earned (or not taken). Does the spouse in the job (Sanders) have the right to do that unilaterally?

On the other hand the spouse who did NOT repudiate the pension can claim they (current wife) has a legal right to the pension and the pension cannot be repusiated by just the spouse (Sanders) earningit sinse there are two spouses who have a vested interest in the pension.

Now that is a legal mattaer I doubt the family courts have encountered.

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Don Bauder Nov. 5, 2010 @ 9:29 a.m.

Response to post #118: Your last paragraph is telling, and also on the mark. I can't think of anything more repugnant than how university presidents have sold out to Big Business. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 5, 2010 @ 9:31 a.m.

Response to post #121: These are excellent questions. I do not have the answers. I would hope that Sanders's ex-wife has a lawyer who is looking into these matters. Best, Don Bauder

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Russ Lewis Nov. 5, 2010 @ 11:18 a.m.

(#120) The deathless words of presidential candidate Pat Paulsen. Good to hear them again, Don.

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Don Bauder Nov. 5, 2010 @ 12:58 p.m.

Response to post #124: Let's never suggest that a San Diego politician -- much less an honorable mayor -- could be devious and deceptive. What are you, a cynic? Best, Don Bauder

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a2zresource Nov. 5, 2010 @ 1:25 p.m.

RE #106:

You're right about FEMA getting things done OR NOT. All I am interested in is getting more people here to have FEMA EMI certification, so WE can get things done and have the feds reimburse us locally for doing it under the always-active National Response Framework.

FEMA projects that in the first three or so days after a truly catastrophic disaster, we are on our own... right at the time when post-disaster trauma is worst among surviving victims. In the case of New Orleans, it was more like weeks.

As for city-managed volunteers taking care of more mundane city business because of big budge gaps, that too would be an emergency response, bt in this case it would be to the fiscal crisis of our civic leadership's making.

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SurfPuppy619 Nov. 5, 2010 @ 2:26 p.m.

He couldn't be that devious and deceptive. Seriously, I mean he’s just not that smart. LOL

Hahhaha......funny stuff.

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Don Bauder Nov. 5, 2010 @ 6:45 p.m.

Response to post #127: Remember that Mike ("Brownie, you're doing a heckuva job") Brown headed FEMA at the time of Katrina.

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Don Bauder Nov. 5, 2010 @ 6:47 p.m.

Response to posts #s 128 and 129: There's nobody jaded or cynical on this blog. Best, Don Bauder

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Anon92107 Nov. 6, 2010 @ 4:02 a.m.

Response to post #122: Two specific threats against California university public education and UC academicians that we must be most concerned about today are:

1) UC Board of Regents' threats against public education that academicians are not allowed to discuss in public because it involves use of UC funds by Feinstein-Blum are documented in:

"The University of California invests $53 million in two diploma mills controlled by UC Regents chairman Richard C. Blum --- The bottom line is that UC is investing tens of millions of public dollars in two for-profit school chains largely controlled by a regent and Wall Street arbitrager who sits on UC’s investment committee. Shown the documentation used to support this story Noah Stern, president of Associated Students at the University of California, says, “Student trust in the Regents was already shaky. In light of this revelation of investment abuse, we need a structural overhaul of the university governance system.” http://www.metroactive.com/features/diploma-mills.html

2) "GOP plans attacks on the EPA and climate scientists

If Republicans win control of the House, they plan to go after the Obama administration's environmental policies and the researchers who have offered evidence on global warming, whom they accuse of manipulating data."

http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-epa-battle-ahead-20101030,0,6040861.story

These GOP Chinese Communist like threats against Freedom of Speech specifically involve threats against world class IPCC climate change scientists at UCSD/SIO.

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Founder Nov. 6, 2010 @ 9:20 a.m.

Reply #132 I'd suggest adding what's happening in South Bay at SWC to your list of BIG Educational Problems: http://www.sandiegoreader.com/news/20...

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Don Bauder Nov. 6, 2010 @ 10:36 a.m.

Response to post #132: Blum has a lot of explaining to do. So do regents. Will anybody ask the questions? Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 6, 2010 @ 10:39 a.m.

Response to post #133: There will be BIG educational problems as long as Americans don't hold education in high esteem. Consider San Diego. All those redevelopment funds being stolen for unneeded downtown projects come out of education. But the establishment doesn't care. It would rather the City go broke pouring $600 million into a billionaire family's football stadium. Best, Don Bauder

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Anon92107 Nov. 7, 2010 @ 2:48 a.m.

Response to post #134:

"Blum has a lot of explaining to do. So do regents. Will anybody ask the questions?"

Peter Byrne is an investigative reporter who has "asked the questions" for several years in Bay Area weeklies and web sites.

Apparently Senator Feinstein has enough imperial senate power to eliminate any investigation of her husband by the FBI, same FBI that does nothing about government larceny in San Diego that you expose continuously with your investigative reporting.

Maybe all you investigative reporters in California should form an association to fight back against government larceny by raising the level of consciousness of every Californian to demand an end to all this. All we can do right now is replace corrupt congresspersons every two years and that doesn't seem to be working too well.

Maybe you should investigate the FBI to find out why larceny is allowed to destroy our economy, families, public safety and quality of life at federal, state and local levels. Some investigative reporter group has to use what is left of Freedom of the Press to "ask the questions" of the FBI.

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Don Bauder Nov. 7, 2010 @ 7:05 a.m.

Response to post #136: Sorry to say: the FBI, SEC, FTC, Justice Department, state and federal courts, ad nauseam know where the riches and power lie, and seldom dare to poke their heads there. We're getting close to being a plutonomy, if we're not there already. Best, Don Bauder

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Founder Nov. 7, 2010 @ 8:44 a.m.

Reply #137 And here I thought Pluto was "just" Mickey Mouse's Dog or that Planet way passed Uranus...

Yup, San Diego is and has been ruled by Plutocrats for several voting cycles now!

Some perfect examples are Ron Roberts and also the Kehoe, Atkins & Gloria legacy! Being a figure head is still "IN" in San Diego and it pays well also!

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Don Bauder Nov. 7, 2010 @ 5:15 p.m.

Response to post #138: San Diego has been ruled by plutocrats for more than several voting cycles. Back in the 1960s, San Diego was run by C. Arnholt Smith and John Alessio, two of the richest in town, who both wound up doing time.Best, Don Bauder

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a2zresource Nov. 7, 2010 @ 6:03 p.m.

RE "Blum has a lot of explaining to do. So do regents. Will anybody ask the questions?" and http://www.sandiegoreader.com/news/20... :

I've already made my comments on who needs to do the asking with respect to California community colleges in another thread following "Public Records Suggest Southwestern College Used Public Funds Frivolously".

Historically, students in the UC system have been well known for their concern and activism for many international issues. Now they must turn their scrutiny upon the UC Regents and the governance of their own university system. The UC students may lack the motivation, as none of those campuses is as close to losing accreditation as is Southwestern College.

Those of us who served on San Diego City College's Western Association of Schools and Colleges accreditation self-study committees since the 1990s are just watching our own local version of what happened in Compton College in 2006 in dumbfounded amazement.

I include this link below in case any Reader readers still have earned units at Southwestern College that have not yet been applied to a degree or transfer. The clock is ticking, and if (or more likely when) that campus cannot remove itself from probation by its last scheduled WASC inspection in March 2011, then the US Department of Education will require WASC to end Southwestern's accreditation.


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Don Bauder Nov. 7, 2010 @ 9:54 p.m.

Response to post #140: It would be very bad if Southwestern lost accreditation. Best, Don Bauder

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Anon92107 Nov. 8, 2010 @ 3:32 a.m.

Response to post #136: "Sorry to say: the FBI, SEC, FTC, Justice Department, state and federal courts, ad nauseam know where the riches and power lie, and seldom dare to poke their heads there."

Again, I most seriously emphasize and recommend: "Maybe you should investigate the FBI to find out why larceny is allowed to destroy our economy, families, public safety and quality of life at federal, state and local levels. Some investigative reporter group has to use what is left of Freedom of the Press to "ask the questions" of the FBI."

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Don Bauder Nov. 8, 2010 @ 6:50 a.m.

Response to post #142: Somebody might investigate the FBI for a book. A good starting point: why did J. Edgar Hoover pretend there was no organized crime? Was it because the Mob had something on him -- like photos? Best, Don Bauder

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Founder Nov. 8, 2010 @ 12:49 p.m.

Reply #143 If that's true, just think how much our Country has been harmed by one man in a position of power, fearing photo's of himself being caught in a dress or ...

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SurfPuppy619 Nov. 8, 2010 @ 1:52 p.m.

If that's true, just think how much our Country has been harmed by one man in a position of power, fearing photo's of himself being caught in a dress or ...

When you look back at the things J Edgar Hoover did while running the FBI-things NOT known at the time back then- he is a disgrace.

There was an effort a few years back to take the sliemballs name off the FBI building in Wahsington DC-it is a shame it never happened.

He was black mark on the FBI's solid reputation, and they have very few bac kmarks.

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Founder Nov. 8, 2010 @ 5:16 p.m.

Reply #145 I bet we could make a huge list of things like that we were told, that later proved to be all lies used to prop up some Administration and or Agenda!

UFO's - There are no UFO's Vietnam War - We're winning Iraq War - WMD were found Wall Street - No scam here J. W. Bush - Katrina Relief BP - It's a small leak FAA - We're here to help CA ABC - We support both side equally

...and the list goes on...

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Burwell Nov. 8, 2010 @ 7:38 p.m.

Hoover and companion Clyde Tolson used to vacation in La Jolla every year to attend the horse races in Del Mar. They always stayed at the Hotel Del Charro in La Jolla. The Del Charro was owned by Texas oil magnate Clint Murchison.

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Don Bauder Nov. 8, 2010 @ 8:02 p.m.

Response to post #144: But that's exactly what happened. Because the Mob had photos of Hoover's cross-dressing, the FBI pretended organized crime didn't exist. Meantime, mob-backed enterprises were taking over industries such as pro sports, vending, scrap metal, meatpacking, liquor distribution, financial services, etc., etc. The mob backed many conglomerates that in the 1960s and early 1970s tried to take over American industry. Fortunately, the conglomerates fell apart of their own internal fraudulence. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 8, 2010 @ 8:04 p.m.

Response to post #145: But that is a very big black eye. Hoover's reign was extremely deleterious to the U.S. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 8, 2010 @ 8:06 p.m.

Response to post #146: Are there UFOs? Sorry, I am a skeptic on that one. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 8, 2010 @ 8:16 p.m.

Response to post #147: Yes, and there is a lot about Murchison. We've been discussing the harm that Hoover's deliberate blindness to the Mob has done to the U.S. Here is just one example. The Mob moved into Cuba after World War II -- Lansky, Dalitz, Luciano, etc. Their puppet was the national leader, Battista. But Cubans were unhappy. A radical named Fidel Castro came to power in the late 1950s greatly because of Battista's brutalities and mob ties. Castro aligned his country with the communist bloc. There is a lot of history there. Best, Don Bauder

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SurfPuppy619 Nov. 8, 2010 @ 9:14 p.m.

JW is still missing in action, I wonder if he is sweating bullets over the solvency of the pension system now that Prop D failed (as if D would have done anything more than put a band aid on a shotgun injury)??????

If the pension fund is in trouble, the question will be what happens if San Diego is forced into a bankrutcy filing. And if a Chapter 9 is filed, will the City tried to shed a portion of the pensions??

I would be very worried if I were a gov employee and lived in SD, CV, LA, OC and a number of other muni's across this state.

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Founder Nov. 9, 2010 @ 6:53 a.m.

Reply #150 I'm not sure about UFO's but I have seen lights in the sky do maneuvers that no aircraft is capable of...

The real question is if there were UFO's wold our Gov't. tell US? I think not!

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Founder Nov. 9, 2010 @ 7:01 a.m.

Reply #152

Far better to have a HUGE Pension and lost than to never to have had a Huge Pension at all...

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SurfPuppy619 Nov. 9, 2010 @ 7:31 a.m.

Far better to have a HUGE Pension and lost than to never to have had a Huge Pension at all...

=============== Oh I agree!!!

And it is also far better to have a lottery style pension that was retroactively granted cut by 30% than have no pension at all.... like the situation in Prichard, AL right now.

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Founder Nov. 9, 2010 @ 10:44 a.m.

Reply #155 Make great fiscal $EN$E to everyone but All the pensioners and our City Leaders, who are looking forward or that are as in the Case of Fry weeks away from the trough!

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