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In its current edition, Money Magazine lists 25 towns and cities that are the best for those "seeking a sugar daddy (or sugar mama)." Says the magazine, "Follow the money to these towns and cities, where affluent young professionals are abundant." Third on the list of 25 is Coronado. A full 36.1% of residents are single. Median family income is $106,817. "Coronado is the perfect place for hanging out at the beach. Bond with fellow commuters on the ferry to downtown San Diego," effervesces the magazine, touting the "trendy bars and clubs in San Diego's Gaslamp district." Hermosa Beach is listed first and Arlington, Virginia, second.

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Comments

SurfPuppy619 July 13, 2009 @ 12:42 p.m.

"Follow the money to these towns and cities, where affluent young professionals are abundant." Third on the list of 25 is Coronado. A full 36.1% of residents are single.

Are they for real??

I hate to break the news to "Money Magazine", but the average age for those 36.1% residents has to be over age 60.

And the notion that "affluent young professionals are abundant" in a land locked City where the average cost of a home is well over $1.5 million dollars is preposterous (even the trust funders are far and few between).

Unless you are calling people in their 40's and 50's (and have been working in a high paying profession for 10-20 years) "affluent young professionals".

I don't call people in their 40's and 50's "young". I call them middle aged.

I call peoiple in their teens, 20's and up to their late 30's "young".

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Don Bauder July 13, 2009 @ 1:43 p.m.

Response to post #1: One question is whether military people count among the singles. That would lower the average age. However, the military people don't contribute much to income levels. Normally, statistics consider civilians -- but not always. Magazines just look at demographic stats in compiling these lists. They often don't do homework.

On the subject of magazines, news outlets are reporting that McGraw-Hill has hired Evercore Partners to sell ailing BusinessWeek Magazine. Evercore was hired by Copley Press to assist in the sale of the Union-Tribune.

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Visduh July 13, 2009 @ 3:04 p.m.

That picture of Coronado is stereotypical, and if it were only true would make it a great place. I wonder how many commuters who live in Coronado actually ride the ferry. To make that viable, you would have to live within walking distance of the dock on the Coronado side, and also work within walking distance of the Embarcadero. Undoubtedly a few do, but I doubt there are throngs. Then there's that allure of "trendy bars" in the Gaslamp. If anyone frequents those much of the time, it is necessary to be rich.

One of my offspring--early 30's--would be a perfect candidate for the lifestyle Money describes except that Coronado is out of reach pricewise for housing. Until recently it seemed the whole county was too costly, and that is for a single professional with what was once a handsome income.

If only these descriptions of urban paradises as the mags describe them were true. If only.

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Don Bauder July 13, 2009 @ 6:14 p.m.

Response to post #3: Yes, home prices are out of sight in Coronado, which, last time I looked, was categorized as "blighted" for redevelopment purposes. Best, Don Bauder

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Burwell July 13, 2009 @ 7:40 p.m.

I don't think many single professionals live in Corornado. Most of the young "professionals" in San Diego chose to blow their money on leased BMWs, expensive vacations, and expensive bars and restaurants. They are mostly interested in getting drunk and working out at the gym. Most of them have nothing in the bank, spend $500 per month on cell phones and text messaging, and live in luxury apartments with all the amenities. Many rack up credit card debts of $100,000 or more several years after moving here. Many will file bankruptcy before age 35, in addition to contracting herpes. Few of them could ever hope to accumulate enough cash to buy in Coronado. These losers tumble like ten pins in a bowling alley during recessions because they can't save money. I believe that a high proportion of Coronado homeowners are wealthy individuals from out of state who maintain vacation homes there.

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Visduh July 13, 2009 @ 8 p.m.

I agree with Burwell's appraisal of lifestyles of the affluent twenty- and thirty-somethings. But that kid of mine, early thirties, isn't doing those foolish things. Drives a Prius, has no credit card debt, has a nice nest egg already, and still could not imagine trying to buy in Coronado.

Coronado is not a town to make your money. Bring your own, having made it in some armpit of the world like Bakersfield, Barstow, Lubbock, or Houston. Then enjoy the fruits of your success in Coronado. Better yet, inherit a bundle, buy there, and live happily ever after.

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SurfPuppy619 July 13, 2009 @ 8:35 p.m.

I used to live in Coronado, and it was nice. Very quiet and laid back. You just don't see hip Yuppies there-it's not PB or South Beach Miami.

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Don Bauder July 13, 2009 @ 9:15 p.m.

Response to post #5: Like you, I would doubt how many wealthy single civilians live in Coronado. A large number of those 36.1% single residents are probably aged widows and widowers. The young adult singles you describe -- most of whom certainly don't live in Coronado -- don't sound prepared to face several more years of economic distress. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder July 13, 2009 @ 9:19 p.m.

Response to post #6: I think a lot of readers will envy you for the offspring you describe. We have one in the early 40s and another in the late 30s, and both have conservative lifestyles similar to the one you described. We consider ourselves very fortunate. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder July 13, 2009 @ 9:21 p.m.

Response to post #7: Coronado has almost nothing in common with PB. Best, Don Bauder

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johnegger23 July 13, 2009 @ 10:04 p.m.

This Money Magazine article completely missed the mark.

Coronado has minimal single young "professionals".

In fact, San Diego as a whole has minimal single young "professionals".

Most girls at age 26 move on to OC(the pretty ones), SF (the intelligent ones) or LA (the very pretty ones).

Males that move here typically do what Burwell says.

Move here, try to work but party more.

After 3 years all the cards are maxed out.

Move back to backwater they came from.

Rinse.

Repeat.

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Don Bauder July 14, 2009 @ 6:32 a.m.

Response to post #11: I think we are agreed all around that Coronado has very few rich, young professionals. It isn't a swinging place, like PB. Coronado has affluence, partly because the older people have houses worth a lot of money. I wonder if that story was reported by a local who was stringing for the publication, and gave the editors what they wanted, or a staffer from out of town who breezed in and came up with such nonsense, assisted by the local chamber of commerce. Remember the New York Times article of recent vintage that claimed Mayor Sanders had solved the pension problem? Same thing. Best, Don Bauder

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valueinvestingisdead July 14, 2009 @ 9:07 a.m.

Reply to #5 - People live way over their means, then go back home to live with mom and dad.

Problem is that cost of living is high and salaries low.

San Diego has been coined Man Diego for it's lack of single females. I think it has the worst ratio in the USA.

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johnegger23 July 14, 2009 @ 10:37 a.m.

"It isn't a swinging place, like PB."

I wouldn't even say PB has many "rich, young professionals" either.

Most are working to survive and pay the minimum balance on their cards, and hit up whichever bar has the $2 you call its that night.

"San Diego has been coined Man Diego for it's lack of single females."

Can anyone really think of a city with a worst ratio than San Diego? I can't.

Lately, I am hearing people call it Ban Diego. (cigarette and alcohol bans).

I really think San Diego has a huge marketing problem.

Especially when you consider San Diego has the potential to be one of the greatest cities in this country.

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Don Bauder July 14, 2009 @ 11:20 a.m.

Response to post #13: I think that male/female ratio in San Diego is greatly the result of large numbers of military, mostly men. I remember doing columns on this decades ago. However, the stats may only include civilians now; I just don't know. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder July 14, 2009 @ 11:29 a.m.

Response to post #14: I said PB was swinging; I didn't say it was affluent. According to city-data.com, San Diego County is 50.3% male and 49.7% female. Median age is 33.2, a hair below the state's 33.3 median. For years, incomes have been moderately above the national average, while the cost of living has been 40% to 50% higher. Best, Don Bauder

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SanDiegoParrothead July 14, 2009 @ 12:13 p.m.

Coronado, which, last time I looked, was categorized as "blighted" for redevelopment purposes.

=====================================

Are you serious ???

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SurfPuppy619 July 14, 2009 @ 12:30 p.m.

Coronado, which, last time I looked, was categorized as "blighted" for redevelopment purposes.

=====================================

Are you serious ???

By SanDiegoParrothead

You could get the Whitehouse declarded "blighted" under the vague, overbroad and ambiguous gov definition of that term today.

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johnegger23 July 14, 2009 @ 3:59 p.m.

"San Diego County is 50.3% male and 49.7% female."

I have seen this, which seems on paper decent, yet this statistic is one of the worst in the nation.

At bars (which is what really counts) the ratio is 5 to 1 male to female.

"For years, incomes have been moderately above the national average, while the cost of living has been 40% to 50% higher."

Exactly.

Hence the high usage of plastic and lack of liquid funds in san diego.

When was the last time you saw someone pull out a bag wad of cash to order drinks in this town?

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Don Bauder July 14, 2009 @ 5:05 p.m.

Response to post #17: Dead serious. I remember writing about it one time, but couldn't find it in Reader archives. But if you google "coronado" and "blighted" you will find a number of references to it. Ridiculous, isn't it? Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder July 14, 2009 @ 8:35 p.m.

Response to post #18: I believe that downtown San Diego is officially considered blighted. At least, it was at one time, and I assume still is. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder July 14, 2009 @ 8:40 p.m.

Response to post #19: Remember when the Holiday Bowl featured the winner of the league in which SDSU played? Almost every year, it was Brigham Young. Its coach said that the team's fans arrived with a ten dollar bill and the ten commandments and didn't break either. The hotels and saloons complained, and the Holiday Bowl changed formats. I doubt if Brigham Young has played in the game since. Best, Don Bauder

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jerome July 15, 2009 @ 8:02 a.m.

my observation> the past is long gone 60% of property...approx is rental, way overpriced much used for vacation old timers......

public low income housing is now available more to come; to the chagrin of the entiteled, yep sugar daddys are in high demand for those that cant get a life........ johnny is spot on#11 and #19,

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Ponzi July 15, 2009 @ 8:03 a.m.

The survey ruled out any city with a population “over 50,000” so that may be how Coronado slipped in. How many cities have youth and affluence and are under 50,000? They would be hard pressed to say Del Mar was a “singles town” or Lemon Grove “affluent.” I take their “Best Places To Live” with a grain of salt, it’s just a way they sell more copies of that issue.

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Visduh July 15, 2009 @ 9:12 a.m.

Those "best places" listings usually have no real quantifiable basis. The mags that put them out like to list some unknown and offbeat spots because it gets more people to buy a newsstand copy of the mag. Remember a few years ago when one of the more respected mags decided that Pittsburgh was the most liveable city in the US? That put it higher than SD and several other generally desirable West Coast cities. Pittsburgh? Pittsburgh??? The city of shades of gray. Yeah, that one.

More recently we've seen more of those listings that seem to fly in the face of any logic. AARP has put out listings of retirement cities, most of which turn out to be college/university towns of medium size. The common denominator there is the presence of a big medical center that turns out to be the teaching hospital for the medical school. Sunset has done something similar. The rankings are highly suspect for all of them.

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Don Bauder July 15, 2009 @ 9:15 a.m.

Response to post #23: But are the sugar daddies too old to do anything but dole out bread? Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder July 15, 2009 @ 9:18 a.m.

Response to post #25: Yes, the mags don't do their homework. But as you suggest, it may be a Machiavellian attempt to snare readers and advertisers, rather than a stupid move. Maybe a little of both. Best, Don Bauder

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aquarimary July 15, 2009 @ 10:04 a.m.

Funny- The locals call Coronado "home of the newlywed or nearly dead"!

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chanel May 27, 2012 @ 2:58 a.m.

u made that up .. iv lived in coronado for over 3o years have a child born raised there, no on has ever called it that....

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SurfPuppy619 July 15, 2009 @ 11:02 a.m.

I used to be a Coronado local and I never heard it called a home for the newlywed.

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johnegger23 July 15, 2009 @ 11:09 a.m.

"Its coach said that the team's fans arrived with a ten dollar bill and the ten commandments and didn't break either."

Good one.

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Don Bauder July 15, 2009 @ 11:18 a.m.

Response to post #28: Funny. But the Money mag story said Coronado was a haven for the rich and single. Neither apply. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder July 15, 2009 @ 11:20 a.m.

Response to post #29: Maybe the newly wed and nearly dead folks were one and the same. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder July 15, 2009 @ 11:36 a.m.

Response to post #30: Actually, Brigham Young had some great passing teams when it was coming to the Holiday Bowl. The team was fun to watch. Several of those quarterbacks, such as Steve Young and some guy named McMahon (Chicago Bears) went on to greatness or near greatness in the pros. But as always in San Diego, the money crowd won out. Best, Don Bauder

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SurfPuppy619 July 15, 2009 @ 11:53 a.m.

I'll tell you about experiences with BYU.

It was 1980 or 1981, don’t recall what year, but we were driving down to San Diego from the Bay Area and we passed what must have been 500 cars with BYU sticks on them and we could not figure out why there were so many-as it turned out it was BYU coming down to the Holiday Bowl and they brought half of Salt Lake City with them.

It was an amazing site to see so many people from one distant City making a pilgrimage to San Diego for a football game.

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johnegger23 July 15, 2009 @ 1:25 p.m.

"I really think San Diego has a huge marketing problem.

Especially when you consider San Diego has the potential to be one of the greatest cities in this country."

Another San Diego defeat:

Rugby Tournament Leaves for Las Vegas

http://www.sdbj.com/article.asp?aID=22673426.1740276.1805752.4922415.6102927.475&aID2=138895

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Visduh July 15, 2009 @ 8:03 p.m.

I heard that "newly wed or nearly dead" description used for Santa Barbara in the 60's and 70's, and it really didn't fit then. Later it was used to describe Monterey, and really didn't fit that place either. But, hey, it has a nice ring, doesn't it?

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SurfPuppy619 July 15, 2009 @ 8:36 p.m.

I have only heard "newly wed or nearly dead" description used to describe Florida. Never anywhere in CA.

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Don Bauder July 15, 2009 @ 9:46 p.m.

Response to post #34: Even more amazing is the experience my wife and I had a couple of years ago on our way to Sacramento. We stopped in Provo, where Brigham Young is located. There we ate at the best Indian restaurant we have ever discovered. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder July 15, 2009 @ 9:48 p.m.

Response to post #35: Is the cricket tournament staying? Quoits tournament? Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder July 15, 2009 @ 9:50 p.m.

Response to post #36: I think it works best in Florida. Where, I am not sure. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder July 15, 2009 @ 9:52 p.m.

Response to post #37: Yeah, Florida. Fort Lauderdale? Best, Don Bauder

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SurfPuppy619 July 16, 2009 @ 8:06 a.m.

We stopped in Provo, where Brigham Young is located.

By dbauder

Provo Utah is beautiful.

And the women there can certainly give San Diego a run for the money in the beauty department also.

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johnegger23 July 16, 2009 @ 8:56 a.m.

"Is the cricket tournament staying? Quoits tournament?"

Funny one.

Until till we lose Comic Con.

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Ponzi July 16, 2009 @ 9:50 a.m.

Pacific Beach is the "Roaring Twenties" - partying 20 somethings

Hillcrest is "the Gay Nineties" - either they're gay or they're in their 90's

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johnegger23 July 16, 2009 @ 10:11 a.m.

"Pacific Beach is the "Roaring Twenties" - partying 20 somethings

Hillcrest is "the Gay Nineties" - either they're gay or they're in their 90's"

The question is where are the young, professional affluent 30's in San Diego?

Are they in those northern san diego neighboorhoods called Orange County and LA?

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Ponzi July 16, 2009 @ 12:07 p.m.

I played around with some demographic data from the US Census Bureau by ZIP code.

By density. The highest number of “young “ (25 - 44), single, matched with highest incomes are 92122 (University City), 92075 (Solana Beach) and 92103 (Hillcrest).

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johnegger23 July 16, 2009 @ 7:26 p.m.

"The highest number of “young “ (25 - 44), single, matched with highest incomes are 92122 (University City), 92075 (Solana Beach) and 92103 (Hillcrest)."

These actually make sense.

Solana is super small, (13k?) so it wouldn't make an impact as a whole.

Hillcrest would explain the male to female ratio problem.

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chanel May 27, 2012 @ 3:01 a.m.

hill crest is mostly where the gays lives

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Don Bauder July 16, 2009 @ 9:48 p.m.

Response to post #42: I didn't notice the femme fatales. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder July 16, 2009 @ 9:51 p.m.

Response to post #43: I would rather lose Comic Con than go broke adding to the convention center just to keep it. It will go to Las Vegas some day anyway. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder July 16, 2009 @ 9:53 p.m.

Response to post #44: Those gags have been around for awhile, but they are still funny. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder July 16, 2009 @ 9:54 p.m.

Response to post #45: The affluent singles aren't in National City or El Cajon, anyway. Best, Don Bauder

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chanel May 27, 2012 @ 3:02 a.m.

they are in coronado , north country and la jolla

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Don Bauder July 16, 2009 @ 9:56 p.m.

Response to post #46: Congratulations for doing your homework. Those three certainly sound logical. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder July 16, 2009 @ 10 p.m.

Response to post #47: Ponzi was using comparative figures, I believe. Solana Beach doesn't have to be large if it has a high percentage of affluent young singles in the total population base. Best, Don Bauder

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