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San Diego County continues to lose jobs, according to the report for July issued today (Aug. 15) by the state's Employment Development Department. Nonfarm employment declined by 9,100 between June and July of this year. The county lost 4,600 jobs from July of 2007. Construction jobs were down 7,500 over the last year and financial jobs were down 4,700. Because of the school recess, government jobs were down 10,400 from June of this year. The unemployment rate was 6.4 percent in July, above the revised 6.0 percent of June and well above the 4.9 percent of a year ago. The July rate for California was 7.6 percent and for the nation 6.0 percent. Job growth has now been shrinking in four of the last five months. Average employment was down for the first half of this year.

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Comments

Don Bauder Aug. 16, 2008 @ 8:14 a.m.

Response to post #7: The above-suggested recall would be good news. Best, Don Bauder

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JohnnyVegas Aug. 16, 2008 @ 8:35 a.m.

God help us...How about some good news for a change?

LOL.... X2

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Anon92107 Aug. 15, 2008 @ 12:40 p.m.

Re: Transfer of my comment from “Spinrise” #155: “So thanks to the NORCers we have out of control inflation as reported in the news this morning and lost opportunities exported to other countries for the sake of short term profit and immediate gratification of avarice.”

This new column provides another of your reality checks of the fact that too few people refuse to fight back and now the consequences of their inaction are documented in this latest column in addition to your "Face Facts" column on Wednesday with Alan Gin's reality check “I see continued weakness through the end of this year and probably through the first half of 2009. There is no sign of a turnaround; the problems could continue beyond that,” in addition to the inflation news in the U-T and L.A. Times this morning.

I always wish that you would be successful at waking up the NORCers to take action to protect themselves from the bloodsuckers you expose continuously, then I would not need to blog at all.

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Don Bauder Aug. 15, 2008 @ 12:54 p.m.

Response to post #1: For the most part, the battle against the establishment is not related to the progress or lack of same of the local economy. Best, Don Bauder

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Anon92107 Aug. 15, 2008 @ 1:06 p.m.

Response to post #2: Except that actions by the San Diego businessmen and their puppets that you expose ceaselessly have a major negative impact on the local economy because their avarice dominates everything, e.g., the consequences of acts of corruption by Moores, McMillan, Sanders et al. have created so many negative consequences that the San Diego economy is now tanking faster than the national economy in many respects.

If we can stop them by supporting actions by Aguirre and Frye more aggressively we can begin turning around some of the home grown damages created by local Bloodsuckers.

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HelenaHandbasket Aug. 15, 2008 @ 11:46 p.m.

God help us...How about some good news for a change?

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Don Bauder Aug. 15, 2008 @ 5:17 p.m.

Response to post #3: You might make a case that the real estate development industry, which runs City Hall, overbuilt homes during the bubble without governmental restraint, and the subsequent crash has helped make San Diego more vulnerable than most of the rest of the U.S. Also, mortgage peddlers sold buyers a line of b.s. and created artificial demand that led to higher prices and ultimately the collapse. The big areas of job loss are in construction and finance. Best, Don Bauder

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Anon92107 Aug. 15, 2008 @ 8:28 p.m.

Response to post #4: Don't forget that we are the 12th highest taxed population in America, our schools post notoriously low test scores and violent crime has been out of control for far too many years because of failures in San Diego, Sacramento and Washington political leadership. That's the kind of failure that has caused democracies to fail before, so when we add to failures of Wall Street and Main Street to support American Democracy we are in a failure mode scenario for certain.

We can start by making changes locally, like recalling the Establishment's Puppetmayor Sanders, electing Frye as Mayor to replace him ASAP and re-electing Aguirre putting the courts on notice that we are outraged with what is going wrong in San Diego because of the failures in judicial leadership to protect San Diegans from far too many totally unacceptable consequences of corruption that increasingly threaten every family in San Diego.

There are a monumental number of problems in America today, but we must at least begin fighting back at the grass roots level here in San Diego and then work our way up the chain of corruption.

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Don Bauder Aug. 15, 2008 @ 8:59 p.m.

Response to post #5: Your solutions are sound ones. Aguirre should be reelected. Frye would make an excellent mayor. Recalling Sanders would be difficult, although he certainly deserves it. The real estate industry owns City Hall; that goes to the core of San Diego's cancer. Best, Don Bauder

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a2zresource Aug. 17, 2008 @ 7:25 a.m.

There are anecdotal reports that among the local former San Diego residents who could put up with the wait time to cross the border going north (why is it with all of the tourism draw to the south, nobody really has to wait to get into Mexico?), there is now a much tighter apartment rental market south of the border in Tijuana than is currently the case here in San Diego...

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a2zresource Aug. 16, 2008 @ 1:02 p.m.

I am assuming that the local unemployment rate would have been higher if more of the recently unemployed had not left town...

Does THAT qualify as good news?

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Don Bauder Aug. 16, 2008 @ 2:30 p.m.

Response to post #9: Good news: San Diego Opera continues to shine. Wagner's Tannhauser early this year was excellent. I understand the rest of the season was very good, too. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 16, 2008 @ 2:47 p.m.

Response to post #10: You are correct. Construction industry workers move around the country where there are jobs. Many have left San Diego in the current downturn. That accounts in part for lower population growth the last couple of years. One of the most important variables in population growth is jobs. They create in-migration. That has been very slow of late. Best, Don Bauder

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stevegrossca Aug. 17, 2008 @ 9:05 a.m.

the san diego economy will not rebound because they are hit with a two fold problem. Cost of housing in San Diego and cost of doing business within the state of California. Though real estate prices have declined significantly it is still too expensive for most business's to consider san diego as home and being within California the state tax and the total cost of business within the state drive everyone but those who have to be here away.

Until these two issues are addressed San Diego will not attract new and good employment. Biotechs and Hi-tech will put there r&d here because they are high paying but small in totalemployment,but will never put their manufacturing here because of the cost of doing business within California. And the manufacturing is where the bulk of the employment opportunities lie.

On the positive side the city and state do have an opportunity to attract the cross-border business if they decide it is a priority. with the cost of manufacturing and logistics in china going up expodentially many firms are again looking at mexico as a place to manufacture and assemble products for the u.s. market. San Diego could capture signficant employment over the next few years if they promote and understand the global opportunities that our proximity to mexico provides.

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JohnnyVegas Aug. 17, 2008 @ 10:40 a.m.

San Diego could capture signficant employment over the next few years if they promote and understand the global opportunities that our proximity to mexico provides.

While I agree with much of hwat you said, especially the tax problem, I do not think we need to export anymore manufacturing jobs- anywhere-including Mexico.

Manufacturing is the backbone of the middle class-without it there is no middle class. We have exported millions and millions of manufacturing jobs the last 3 decades-while we should have had a policy and plan in place that kept them here.

When the backbone of America is exported-then the country will fall apart-sooner or later-and that is exactly what we are seeing today, and for the last 25 years.

The only people making money in the middle class today are government employees and that is pretty much it. While the top 1/10 of the top 1% have seen their income expand 5,000% the last 20 years.

Read "Free Lunch" by David Cay Johnston-then you will see the big picture.

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Don Bauder Aug. 17, 2008 @ 11:02 a.m.

Response to post #13: The Tijuana apartment market tighter? Could be. Does that mean it is economical for Mexicans to move into San Diego apartments? Not necessarily. There are currency and job considerations. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 17, 2008 @ 11:07 a.m.

Response to post #14: The maquiladora (twin plant) concept could indeed begin gaining lost ground. However, the U.S. headquarters of the operation doesn't have to be in San Diego. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 17, 2008 @ 11:19 a.m.

Response to post #15: I am reading "Free Lunch" right now. Superb. Here's a stat from the IRS that tells it all, as cited by Johnston: "In 2005, the 300,000 men, women, and children who comprised the top tenth of 1 percent had nearly as much income as all 150 million Americans who make up the economic lower half of our population." And you wonder what has happened to the middle class? Johnston is a wordsmith: he shows more clearly than anyone has that the idea of "less government" championed by Ronald Reagan and those who followed him was a hoax. Reagan preached less government interference in business. But that was just a cover for what happened: business increasingly reached into government's pockets for subsidies, tax breaks, and the like. We don't have less government. We only have government that favors business. Best, Don Bauder

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