Independent Energy Solutions today announced that its rooftop solar installation for Wilco Industries in Vista has been completed. The installation is expected to generate about half a megawatt of clean, green electricity for San Diego Gas and Electric Company (SDG&E) to distribute to customers.

Project completion is a big plus for SDG&E, fitting the industry expectation of what DG (Distributed Generation) should be all about.

What power industry players want to see in DG is ownership of of the photovoltaic system and the electricity it produces, a long-term maintenance contract for long-term revenue, and credit for improving its percentage of power generated from alternative energy sources, not coal or natural gas.

What power industry players never want to see in DG is energy independence on the part of customers, industrial or residential. After all, if customers are energy self-sufficient to any degree, then that's a loss for power industry player shareholders, investors and speculators.

The Wilco Industries photovoltaic panel installation makes sense from the participants' points of view, or the thing would never have been done. It is large scale, it brings generating capacity home to San Diego County, and by golly, it's as cleanly green as anything composed of processed silicon, rare earths, and conducting material can be.

Unfortunately for small businesses and residential SDG&E customers, it won't do a thing to reduce the impact of PeakShift at Work/PeakShift at Home (PSW/PSH) increases in daytime electricity rates, designed by SDG&E to herd non-industrial-sized customers away from using power during normal business hours with higher small business and residential power usage rates. Of course, the SDG&E solution is just another social engineering project, designed to turn most of us into night-owls who only wash clothes or peek into the refrigerator around the time that bars end their happy hours.

It is possible for residential and small business SDG&E customers to reduce the regressive tax effect of PSW/PSH by generating our own power for use off the grid. There will be more on the incremental approach to residential energy independence in this blog later.

One can attempt to install grid-connected solar panels, but that's a good idea relative to off-grid generation only if one wishes to fill all of the hands that come out for collecting permit fees on grid-connected solar panels, from the City of San Diego for the property improvement permit fee to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission for its Qualifying Facility certification, or one simply does not get paid for excess electricity taken by SDG&E to be sold to the neighbors at a handsome profit.

Comments

Founder July 27, 2010 @ 1:11 p.m.

SdG&E is happy to have a few good photos, which makes for good press but does not do anything about addressing the situation affecting Residential rates that the CPUC has allowed to happen.

Perhaps it is part of a larger "plot" to curb usage because in 2050 we'll have more folks here using the electric grid; if that is the case, then in my opinion, that is even a bigger reason to protest the continuing unfair reimbursement of private solar energy producers for the very same kilowatt-age that SDG&E then instantly sells at a profit (for it's shareholders) to the general public!

SDG&E is positioning itself to make money on every Energy transaction, since they are a public monopoly and they are putting all those profits into the pockets of their shareholders instead of being spent where they belong, reducing the overall cost of everyones electricity...

Some law firm is going to make big bucks with a Class Action lawsuit; so at least SDG&E's shareholders will not get to keep all our money.

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a2zresource Aug. 1, 2010 @ 11:18 p.m.

A class action lawsuit is a lot like going to war, costing millions of dollars and many casualties with no guarantee of success even if all battles are won.

A more likely positive outcome could be had at the ballot box once San Diego voters realize that they hold the franchise power according to the 1970 San Diego ordinance that enshrines that power...

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