aardvark

Don Bauder May 2, 2012 @ 9:56 a.m.

Yes, how is Petco working out? Ever look at Padres attendance? One reason it's so low is the lousy location for logistics purposes, along with high prices. Ever assess the occupancy rate of those condos that got built in the ballpark district? (Answer: extremely low.) Have you read the mayor's latest budget indicating that Petco is costing the City $15 million a year when it was fraudulently touted as revenue-neutral in 1998? Glad you mentioned Stone Age. That's exactly what San Diego neighborhoods resemble, because all the money has been pouring downtown for corporate welfare projects and little has been going into the infrastructure or to the neighborhoods. "No development of anything downtown?" You have to be kidding. That's where almost ALL the development has been. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder May 2, 2012 @ 11:32 a.m.

Sorry. You are wrong. Check Padres attendance for the last several years at Petco. It is lower than it was the last several years at Qualcomm. Attendance surged the first few years at Petco then dropped below the Qualcomm average. That's how the scam works: the team gets its fat subsidy, gets a new facility, raises prices and attracts fans initially because of the novelty effect. Then the novelty wears off and prices have to come down -- one reason the Padres have been lowering prices the last several years. Best, Don Bauder

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x76 May 2, 2012 @ 4:33 p.m.

The area around "Petco" (AKA San Diego Municipal Baseball Stadium) is thriving??? What are you smoking?

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Don Bauder May 2, 2012 @ 5 p.m.

You seem to be talking about the Gaslamp Quarter. Generally, when downtown boosters talk of supposedly successful redevelopment projects, they talk of Petco, Horton Plaza, Liberty Station, and the Gaslamp. Only the Gaslamp is successful. Petco is a drain on an ailing city; Horton Plaza is NOT a successful shopping center -- part of it is being torn down (at City expense); Liberty Station should have been made into a park for the citizens of San Diego. It is only successful as a huge money maker for McMillin, which got the land for almost nothing. Best, Don Bauder

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ImJustABill May 3, 2012 @ 12:48 p.m.

Patrick Rishe, who wrote the Forbes article, has HIS OWN SPORTS CONSULTING FIRM. That's exactly the conflict of interest which could potentially lead to biassed results.

And usually I hate to point to credentials, as they are not as important as the details of the analysis. But I took a quick comparison of Prof. Rishe vs. Roger Noll (co-author of "Sports, Jobs, and Taxes" which concludes that stadia subsidies essentially shift money from taxpayers to sports owners and players).

Let's see:

Patirck Rishe (Forbes magazine author) BS UNCC PhD Binghampton Professor at Webster university

Roger Noll (Sports, Jobs and Taxes) BS CalTech PhD Harvard Professor at Stanford

I'd say Prof. Noll's CV is a bit more impressive.

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Don Bauder Sept. 12, 2012 @ 8:47 a.m.

Gee, you sound just like the cheerleaders at the U-T, Centre City Development Corp., and other downtown boosters who are hogging all the money downtown and applauding further neglect of infrastructure and neighborhoods. Hooray for you! Best, Don Bauder

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Brian_T_Peterson_DVM Sept. 12, 2012 @ 9 a.m.

“Filner wants to set up a neighborhood investment corporation…” Okay, so what is a neighborhood investment corporation? I did a brief online search. Evidently, Washington, D.C. has one, which is funded with property tax. And there was one in Michigan that went broke. Is Filner’s neighborhood investment corporation different from Jerry Sanders’ Civic San Diego?

Is Filner’s an infrastructure financing district? There are multiple bills coming out of the Legislature to make it easier for cities to establish infrastructure financing districts. Even Ben Hueso authored one.

Mainly, these bills would allow cities to establish one of these without a public vote. Their funding source would be some version of tax increment financing. And they would have eminent domain powers to fight something as vague as climate change. Would the Chargers’ new stadium have a retractable roof covered in native plants and solar panels?

The Chargers could even get a new stadium via redevelopment. The Successor Agency (the City Council) is intent on putting every payment—valid or not—on the enforceable obligation payment schedule for the former Redevelopment Agency. The Oversight Board rubberstamps these payments as they come up for review, and the state Department of Finance seems like they would like to wash their hands of the whole thing. Would Filner, if elected Mayor, put an end to this abuse?

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dotinga Sept. 13, 2012 @ 11:39 p.m.

I appreciate the pat on the head for being a nice boy. And I appreciate your valiant effort to ignore negative coverage of DeMaio in order to make your case about negative coverage of Filner.

If there's veritably incorrect information that's been published about either candidate, perhaps you could request a correction.

So let me get this straight about those "string-pulling backers." VOSD is under the sway of the liberal Democrat Irwin Jacobs BUT also controlled by the "establishment" (Republicans, of course), YET was founded by Neil Morgan, a noted liberal type, BUT is supported by board member Buzz Woolley, who doesn't like the influence of labor unions, YET gets money from a foundation of the liberal George Soros...

OMG! It's a liberal-conservative conspiracy! Please draw me a helpful flow chart of the lines of supremacy so I can keep track of who's controlling whom and, of course, who controls me and how. I need to get with the program!

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Don Bauder Oct. 11, 2012 @ 10:05 p.m.

Burwell, a number of San Diegans have told me that these two guys have to be finished off. The good news is that they are well on their way to finishing themselves off. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Oct. 26, 2012 @ 8:51 a.m.

SP: Trump has a big ego and an even bigger mouth. It amazes me that some people still think of him as a business genius just because he plays one on TV. Some of his bondholders have found out otherwise. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 9, 2012 @ 8 a.m.

califcomedy: I can't speak officially for the Reader, because I am not in management. However, I do think I can state my opinion as a private citizen who has written for the Reader for nine and a half years. I think the Reader does an excellent job attracting the young adult readers, and they make up a market most coveted by advertisers. The Reader also appeals to sophisticated older people who realize they are getting a lot of hooey from the downtown overlords who manipulate the mainstream media to push their agenda. The Reader is the one major publication that understands how the downtown potentates, through their puppets on the council and in the media, have been able to commandeer funds that rightfully belong to the neighborhoods. Filner promises to change that; I hope he does. In short, I think the Reader presents a product that reflects reality, while other local media continue to peddle myths. The public is wising to those myths. I think the Reader has a strong market out there. Best, Don Bauder

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SurfPuppy619 Nov. 21, 2012 @ 6:55 a.m.

Jack Goodall was the idito behind the Dale Akiki witch hunt that cost DA Edwin Miller his job-and rightly so-it also cost the taxpayers of San Diego over $5 million in settlements and other costs for the botched witch hunt that lasted 3 years and had Dale Akiki locked up in County the entire time. Thank God Kate Coyne was a comptetent and smart Public Defender.

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Dennis Dec. 19, 2012 @ 11:21 a.m.

This is the classic example of Rent Seeking, or corporate welfare. The Chargers are playing the same game to get a new stadium built with the city covering most of the costs. The Padres got a similar deal. No new wealth is created but the city provides subsidies that then reduce their ability to provide the services that the public pays taxes for. I certainly hope Filner does not fall for this deal.

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Javajoe25 Jan. 4, 2013 @ 10:26 p.m.

Another alternative is to park at the VA in Mission Valley and then take the free shuttle from there to the La Jolla facility. This is assuming you can find a space at the Mission Valley VA.

I've heard some are parking across Qualcomm Way at the K-Mart/Sears shopping center and then walking back. The whole situation is getting crazy. Maybe they should bring in Erwin Jacobs so he can come up with some loopy plan for a road that goes around the VA and then under the existing parking lot and coming up back where you started from...or some such. He seems to have the knack for that sort of thing.

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JustWondering Nov. 14, 2013 @ 7:27 a.m.

I thought that's what Medicare and Medicaid were for. BTW have you seen the tax rates in those so called advanced nations or the quality of medical care in places such as Cuba where the government makes all the decisions ...on everything. Too many people think they are entitled...too few are willing to bare the costs. Can improvements be made? You bet they can and should be. But the current plan, the Obamacare Tax Act, inappropriately named Affordable Care Act is NOT affordable and NOT the answer.

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eastlaker Jan. 11, 2013 @ 7:17 p.m.

The conclusion would be that he filled up the RV on the public's dime.

With all those meals, it's a pity he didn't have a methane conversion system, because he could have powered his own vehicles...

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Don Bauder Nov. 2, 2013 @ 10:42 a.m.

aardvark: I don't know that the canaries got any smarter. Most, after being cured of constipation, were lowered into coal mines. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 2, 2013 @ 10:48 a.m.

CaptD: Our owner/publisher/editor Jim Holman has confirmed publicly that the U-T has inquired about buying the Reader. Jim has expressed no interest in such a transaction. Best, Don Bauder

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Visduh Feb. 9, 2013 @ 8:10 p.m.

On occasion I've considered running for office. In addition to my innate laziness, I'm a rather private person, and at my age, the notion of upsetting my carefully-crafted retirement to "straighten things out" doesn't appeal. There must be others out there, many years my junior, who have a need to make their marks, who could/should run for office. Unfortunately, few of them can afford the time and loss of income, almost always as underpaid minions in the private sector, to run for office. That may be why we have such rotten political leadership now.

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