Writeon

David Dodd July 3, 2013 @ 1:17 p.m.

I'm very proud of the Reader for this piece, the entire coverage of Jeff Olson's ordeal, and for exposing the audacity of the City Attorney for prosecuting Olsen with taxpayer dollars (the City Attorney should not only be dismissed but also be order to pay all court expenses out-of-pocket). This made National news, and thanks to Mr. Hargrove, it is a perfect example of how alternative weekly publications are notoriously necessary, since mainstream media fails to provide proper coverage on how all branches of government are so easily manhandled by huge corporations. Olson has proven his point here, even more so than having done nothing more than drawing what amounts to harmless hopscotch chalk patterns on city sidewalks, in that large corporate entities seem to be powerful enough to direct the government to cast off a shoe and use it to smash us often-helpless slugs into submission. Good job Mr. Hargrove, and good job Mr. Olson, I thank you both.

8

HonestGovernment July 3, 2013 @ 3:03 p.m.

Great to read about all the background on Jeff Olson and the lead-up to the charges and trial. Good story, and congratulations to Dorian Hargrove for shining a light on the events. Also, congratulations to Jeff Olson and Tom Tosdal for standing up for principle and for winning.

Hoping this is Part 1. Want to know more about the courtroom atmosphere and the jurors. More!

I continue to be shocked at the thought of Jeff Olson losing his 4th Amendment rights in order to avoid trial. Are the San Diego cops so overstaffed and unbusy that they could find time to randomly search Olson's home and person, ... for chalk or political literature? What?

The extreme plea deals offered and the arrogance of the judge, who criticized the press and media for reporting the maximum charges Jeff Olson faced (as if reporters are obligated to assure the public that the worst would never happen?), are frightening. I hope this abuse of the City Attorney's office brings about some internal changes in the official protocol for deciding on charges brought, and some deep introspection among the Deputy City Attorneys as to the political nature of the office and their boss. They might do a little protesting of their own in the future. I'm also curious if any of the five DCAs in the courtroom on the final day were from the Civil Rights division, if there is one.

4

BlueSouthPark July 3, 2013 @ 5:21 p.m.

I wondered what Olson's T-shirt said. Knowing that it says I am displeased with the entire situation makes me even madder that the "deals" that the city offered included anger management. Olson presented himself with gentle mildness when confronted by the BofA security jerk and by the police officers who were sicced on Olson. Even the chalked protests were polite, as I'm sure the jury noticed.

The cheapest, laziest way to insult someone whose point of view is at variance with your own is to declare them "angry" or in need of behavior modification. It's the sort of cheap shot that Goldsmith and the cabal take toward Mayor Filner, day in and day out. Those people place great value on sticking the knife in with a quiet and sickly smile, smug comments, and supercilious remonstrations. It prevails in the City Attorney's office. The "deal" for Olson of taking anger management classes was twisted and insulting. In honor of Kafka's birthday, I'll paraphrase: In the fight between Goldy's cabal and the world, I'll back the world. Round One goes to Olson-Tosdal.

(Goldsmith and the cabal, so pissed that DeMaio didn't win, must have never seen him fly into a rage in council meetings, demeaning anyone who didn't agree with him. We really are blessed that he is confined to sending out pleas for money, and isn't sitting in City Hall giving away favors and money to the cabal. I'll take Filner's honest outrage, any day, and wish we had a City Attorney that was his equal.)

3

Fred Williams July 3, 2013 @ 9:08 p.m.

Jeff Olson's acquittal on all counts is not the end of this saga.

Next, let's watch Goldsmith squirm, as Freeman loses his job, and the City and SDPD are sued for damages.

But I bet Olson being a true gentleman, would agree to drop the matter if Goldsmith, Officer Miles, and Freeman would simply apologize with sincerity and refrain from such misconduct in the future.

Perhaps the Mayor's office could arrange a press conference where he apologizes, on behalf of the City, and invites Goldsmith and the others to do so as well.

That would be sweet...and justified, and the only scenario where the city doesn't lose even more money because of ferret-top and the SDPD maliciously collaborating with big businesses to violate the constitutional rights of citizens.

3

BlueSouthPark July 3, 2013 @ 10:11 p.m.

That's a nice idea, Fred. I like it. Also, Filner could announce he isn't going to attend any more closed sessions until Goldsmith apologizes to everyone and Andrew Jones apologizes to Rosa Parks' family.

2

dlwatib July 5, 2013 @ 11:56 a.m.

Thank God the jury had a modicum of common sense and refused to convict on such ridiculous, trumped-up charges. But we are still left with the evidence that our police force, our District Attorney, and the judge in the case were too corrupt to see the stupidity of prosecuting this case in the first place. Plus, where were the voices of reason in our state legislature when it was decided to include chalk markings as vandalism?

I can't believe that the generation that lived through the protests of the Vietnam War era would grow up into such doltish totalitarian dictators. At least this protestor didn't get gunned down like the protestors at Kent State.

4

HonestGovernment July 4, 2013 @ 4:53 p.m.

This charge filed by Goldsmith's attorneys led me to do a little reading about who Goldsmith is. I started with this profile. It says nothing about what he was doing prior to 1988, pretty odd for someone who was admitted to the Cal Bar in 1976. The San Diego Daily Transcript had the only Internet mention of his work and partnership at two law firms, Seltzer Caplan and Dorazio, Barnhorst, Goldsmith & Bonar. I couldn't imagine why these affiliations aren't present in any of his public resumes.

Perhaps this is why: His biggest claim to fame at Dorazio, Barnhorst, Goldsmith & Bonar was, from 1981 to 1985, defending against deportation a former officer of the Latvian Political Police. The Board of Immigration ruling for deportation produced witnesses describing Goldsmith's client, as an "armed, paid, full-time, relatively high-ranking officer" who, from 1941 to 1943, at a Riga, Latvia Nazi-controlled prison "assisted and otherwise participated in the persecution of persons because of political opinion." It's just so ironic.

Goldsmith took the case to the US Court of Appeals, Ninth Circuit, and won, based on the narrow ruling that no living witnesses were produced who could actually state that they were beaten or tortured (or killed?). Goldsmith's client, Laipenieks, was not deported and remained in the US, dying in 1998 in La Jolla at the age of 84.

2

rdotinga July 4, 2013 @ 5:38 p.m.

That's very interesting background. But it's hard to know if the case against the Latvian guy was bogus or not.

Btw, the profiles on the site you mention don't seem to include non-political jobs. Bob Filner's bio, for example, only starts in 1975. http://www.joincalifornia.com/candidate/5980

1

bartleby88 July 5, 2013 @ 12:41 p.m.

Unfortunately, nowadays when a government official says he is "concerned with the public welfare" means there is a red flag going up and you better be very careful in what will happen next.

1

HonestGovernment July 4, 2013 @ 4:06 p.m.

When anyone from the San Diego City Attorney's office starts talking about the quality of life of residents, I want to run far, far away.

2

SurfPuppy619 July 4, 2013 @ 6:22 p.m.

Tell Ferret Head to ask B of A[ss] how the "quality of life" is going for the home owners they DEFRAUDED with their robo-signing foreclosures.......

3

SurfPuppy619 July 4, 2013 @ 3:45 p.m.

"Deputy city attorney Hazard fires back, “The people do feel chalk is defacement. Mr. Olson did not seek authorization from the Bank of America or the City of San Diego to write messages on the sidewalk." Oh brother......"authorization" on a public sidewalk...Hazard should put on a Batman outfit and try to act in movies instead of a courtroom.

"The goal of this case is to address blight. We prosecute cases to protect the quality of life for residents.” The goal of this case was to jump at the command of your corporate master. I wonder if Squirrel Toupee can "Roll Over" and "Sit" just as good.......

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