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At 11:22 a.m. on August 5, a 1940s-era bi-winged light plane crashed and flipped over on approach to Oceanside Municipal Airport. Oceanside police officers arrived to find the pilot, Lance Murray, and his passenger Daniel Harabagiu, were able to walk away from the crash with minor abrasions.

The plane rested upside-down in a field across Foussat Drive, just off Highway 76, about 100 yards from the beginning of the airport’s runway. No fluids spilled, so there was no risk of fire danger in the dry brush.

The flyers didn’t stick around to talk to the media. A person on site around 3:00 p.m. was there to investigate the crash for the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board but wasn’t willing to comment to the media.

According to department’s public information officer, Lt. Leonard Cosby, the plane was expected to be towed away by 5:00 p.m.

According to initial reports, the flight originally took off from Carlsbad’s Palomar Airport and was attempting to make a landing at Oceanside when the plane lost power. The plane was not part of the bi-plane tour rides one can take out of Carlsbad airport.

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Comments

Don Cordier Aug. 6, 2014 @ 7:46 a.m.

I believe this is a mid-eighties Christen "Eagle" and not a WWII "a 1940s-era bi-winged light plane". I only mention this fact as I do not want people to work to ground older aircraft merely based upon their perceived age!

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Ken Harrison Aug. 6, 2014 @ 1:06 p.m.

You are probably correct Don. I took the info on the possible type of plane from other media sources. My conversation with OPD did not include model of the plane. Looking at my photo now, it clearly is not a 1940s plane. The popped-off curved one piece cowling (not seen in the photo) and the aerodynamic wheel covers should have been my first clue. I didn't know they made biplanes later than 1940s. I guess for air shows and stuff like that? Thanks for the tip!

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Ken Harrison Aug. 6, 2014 @ 1:07 p.m.

Plus I used a zoom lens and couldn't really get that close into the field to look at.

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CaptD Aug. 6, 2014 @ 5:35 p.m.

Don - Good call, I agree with all of what you said.

Glad pilot and passenger walked away. I bet the aircraft can be repaired to fly again.

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Ponzi Aug. 6, 2014 @ 7:16 p.m.

FAA Aircraft Registration (N88EW)

SUMMARY: 1985 CHRISTEN INDUSTRIES INC PITTS S-2B Fixed wing single engine - (2 seats / 1 engine) ENGINE: LYCOMING AEIO-540 SER Horsepower: 260 (Reciprocating)

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Ken Harrison Aug. 6, 2014 @ 7:46 p.m.

Now I learned something Ponz, obviously there is web site where one can look up tail #'s?

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Ponzi Aug. 6, 2014 @ 7:19 p.m.

Was it a good ending because biplanes allow you to achieve such low air speeds that the crash won't be as fierce and modern single-wing designs?

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Ken Harrison Aug. 6, 2014 @ 7:58 p.m.

I'm assuming that's why they walked away. Low air speed, but then I'm no pilot. I can crash my flight simulator into the Catalina Island airport without even trying hard. Instruments? I don't need no sticking instruments.

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