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According to Smith Travel Research, occupancy of San Diego hotels year-to-date through October was up only 0.8 percent from the same period a year ago, to 73.6 percent.

For the first ten months of this year, San Francisco was up 2.9 percent, Orange County 2.3 Local hotel business will lag state through next year, and Los Angeles 1.7 percent.

Hotel expert Jerry Morrison says it is "great news" that $17 million of marketing funds have been restored, but he says local hotel business will lag the other coastal California metro areas through next year. The sequester is hitting San Diego hard, as military-related business is down.

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Psycholizard Nov. 28, 2013 @ 12:58 p.m.

Word on the street is that restrictive drinking and smoking laws hurt our nightclub and tourism businesses in the beach areas. Many say that the beach drinking ban had an immediate noticeable negative effect. A consensus of bartenders and doormen doesn't make something true, but relaxing vice laws can improve tourism, take Las Vegas, so restrictions plausibly could hurt business.

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Don Bauder Nov. 28, 2013 @ 1:32 p.m.

Psycholizard. That may be true. But do you want San Diego to be as wide open as Vegas? Best, Don Bauder

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Burwell Nov. 28, 2013 @ 2:24 p.m.

The tourists the tourist industry wants to attract do not smoke or hang out in bars. The industry wants well-off tourists to fly in from New York with thick wallets. Tourists like this easily spend $3,000 or more on $275 a night hotel rooms, rented cars, eating at top restaurants, and expensive clothes at shopping centers. The smokers and drinkers typically drive in from places like Long Beach four to a car and stay at the Motel 6 packed in a single room at $60 a night and spend next to nothing. If drinking at the beach was not illegal, these tourists would simply sit on the beach for free getting drunk on $5 six packs from Seven Eleven and eating $3 meals at Taco Bell. The lower tier clog the parking lots at the beaches and to a great extent are driving away the well-heeled clientele the hotel owners want to attract.

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Don Bauder Nov. 28, 2013 @ 3:14 p.m.

Burwell. Sound observations. I maintain that one deterrent to tourism, including affluent travelers, is the horrible shape of the infrastructure. Best, don bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 28, 2013 @ 9:37 p.m.

Viewer. Democrats outnumber Republicsns in the city. Countywide, it is almost split even. Best, Don Bauder

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Psycholizard Nov. 29, 2013 @ 10:03 a.m.

Many thought thirsty tourists would drink in bars rather than on the beach, if reports are correct, they just went elsewhere. Police and City efforts to reduce unruly crowds have perhaps reduced crowds in general, and hurt the City in the pocketbook. We don't want to be Las Vegas, but we should provide outdoor places to smoke and drink reasonably. Our politics sometimes seem dominated by those waiting to quietly die, rather than those aiming to entertain tourists and make a living.

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Burwell Nov. 29, 2013 @ 12:24 p.m.

The thirsty tourists Psycholizard describes are an overall detriment to the tourist industry and spend very little money and cause nothing but trouble. They discourage tourists with money from coming here due to their drunken behavior. Thirsty tourists do nothing to fill Terry Brown's or Papa Doug's cash registers. These tourists do not generate revenue expensive hotels need to pay their mortgages. That's what the occupancy rate is all about: hotels need a certain percentage level of occupancy to generate enough cash to pay the banks and an even higher level to eke out a small profit. When tourists with money to spend go to the beach areas and see drunken derelicts stumbling around and tattooed gang bangers walking around with no shirts, they go home and tell their friends to stay away. It's not the quantity of tourists that count, it's the quality. The bar scene in Pacific Beach is a race for the bottom.

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Don Bauder Nov. 29, 2013 @ 12:36 p.m.

Burwell. On the other hand, local tourism boosters quietly encourage the hookers. Best, Don Bauder

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lucasoconnor Dec. 2, 2013 @ 12:18 p.m.

Ugh. Why won't the hoi polloi just stay in their ghettos where they belong? It's amazing how much money those hoteliers manage to make from just ekeing out a living... those derelicts should take a lesson or two in how to grip their bootstraps. Maybe we could try armed checkpoints with Studio 54-style bouncers to keep the riff raff out of sight and away from Terry Brown's profit margins. Come to think of it though, what with the beach being free and all we probably want those walking cash registers to be scared back to the Riverwalk. No freeloading on vacation around HERE!

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Don Bauder Dec. 3, 2013 @ 3:27 p.m.

lucasoconnor: The hoteliers just eke out a living? They have fat profit margins, thanks greatly to subsidies they get from taxpayers. Then, since the owners of the large hotels are largely based elsewhere, San Diego doesn't share in the profits. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 29, 2013 @ 12:30 p.m.

Psycholizard. Now, local hookers fly to Las Vegas on weekends. Maybe that should be reversed. Best,Don Bauder

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Psycholizard Nov. 29, 2013 @ 5:54 p.m.

It's tough for San Diego prostitutes, too much amateur competition.

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Don Bauder Nov. 30, 2013 @ 9:45 a.m.

Psycholizard. Thatisa perceptive observation. Best,DonBauder

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Psycholizard Nov. 29, 2013 @ 6:22 p.m.

California Beaches are open to the public. BTW those who don't want to see men with no shirts, shouldn't go to the beach. Just a suggestion.

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Don Bauder Nov. 30, 2013 @ 9:47 a.m.

Psycholizard. A wise. Observation. Best, Don Bauder

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