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Lloyd Irving Taylor was arraigned in San Diego's U.S. District Court today, December 12, on charges of aggravated identity theft, tax evasion, and other crimes.

The indictment alleges that Taylor stole the identities of nine people, many of whom died at an early age in the 1950s. He obtained birth certificates and used the information to create fraudulent passports and other identification documents.

Taylor then opened accounts and stuffed assets in them, in part to evade taxes, according to the indictment. He also opened accounts in the names of fictitious religious institutions to elude the Internal Revenue Service.

He made significant income in the accounts but has not paid taxes since 2003, according to the U.S. Attorney's Office. He has been in custody since April.

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Comments

Visduh Dec. 12, 2013 @ 4:46 p.m.

Whoa, he's been in custody since April and is only now arraigned? That's not speedy justice by any measure. What sort of legal counsel does he have?

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MURPHYJUNK Dec. 13, 2013 @ 8:33 a.m.

maybe if took this long to figure out what his real id is :)

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Don Bauder Dec. 13, 2013 @ 10:48 a.m.

Murphyjunk: You may be right: he concealed the identities he stole extremely well. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Dec. 12, 2013 @ 6:56 p.m.

Visduh: It sounds like he has a good lawyer or lawyers but I don't know the details. The defense wants to stall. Best, Don Bauder

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Visduh Dec. 13, 2013 @ 5:28 p.m.

Perhaps. But there are better places to wait out a "stall" than the local county lockup. I'd think he would prefer a fleabag motel to staying in jail.

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Don Bauder Dec. 13, 2013 @ 8:29 p.m.

Visduh: True, but it seems to me that stalling is a tactic used by the defense in just about all cases. Justice delayed is a victory for them. Best, Don Bauder

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jnojr Dec. 15, 2013 @ 9:54 a.m.

Years ago, there were "how to get ID" books that explained looking for infants who had died around the time you were born, researching enough info to get copies of the birth certificates, and then using them to build identities. None of that could possibly work today. But I wouldn't be surprised if there are people today who have carefully cultivated alternate IDs, "just in case". Using them to commit crimes is just going to draw attention, like in this case. I doubt they'd be worth much other than as a one-time expendable... the moment a fingerprint is taken, the game is up.

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Don Bauder Dec. 15, 2013 @ 2:05 p.m.

jnojr: Identity theft takes more sophistication these days. Best, Don Bauder

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