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Let us seek for comfort where alone it may be found, let us learn a dutiful acquiescence in whatsoever proceeds from that Great Being from whom we ourselves proceeded and who being the sole Author of all our enjoyments has an undoubted Right to withdraw them in his own good time and whose Goodness so conspicuous in his General Providence may be as eminent for aught we know though not so plainly discerned even when he deals to us the bitter cup of Affliction. We may all profit in the School of Adversity if we will but make a proper use of its Sacred Lessons. If in this life we only had hope it would indeed be harder to acquire a due serenity of mind upon the loss of a beloved Friend. If he were absolutely extinct, to forget him would be perhaps necessary to our Peace of Mind. But now as our Holy Religion teaches we may contemplate him translated to a better Life and ineffably enjoying all that variety of Bliss which Eye hath not seen nor Ear heard nor the Heart conceived.

— from History of the Blair, Banister and Braxton Families (1898), by John Blair

John Blair (1732–1800) was a founding father of the United States, a signer of the U.S. Constitution, and one of the most renowned jurists of his times. He avoided the political scene, choosing instead to work through legal and juridical means to ensure that the newly formed United States would survive its infancy and endure into the future. Born and raised in Virginia, he became a stalwart ally of fellow Virginians James Madison and George Washington. It was the father of our country, in fact, who nominated him to the Supreme Court in 1789.

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