Typical Anti-Semitism

Regarding Name Withheld’s letter (August 16) concerning the Sheep and Goats interview with Rabbi Cain. Rabbi Cain’s belief in reincarnation is not a belief typically held by Jews. The fact that this is his belief speaks to the freedom of thought within most of the Jewish world, rather than the “intellectual slavery” to which this writer refers. Furthermore, regarding the “mythology of racial supremacy” the writer claims is Jewish belief: Judaism may be considered a culture or a people as well as a religion. It is not, however, a race. Jews come in all races and colors.

Jesus was a Jew who preached Judaism. Where does the letter writer come up with the idea Jesus said “freedom is found in rejecting the slavery of Judaic racism” and that is “why the rabbis had him crucified”? These irresponsible, unsupportable thoughts are typical foundations of anti-Semitism.

Ina Weitzman
via email

Stars and Fairies

Barbarella, I enjoy your column! I was reading the current issue of the Reader and, after going through your story called “The Last Unicorns” (August 16), I came across the picture of the armored unicorn that blew you guys away. I had to write in, because everything in that picture (aside from the Nyan cat) is from an Adult Swim game on Facebook, called Robot Unicorn Attack. It is a hilarious and incredibly addicting time-waster, from the game play right down to the theme song in the background (“Always,” Erasure), where your lives are “wishes” and you slowly speed up and dash through stars and collect fairies.

Hopefully this news doesn’t disqualify your friend’s entry to the picture competition. But you now have something else to compete in at unicorn parties. Who can get the highest score on Robot Unicorn Attack? Welcome to your newest obsession. Enjoy chasing your dreams!

Clayton Hawley
via email

McError

On page 76 (“Homegrown,” August 16), that’s not a picture of Jim McInnes, you boners.

Thomas Rucker
via voicemail

Vedder Knew Better

In last week’s music column (August 16), longtime local music champion Jim McInnes mentions that he once passed on Eddie Vedder’s San Diego group Bad Radio simply because Vedder had sent him a poor-quality cassette and it wasn’t up to his standards for airing on his radio show.

If I were to wager a guess as to why Vedder would do such an intentional gaff that would most obviously take him out of the running for local airtime way back then, it would be because Vedder knew precisely that sending a cassette along would challenge the show’s paradigm. Even a cursory look at Eddie Vedder’s career reveals an extremely intelligent, articulate, and ferociously strong-willed personality who has always gone in the face of convention in the way he records, tours, and markets himself.

The universal truth about music and musicians is that true artistic brilliance can no more be obscured by a poor or subquality recording than the utter lack of true artistic brilliance can be compensated for with a sonically brilliant recording. Local college radio stations that focus on old jazz and blues formats understand this truism instinctively, and will readily play sonically subpar, 80-year-old vinyl simply because of the artistic brilliance that shines out of that old vinyl.

I believe Eddie Vedder understood this instinctively and was interested in who was willing to color outside the lines and who wasn’t, who was willing to push boundaries and who wasn’t. He got his answer.

I believe there is a second universal music truth to be reminded of from the little story of Eddie Vedder and his cassette and it’s this: From today’s opening act comes tomorrow’s headliner. Since nobody is smart enough to know who the next Eddie Vedder is going to be, the smartest choice is to treat every opening act well and with respect. If that opening act happens to one day become a headliner, they may very well remember you, and depending on the degree of fairness and openness you’ve displayed with them in the past, this can be both profitable for you and your business in ways you cannot even imagine. Conversely, if you screw over that opening act and that opening act one day happens to become a headliner, you can rest assured they will never forget you, and depending on the degree of shortsightedness and unadulterated stupidity you have displayed with them in the past, this can be unprofitable for you and your business in ways you cannot even imagine.

Jim Earp
via email

Water Source

I would like to call attention to the Calendar section of the Thursday, August 9 issue of the Reader. Water Gun Fight is promoted by an unknown source. I would suggest that the Reader provide contact information for this event planner, and in the future I suggest that any Reader calendar posters come clean and provide phone numbers or other identifiers of event planners, as liability issues could occur.

I understand that Johnathan Hale, Carl Demaio’s partner, was one of the event planners. If you want to print this, please don’t print my name because I feel like Carl Demaio has a lot of power and press in this industry.

Name Withheld
via voicemail

Read It, Bleeding Hearts

I cannot commend you enough for repeating your February 20, 2003 article, “What Made Them Kill” (August 2). Having worked in the San Diego criminal courts for over 19 years, listening to horrific testimony, viewing gruesome morgue photos and such, I would like to recommend that all the bleeding-heart death-penalty protestors read this article over and over again.

The local press has a tendency to gloss over the very gory details of our high-profile cases and, thus, the public is not made aware of the horrible deaths these victims suffer.

For all of the aforementioned BHDPPs who believe the likes of Hamilton, Eubanks, or especially Gonzales, have a right to live out their lives, ask yourself how you would feel if the atrocities committed by these subhuman creatures happened to one of your relatives.

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