Eastern Orthodox monasteries of Moldavia
  • Eastern Orthodox monasteries of Moldavia
  • Story alerts
  • Letter to Editor
  • Pin it

I boarded Lufthansa Airlines from LAX with a certain giddiness and anticipation. I was ready for a long flight over the U.S., Canada, Iceland, the Northern Sea and Germany – my final destination being Bucharest (or Bucuresti), the capital of Romania.

Romania’s southeastern European location holds thousands of years of history, culture and tradition. I had to decide where my visit would take me this time: the Black Sea and its luxury resorts, the beautiful Carpathian Mountains with cozy cottages and hotels, a cruise along the Danube River and the Danube Delta, Transylvania and its relentless Dracula and his castle, the cultural life of the major cities, or the Eastern Orthodox monasteries of Moldavia.

I chose a spiritual journey to the ancient Moldavian monasteries: Arbore Monastery (built in 1503), Humor (1530), Moldovita (1532), Patrauti Monastery (1487), Suceava (1522), Voronet (1487) and Sucevita (1583). Each monastery has its own personality and architectural style. Outdoor and indoor frescoes depicting religious scenes fascinate the eyes and minds of tourists.

Entering the church, you’re inclined to approach solemnly and humbly. Passing two separate stands that hold hundreds of thin yellow candles lit for the souls of the departed, you head slowly towards the altar, mesmerized by Byzantine-influenced icons and priests in holy attire.

Later in the journey, I had the unique experience of dining with the nuns at a long wooden table – so long it felt like one could unroll a scroll of the entire history of Christian religion. As I ate the meal the nuns cooked, I peeked a little at their faces: so much peace and purity of the soul…so much resembling the icons with no lines of worries…as if time had stopped indefinitely.

  • Story alerts
  • Letter to Editor
  • Pin it

More from SDReader

Comments

SalvatoreButtaci May 31, 2011 @ 5:58 a.m.

Iolanda, thank you for this descriptive piece that felt to me like a trip to Romania.

Salvatore Buttaci, author of 200 Shorts

0

Mircea P Feb. 7, 2012 @ 8:59 p.m.

Foarte foarte frumos, felicitari pt. articol, and btw, I realy like your personal website, it is calm and peacefully, Mircea

0

Iolanda Scripca March 11, 2012 @ 4:20 p.m.

It's nice to read you comment. Thank you, Mircea!

0

Sign in to comment

Join our
newsletter list

Enter to win $25 at Broken Yolk Cafe

Each newsletter subscription
means another chance to win!

Close