Julie Hoisington, owner of San Diego Community Newspaper Group, believes a competitor, Anthony Allegretti, is trying to shake her down.
  • Julie Hoisington, owner of San Diego Community Newspaper Group, believes a competitor, Anthony Allegretti, is trying to shake her down.
  • Story alerts
  • Letter to Editor
  • Pin it

On Valentine’s Day, Anthony Allegretti, president of MainStreet Media Group, a company that publishes eight community newspapers in San Diego County, wrote letters to two fellow publishers. One went to Jim Kydd, owner of the Coast News Group, which publishes the Coast News and Rancho Santa Fe News, and the other to Julie Hoisington, owner of the San Diego Community Newspaper Group, which publishes the La Jolla Village News, Beach and Bay Press, Peninsula Beacon, and San Diego Downtown News.

Despite the date, the letters expressed no adoring praise. Instead, each missive consisted of two letters and 28 pages of material downloaded from the legal website Lexis.

“Your newspaper, the Rancho Santa Fe News, has violated the law through below cost selling,” read the cover letter to Jim Kydd. “The Rancho Santa Fe News has caused the Rancho Santa Fe Review to lose sales and profits of no less than $300,000 during 2010.”

Rancho Santa Fe News publisher Jim Kydd

Allegretti claimed that Kydd’s publication, the Rancho Santa Fe News, was violating California’s Unfair Practices Act by undercharging for advertising.

“According to California Law, the Rancho Santa Fe Review is entitled to injunctive relief awards of no less than three times the amount of actual damages, or $900,000 plus attorney fees,” read the letter.

“If the below cost selling of advertising does not cease by March 15, 2011, MainStreet Communications will instruct its attorneys to commence drafting a lawsuit. Once that process begins, MainStreet Communications will not settle until the court has ruled.”

The second letter to Kydd included the statement: “MainStreet’s attorneys estimate that to take this matter thru trial will cost up to $2,000,000.”

Julie Hoisington’s letters were nearly identical. In his cover letter to Hoisington, Allegretti claimed that she was selling below-cost ads in the La Jolla Village News, which was hurting advertising revenues at MainStreet’s paper, the La Jolla Light.

The letters are the latest skirmish in what has been an ongoing clash between Allegretti and local competitors, one that started shortly after Allegretti’s company, MainStreet Media, ventured south in 2004 from its Gilroy, California headquarters and began buying community papers in San Diego County.

“I’m sure this is a scare tactic that he’s probably tried before,” Kydd says from a narrow cubicle inside Coast News Group offices. Kydd, who started his paper in 1986 out of the garage in his Encinitas home, is not bashful in showing his contempt for Allegretti.

“He knows some papers are hurting and now is the time to push them out. But I won’t be bullied.”

According to the display-ad rates at each paper, both Hoisington and Kydd charge less than their MainStreet competitors. They say they can because their overhead is lower than MainStreet’s and it costs less to run their businesses.

The price for one full-page black-and-white ad in Hoisington’s La Jolla Village News is $1480 for one week or $1101 per week for 26 weeks. In Allegretti’s La Jolla Light, the same ad costs $2420 for one week or $1950 per week for 26 weeks.

In Kydd’s Rancho Santa Fe News, a full-page black-and-white ad costs $1305 for one week, $810 per week for 26 weeks. In Allegretti’s Rancho Santa Fe Review, the ad costs $1315 and $1035, respectively.

Although Kydd and Hoisington consider Allegretti’s letters just another attempt to corner the community-newspaper market in San Diego County, both fear that he will stop at nothing to achieve his goal.

In fact, Allegretti has a long history of buying community newspapers. From 1989 to 2000, he grew the Independent Media Group, where he was chief executive, from 4 daily newspapers to 44 publications throughout Michigan, Wisconsin, and Nebraska.

In 2000, those papers were sold, and Allegretti moved west to California’s Central Valley to run Pacific-Sierra Publishing, where he continued to buy small daily and weekly newspapers.

Four years after arriving in California, Allegretti and his senior vice president, Steve Staloch, along with investors, bought out Pacific-Sierra and formed MainStreet Media Group, acquiring the La Jolla Light in the process.

Now, seven years later, with backing from Brookside Capital Partners Management out of Greenwich, Connecticut, and Housatonic Partners, MainStreet Media Group has grown from 8 publications to 17. The company owns the La Jolla Light, Del Mar Times, Solana Beach Sun, Ramona Sentinel, Poway News Chieftain, Rancho Bernardo News Journal, Rancho Santa Fe Review, and Carmel Valley News. In 2009, the company acquired three competing newspapers in Del Mar, Carmel Valley, and Rancho Santa Fe and began calling its San Diego operations MainStreet Communications.

“I knew he was going to come into town and try and buy everyone out. This letter,” Kydd holds it up, “is a scare tactic so that he can buy my paper and have a monopoly. He wanted to buy me out, but I told him no, not for any price.”

Inside San Diego Community Newspaper Group’s offices near the corner of Cass Street and Garnet Avenue in Pacific Beach, Hoisington, who started publishing the Beach and Bay Press in 1988 and the La Jolla Village News in 1993, talks about her experience with Allegretti since he took over the La Jolla Light. Hoisington says that she has received letters from Allegretti in the past. And on two occasions, he offered to buy the La Jolla Village News.

“He threw me a ridiculously insulting offer a few years ago, after I received the first letter. This time, we met, and I told him he was a bully, but if he really wanted me out, then make me a fair offer. I gave a number. He followed with a letter of intent with some ridiculous conditions attached,” she says.

“I have no problem with competition in the marketplace. But since Allegretti and the MainStreet Media Group took over, there’s been a different type of competitiveness.”

Hoisington adds, “We are the real local community newspapers. We’ve raised our children in the community, and we run our business here. But my concern is that they are a corporation with investors and money in the bank. I don’t have deep pockets to go through some lawsuit. I am concerned that I might have to play the legal game.”

  • Story alerts
  • Letter to Editor
  • Pin it

More from SDReader

Comments

scf April 20, 2011 @ 3:12 p.m.

ah my god this guy alligretti is a serious moron..hes siting case law thats meant to protect the small guy! idiot!!...I think thats pathetic he feels its necessary to try and scare owners by saying they estimate 2 mil in legal fees?? get the f@^& outta here..what a thug...think hes gonna come in and shake people down..scare people? shit, he aint even from here...as the lady from sd said, we have raised families here, started businesses...he just moves into town and thinks hes gonna take over? like hes some gangster or something? please.. Hey Alligrody...heres a message for you...Dont hate the player, hate the game....if you must hate om something.. nice try though, your scare tactics almost worked..

0

SurfPuppy619 April 26, 2011 @ 6:09 p.m.

Although Kydd and Hoisington consider Allegretti’s letters just another attempt to corner the community-newspaper market in San Diego County, both fear that he will stop at nothing to achieve his goal.

--

We are the real local community newspapers. We’ve raised our children in the community, and we run our business here. But my concern is that they are a corporation with investors and money in the bank. I don’t have deep pockets to go through some lawsuit. I am concerned that I might have to play the legal game.”

Allegretti is an idiot if he thinks ANYONE is going to fall for his sham attempt at a shakedown.

And since he has a subscription to Lexis-Nexis he needs to look up California's Anti-SLAPP codes-CCP 425.16, because I have a strong feeling he may be violating it.

0

Visduh April 20, 2011 @ 7:59 p.m.

This may be a reflection of how the newspaper industry has changed in the past 20-30 years. When I was peripherally involved with it, there were many such papers, and all seemed to be making a nice living or better. In the late 70's a number of the news chains started to go around the US buying up community papers as fast as they could, paying millions to the mom-and-pop owners of many of them. The mass merchandise retailers, notably Kmart, wanted a saturation delivery system to get their preprinted ads into every household, and were willing to pay for it.

The La Jolla Light was a class publication. It was bought as part of the Harte-Hanks attempt to unseat Copley, starting about 1972. That attempt failed. It has been through many changes of ownership since, that's for sure. The whole topic of this story smacks of bullying, and there's more of that out there than most of us could imagine. With major daily newspapers on the ropes, this group is really trying to swim against the current.

I've seen how bullying, the sort that had little or no legal basis, can get non-confrontational people to back down. The prospect of paying megabucks to some attorney to defend you can surely be discouraging. Many innocent folks just fold when so threatened. Let's hope these small fry fight back.

0

SurfPuppy619 April 26, 2011 @ 6:31 p.m.

I've seen how bullying, the sort that had little or no legal basis, can get non-confrontational people to back down. The prospect of paying megabucks to some attorney to defend you can surely be discouraging.

If you're a business owner and someone is trying to stick their hand in your pocket you better learn to be confrontational or you will not be a business owner for very long.

0

MiriamRaftery April 28, 2011 @ 12:39 a.m.

I'd counter sue this bully for harassment if I were those publishers. Hasn't he ever heard of the free market and competition?

After reading this, I will never read his publications or link to them, since I can't abide anyone who tries to intimidate the press. Apparently he doesn't believe the market will support his publications on their merit, so he stoops to harassing his competitors.

0

Sign in to comment

Join our
newsletter list

Enter to win $25 at Broken Yolk Cafe

Each newsletter subscription
means another chance to win!

Close