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Yellow Cab of Tijuana has hung a sign from its border cab lot to let riders know that it has halted a month-old program that offered one-dollar group-rate rides from the border to downtown.

Yellow Cab blames the curtailment on longtime carrier Azul y Blanco bus line, which allegedly complained to the local transportation authorities that the cab company was stomping on its “cheap fare” turf (the route from the border to the corner of Calle Tercera and Constitución, downtown).

A large sign hanging over the Yellow Cab lot offers apologies to customers and indicates that the cessation of service was the result of a dispute with the local transportation authorities and the cozy relationship they have with the bus line, traditionally the “cheap dollar” carrier to the downtown area. The sign indicated that some Yellow Cabs have been towed away at the behest of Azul y Blanco.

Normally, cab rides from Yellow command a five-dollar solo price, but the economic slowdown drove the company to slash rates, which ultimately put it in competition with the bus line. Yellow Cab strongly hinted that the dispute is all about money and “compromisos” (pre-arranged and somewhat suspect agreements) between Azul y Blanco and the powers that be.

The last line of the sign indicates that Yellow Cab is trying to arrange to bring the service back by gathering enough money to make the necessary arrangements. The 10 peso, or “dollar,” service was popular with people wanting to quickly get downtown with a minimum of hassle.

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David Dodd April 16, 2010 @ 11:36 a.m.

The Yellow Cab syndicate has historically controlled transportation (through questionable tactics at times including documented violence against the competition) of pedestrian tourists from the border to downtown Tijuana for many decades. In my opinion this is deserved karma for their mistreatment of fellow Tijuanenses trying to scrape out a living in these difficult economic and political conditions concerning tourism in Tijuana. The once-strong become the now-weak. While I feel for the drivers of the Yellow Cabs, I can't imagine anyone that has witnessed their dominating influence over the years who doesn't consider in some way that those who have exhibited such questionable behavior often deserve what comes their way.

Or, more simply stated, payback is a bitch.

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JohnEdwardRangel April 17, 2010 @ 9:02 a.m.

I agree with you RG. Whenever I think of those jerks I recall an incident where they were used to bully a group of Tijuanenses who were staging a sit in at city hall. Most of the group was comprised of women and children who had been displaced from their land. The local politicians used them like stormtroopers and the yellow shirts brutally complied. Most locals that I know avoid them like the plague. You reap what you sow.
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David Dodd April 17, 2010 @ 2:10 p.m.

I remember that, John! I have always loved what Tijuanenses refer to as "mafia", not so much in terms of how it is recognized abroad, but in terms of those who gain such high influence who are then asked to return the favor, and it goes on and on. The Yellow Cab syndicate garnered a lot of support from local politicians, who then called in their favors. It's quite disgusting. And it happens in the U.S., too!

I remain completely skeptical and almost contemptually critical of such clandestine volunteerism, it almost always leads to no good. The people who do good deeds out of the love of human kind never align themselves, never gather forces, they simply lift bricks and mix cement - we never hear about them. Others form syndicates and align themselves politically, those are the ones that are frightening. They pretend to protect their livelyhood, but usually there are greater prizes in their sights.

The Yellow Cabs are where they are because of what they wanted to become, and they have no one to blame but themselves.

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antigeekess April 17, 2010 @ 7:15 p.m.

I kinda wondered when I went down there why the Yellows obviously controlled that prime area at the border. I would've taken a cheaper Blue&White/Brown&White, but there were none handy.

:/

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David Dodd April 17, 2010 @ 7:23 p.m.

I usually always walk, so no big deal for me, but there are options. The busses drop you off near Centro, and some of the other cabs can be caught; walk to the East of the plaza and all of the way down toward the river and there are metered cabs there, orange & white.

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David Dodd April 17, 2010 @ 7:23 p.m.

I usually always walk, so no big deal for me, but there are options. The busses drop you off near Centro, and some of the other cabs can be caught; walk to the East of the plaza and all of the way down toward the river and there are metered cabs there, orange & white.

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David Dodd April 17, 2010 @ 10:11 p.m.

Yeah, apparently. Mostly I would have an idea, like hitting a button or something, but this one just happened for no reason.

Mah two feets is as good an explahnation as anything ;)

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