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Two weeks ago the South Bay Expressway, run by a subsidiary of Australia’s Macquarie Infrastructure Group, filed for bankruptcy, a victim of high gas prices and generally recessionary times. But before it went officially broke, the highway, which runs from Otay Mesa to Spring Valley via EastLake and Chula Vista’s Otay Ranch, furnished some local politicos with last-hurrah cash. According to a state disclosure filing, dated last April 20, the expressway operation gave $1000 each to assembly members Marty Block and Mary Salas, both Democrats, and to Republican state senator Dennis Hollingsworth. Democrat Mary Hayashi’s state assembly campaign got $500. Last year the now-bankrupt highway company spent a total of $36,606.38 on the lobbying firm of Aprea & Micheli.

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a2zresource April 9, 2010 @ 11:39 a.m.

One wonders if South Bay Expressway creditors have attorneys sufficiently wise regarding bankruptcy petitioner's transfers of assets within a given period of years prior to filing.

I'm not bothering to wonder about the ethics of politicians and lobbying firms that will no doubt fight any attempt to have them disgorge anything preferentially or otherwise improperly transferred to them, in anticipation by South Bay Expressway of its recent bankruptcy filing.

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SurfPuppy619 April 17, 2010 @ 11:01 a.m.

One wonders if South Bay Expressway creditors have attorneys sufficiently wise regarding bankruptcy petitioner's transfers of assets within a given period of years prior to filing.

All of that money can be taken back by the BKtrutee/BKcourt/creditors.And the idiots that gave it away will be subject to felony fraud for making the transactions.

You don't get to give away all of your asets and then file BK, it is that simple.

The trustee/BK court will not alllow it. Not a bona fide transfer.

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SurfPuppy619 April 17, 2010 @ 11:04 a.m.

This is also why we have the gas tax-to pay for transportation projects-not to have that gas tax money diverted to state employee comp (6 figure salary and pensions), which then leaves transportation projects short and taxpayers getting taxed twice for the same thing.

This is the reason why this state is so screwed up.

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Visduh April 19, 2010 @ 7:11 p.m.

One can only wonder about these toll roads trying to compete with free Interstate freeways. The Route 73 "bypass" in Orange County was eagerly anticipated by many commuters who suffered through that infamous "El Toro Wye" for years or decades. Yet that roller-coaster freeway isn't doing well. It loads up during peak traffic periods, and is a ghost freeway the rest of the time. Because of the disappointing use of the route, the tolls have been raised, and raised, and raised . . .

If you have one of these routes, and the toll income is disappointing, what do you do? The government answer is to boost the toll to raise revenue. But government seldom understands the laws of supply and demand. A typical businessperson would first want to lower the toll to attract more users. The economists call that "elasticity of demand."

Before anyone proposes any additional use of toll roads in this region, the lack of success of those already attempted needs to be scrutinized closely. Motorists will readily pay something to avoid congestion and lost time. The key question is how much they will pay. The current experience is that they will not pay a huge amount, and that's what many/most of the toll roads now charge.

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