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Shortly after the landslide occurred October 3, City Attorney Mike Aguirre visited victims, hearing their complaints. He noted that the City had written residents on September 19, telling them of a series of water leaks on the main water line to the street. After Aguirre spoke, Sanders and two of his underlings declared, with no evidence, that the City, in effect, had no liability. Radio entertainer Roger Hedgecock and major Voice of San Diego donor Dan Shea charged that Aguirre had opened the City to liability by seeking the truth. The Union-Tribune's editorial page, which has an aversion to truth, said the same. But the charge is sheer poppycock. Aguirre, unlike his predecessors in the city attorney's office, believes his mandate is to weigh the evidence fairly. The courts will hear experts representing both sides. The litigation will probably go on several years. It is certain to be educational.

Golding went hell-bent for economic growth in 1992. She was reelected in 1996. The tragic irony is that by the end of her second term in 2000, San Diego growth was already showing signs of slowing. Within a couple of years, real estate prices began to soar. Highways jammed. The long-neglected infrastructure, which couldn't handle the accelerated growth, crumbled even more. The water crisis awoke some residents. San Diego was no longer an attractive place for a company to locate. Housing prices got so high that population growth almost halted. Now San Diego is as overgrown as Los Angeles. But the real estate developers still have the mayor in their pockets.

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