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— The mob that built La Costa scattered long ago. Moe Dalitz, the fixer out of Cleveland via Las Vegas who tapped Jimmy Hoffa's Teamsters Central States Pension Fund for $57 million to build the place, died peacefully in 1989. John Duffy, the San Diego County Sheriff who looked the other way when the mob reputedly ran hookers and high-stakes poker out of the posh La Costa Clubhouse, died semi-mysteriously while on a business trip to Central America in 1993. Hoffa dropped from sight in 1975 after going off in a limo to meet some "friends." Years before, Allard Roen, one of Dalitz's partners in La Costa, was interviewed by a reporter from the San Diego Evening Tribune. "Jimmy doesn't drink, smoke, or chase around after women," Roen said. "People think Teamsters money is bad because it is associated by some with gangsters. That is not true. They have access to huge sums of money. It's only logical for them to invest." Roen's statement, of course, came years before Hoffa's disappearance, the hit on Teamsters lawyer Allen Dorfman, and the testimony of La Jolla financier Allen Glick and mafia hit man Jimmy "The Weasel" Fratianno forever linked the resort to organized crime.

But that was then. The resort knocked away the mud of its mobbed-up beginnings when original partners sold out in 1987 to a Japanese outfit from Osaka called Sports Shinko. Today, the golf course where Jimmy Hoffa, Frank Fitzsimmons, Jackie Presser, and Richard Nixon, among many others, once discussed politics, kickbacks, prostitutes, casino skims, and mob hits is now just another golden suburb, an upscale neighborhood in the city of Carlsbad. Oversized houses with eight-car garages march along the ridgelines overlooking the obscenely green golf course, where the most notorious player recently sighted was said to be O.J. Simpson. Private pools built right up to the fairway are full of frolicking children watched over by Mexican nannies and soccer moms who drive family-style four-wheel drive trucks made by Mercedes-Benz. Blonde teenagers zip around in new Miatas and shiny Corvettes. How much more wholesome can you get?

Still, lurking in its velvet-lined nooks and crannies, La Costa holds some secrets. Take Al Borda. A dropout from Torrey Pines High, Borda says he's one of the most successful producers of pornographic movies in the country, maybe even the world. In the business of porn for more than four years, Borda runs his enterprise out of a regulation-size office with a video editing suite in a small industrial park in Vista, just across the driveway from an outfit that rents baseball batting cages by the hour. The stockroom in back is lined with glossy video boxes with graphic photos of nude women featuring titles like Sluthunt, Butthunt, and Gothic Whore. When Borda was appearing in his own videos, he made one called Because I Can.

Originally from Philadelphia, where he says his father is a jeweler, Borda says he was dealing in luxury cars by the age of 16. Besides videos, he dabbles in the motocross racing circuit and is starting up Skin Industries, which sells decals of a female head sticking out a very long tongue, which may be applied to bikes. Borda is proud of his business and his accomplishments. Recently he agreed to be interviewed.

Matt Potter: How old are you.

Al Borda: I'm 26.

MP: So when did you get out here?

AB: I've kind of been back and forth since I was young. I went to school out here, I went to Torrey Pines High.

MP: Did you come from New York?

AB: I guess I'm from Philadelphia, and I kind of stumbled upon the adult- video business. Actually, somebody wanted to borrow money, a small amount of money, and that's how I got started in the whole deal.

MP: Somebody wanted to borrow money to make a porno film?

AB: Yeah. I invested, you know, $5000 or so.

MP: Like in a film business?

AB: Yeah, in a video. They wanted investors for a video.

MP: Okay, so you're looking around for your money, you loaned some money for the video, and you're trying to get it back? So then what?

AB: I met different distributors. They told me the money was coming soon and when was my next movie coming out. At that point I really didn't do anything except loan somebody some money. I had no film experience or manufacturing.

MP: You'd never done any video or anything like that?

AB: No, never took any classes in school or nothing.

MP: So at that point, what? A light bulb went off and you said, "Hey, I'm going to make my own adult films"?

AB: Yeah, basically. I figured if this jerk could do it, I could do it.

MP: What was your first venture then?

AB: I basically made a movie and sold it to a company called... Well, I just made the movie and sold it. I did that five or six times.

MP: What kind of movies were they?

AB: They were just adult... I think my first five or six movies were all-lesbian, all-girl movies.

MP: Any reason why you made that choice?

AB: I as the viewer never really wanted to see any guys; I was pretty content just seeing girls.

MP: So you just sort of went with your own tastes.

AB: Yeah, I went with my own tastes. My first five or six movies had all blondes with blue eyes. And then people kept telling me I had to make movies for other people; I can't just make movies for myself.

MP: So how did you cast the next movie?

AB: I called an agent they have up in L.A. who everyone uses. I just went with that. I met one girl and she knew everybody who could be in it; just did it that way.

MP: What were the budgets?

AB: Well, I was just an investor. I think the budgets were $10,000 or $12,000.

MP: How did you bankroll that? From your own pocket?

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